When True Night Falls (Coldfire Series #2)

When True Night Falls (Coldfire Series #2)

by C. S. Friedman

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Overview

Blending science fiction and fantasy, the second book of the Coldfire Trilogy continues a dark tale of an alien world where nightmares are made manifest.

Two men, absolute enemies, must unite to conquer an evil greater than anything their world has ever known. One is a warrior priest ready to sacrifice anything and everything for the cause of humanity's progress; the other, a sorcerer who has survived for countless centuries by a total submission to evil. In their joint quest, both will be irrevocably changed.

When True Night Falls is the sequel to C. S. Friedman's acclaimed Black Sun Rising.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781101464335
Publisher: DAW
Publication date: 09/01/1994
Series: Coldfire , #2
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 624
Sales rank: 117,033
File size: 892 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

An acknowledged master of Dark Fantasy, Celia Friedman is a John W. Campbell award finalist, and the author of the highly acclaimed Coldfire Trilogy, New York Times Notable Book of the Year This Alien Shore, In Conquest Born, The Madness Season, The Wilding and The Magister Trilogy.  Ms. Friedman worked for twenty years as a professional costume designer, but retired from that career in 1996 to focus on her writing. She lives in Virginia, and can be contacted via her website, www.csfriedman.com.

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When True Night Falls (Coldfire Series #2) 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 43 reviews.
onefinemess on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
***SPOILER WARNING***I was expecting it to be somewhat tedious, even though I remember it as being good when I first read it 10-15 years ago. However, I was pleasantly surprised, and it was difficult to put it down each day and pace myself through a week of lunch breaks & train rides.That being said, Hesseth's death, while serving and obvious point, just seems silly and weak, and further emphasized to me, the weakness and lack of definition of the female "leads" in this book & Black Sun Rising. Not to be stereotypical or anything, but I was somewhat surprised to find that the author is female, given her treatment of females (not treatment in the sense of treating them poorly, but treatment in the sense of a script treatment) in the books. They just never felt like solid characters. I did like Hesseth though, and wished for more for her. At least Ciani made it out alive.
leld on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I love this series. The power of thought, of suggestion. Fear and what we will do to feel safe, what we will do to survive.
Karlstar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While the middle book of some trilogies is sometimes a disappointment, this one is not. It clearly is the middle book, you need to read the 3rd book to finish the story, but this book does read well on its own. We are left a little unsatisfied at the plot and the ending, but not too much so, and as in the first book, its mostly the characters that carry the story, and they continue to be excellent.
Caragen87 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The continued adventures of the unlikely duo of Tarrant and Vryce. Simultaneous Enemies & Allies. In truth, nothing new that you haven't read in the first book, just more color and geography as they range further out across Erna.
Cecrow on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Whereas the first book was unique and intriguing, this "brilliant sequel" (cover blurb) is a repetitious and tiresome travelogue that serves as a prime example of middle book weakness in fantasy trilogies. Damien and Tarrant cross forbidding territory, tracking down a mysterious baddie in his hidden fortress with no plan of what to do when they get there. If that sounds a bit familiar it should: it's precisely what happened in the latter half of the first book, except that this time it comprises the entire novel. Damien dwells (multiple times) upon the morality of allying himself with Tarrant, while admitting (multiple times) that his quest is 100% hopeless without Tarrant backing him up. I can't help wondering why Damien contemplates going on these journeys at all. Virtually by his own admission, the only purpose he serves in these books is to put quest ideas in Tarrant's head and then pointlessly tag along, suffering all the way. New variants on villain insidiousness and a tour of the second continent aside, you can skip to the last one hundred pages where the good stuff begins and not really miss anything significant. I hope the third book will have made reading this one worthwhile.
clong on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I know that there are folks out there who are huge fans of these books, and frankly I can imagine that I might have really loved this series if I had read it when I was 12 years old or so. But I didn¿t, and coming to story at this point left me rather disappointed. I find Tarrant to be utterly unbelievable and Vryce¿s struggles with the moral dilemma of working with Tarrant get old fast. These are shallow characters inhabiting an unconvincing world battling a more or less nonsensical nemesis.Still, there were a couple of effective scenes (I was surprisingly moved by the sea captain's conversion), and it¿s better than Terry Goodkind at his worst.
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I'm an avid reader of Sci-Fi & Fantasy and was running out of reading material that didn't involve teen vampires, and stumbled upon this trilogy recommendation on more than one of the "Best Sci-Fi & Fantasy Books" websites, so I thought I would give it a shot, and was pleasantly surprised! C. S. Friedman writes beautifully. I liked that the content is more for adult reading. And the concepts, plots, and characters are new, refreshing, and very well depicted!
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