Worried Sick: A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America

Worried Sick: A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America

by Nortin M. Hadler

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Overview

Nortin Hadler's clearly reasoned argument surmounts the cacophony of the health care debate. Hadler urges everyone to ask health care providers how likely it is that proposed treatments will afford meaningful benefits and he teaches how to actively listen to the answer. Each chapter of Worried Sick is an object lesson on the uses and abuses of common offerings, from screening tests to medical and surgical interventions. By learning to distinguish good medical advice from persuasive medical marketing, consumers can make better decisions about their personal health care and use that wisdom to inform their perspectives on health-policy issues.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780807886175
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 02/01/2012
Series: H. Eugene and Lillian Youngs Lehman Series
Edition description: Paperback Edition Large Print
Pages: 392
Product dimensions: 6.80(w) x 9.80(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

Nortin M. Hadler, M.D., M.A.C.P., M.A.C.R., F.A.C.O.E.M., is professor of medicine and microbiology/immunology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and attending rheumatologist at UNC Hospitals. He is author of several books, including Stabbed in the Back: Confronting Back Pain in an Overtreated Society and Rethinking Aging: Growing Old and Living Well in an Overtreated Society.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Hadler documents that many Americans receive health care that is useless and often harmful because their physicians do not follow scientific standards of effectiveness. He makes a strong case that these standards should be the basis of payment and should guide patients in selecting physicians and consenting to treatment.—Daniel M. Fox, Milbank Memorial Fund



If, by some wild stretch of the imagination, the U.S. Congress convened and empowered a national convention to transform the American health-care system (i.e. industry), Nortin Hadler's Worried Sick would have to serve as the template and the moral bible. His subtitle says it all, 'A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America.'
Case by case, drug by drug, test by test, and procedure by procedure, Hadler exposes the excesses, the unjustified costliness, and the ineffectiveness of the present medical scene. With an encyclopedic review of the published medical literature, Hadler shows us that the public is medicalized to an extreme and to no gain in the overall health of the nation.
Hadler presents a proposal for a health-care insurance system that will increase the health of the nation, provide only effective care, and reduce costs. All self-funded employers must read, absorb, and install Hadler's well-founded ideas. As Hadler points out, it is probably too late for any federal plan to do anything but further increase costs and extend ineffectiveness.—Clifton K. Meador, M.D., author of A Little Book of Doctors' Rules, Med School, and Symptoms of Unknown Origin

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Worried Sick: A Prescription for Health in an Overtreated America 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
CymLowell More than 1 year ago
This tome on the over-treated, over diagnosed, over drugged world of America is interesting. The author's premise is that we are beset with rampant Type II Medical Malpractice - the performance of unnecessary testing, diagnosing, and prescribing. He seems to perceive that we are, as a culture, drug addicts of the first order, responding to the programmed prescription of pharmaceuticals by doctors who mindlessly follow the lead of drug companies and studies financed by the same folks. In the course of this herd-like plunge off the cliff, we are engaged in a huge wealth transfer from all of us to the medical establishment. What is our reward? The lowest life expectancy of any major country! Of course, this is the issue of the moment for our new President Obama, who seems obsessed with expanding this process. Whether your concern is cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, breast cancer, prostate cancer, dietary supplements, hormone replacement therapy, osteopenia, backaches, over or under-working, or whatever, Dr. Hadler offers a critical evaluation of the practical realities of studies, most of which are read to mean that current treatments are no better than placebos. Dr. Hadler's view seems to be that we all live, on average, to be about 85. By that time, we will all have our fair share of diseases and will die from one or more of them. We will be best advised if we have a trusted physician who will evaluate our maladies, advise of the realities of the treatments, and then let us take a proactive role in our own self-medication. He nowhere exactly says this, but the result seems clear enough. This is a marvelous book that should be must-reading for anyone who is concerned about any of these things - which is all of us. For me, Dr. Hadler's excellent analysis made me revisit my own mother's breast cancer treatment in the 1950s. I think that she endured a mutilation that was probably needless, did not extend the length of her life, and surely devastated the quality of her life. I hope that you are all spared such a fate. Read about being worried sick!
CymLowell on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This tome on the over-treated, over diagnosed, over drugged world of America is interesting. The author¿s premise is that we are beset with rampant Type II Medical Malpractice ¿ the performance of unnecessary testing, diagnosing, and prescribing. He seems to perceive that we are, as a culture, drug addicts of the first order, responding to the programmed prescription of pharmaceuticals by doctors who mindlessly follow the lead of drug companies and studies financed by the same folks. In the course of this herd-like plunge off the cliff, we are engaged in a huge wealth transfer from all of us to the medical establishment. What is our reward? The lowest life expectancy of any major country!Of course, this is the issue of the moment for our new President Obama, who seems obsessed with expanding this process.Whether your concern is cholesterol, blood sugar, blood pressure, breast cancer, prostate cancer, dietary supplements, hormone replacement therapy, osteopenia, backaches, over or under-working, or whatever, Dr. Hadler offers a critical evaluation of the practical realities of studies, most of which are read to mean that current treatments are no better than placebos.Dr. Hadler¿s view seems to be that we all live, on average, to be about 85. By that time, we will all have our fair share of diseases and will die from one or more of them. We will be best advised if we have a trusted physician who will evaluate our maladies, advise of the realities of the treatments, and then let us take a proactive role in our own self-medication. He nowhere exactly says this, but the result seems clear enough.This is a marvelous book that should be must-reading for anyone who is concerned about any of these things ¿ which is all of us.For me, Dr. Hadler¿s excellent analysis made me revisit my own mother¿s breast cancer treatment in the 1950s. I think that she endured a mutilation that was probably needless, did not extend the length of her life, and surely devastated the quality of her life. I hope that you are all spared such a fate. Read about being worried sick!