When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession

When Nietzsche Wept: A Novel of Obsession

by Irvin D. Yalom

Paperback(Older Edition)

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Overview

A richly evocative novel that portrays an astutely imagined relationship between Europe's greatest philosopher and one of the founding fathers of psychoanalysis.

Author Biography:
Irvin D. Yalom, M.D., is the author of Lying on the Couch, When Nietzche Wept, and Love's Executioner, as well as several classic textbooks on psychotherapy, including Existential Psychotherapy and The Theory and Practice of Group Psychotherapy. He is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Stanford University and lives and practices in Palo Alto, California.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780060975500
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 08/01/1993
Series: Harper Perennial
Edition description: Older Edition
Pages: 301
Product dimensions: 5.34(w) x 8.16(h) x 0.77(d)

About the Author

Irvin D. Yalom, M.D., is the author of The Schopenhauer CureLying on the CouchEvery Day Gets a Little Closer, and Love's Executioner, as well as several classic textbooks on psychotherapy. When Nietzsche Wept was a bestseller in Germany, Israel, Greece, Turkey, Argentina, and Brazil with millions of copies sold worldwide. Yalom is Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry at Stanford University, and he divides his practice between Palo Alto, where he lives, and San Francisco, California.

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When Nietzsche Wept 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 16 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An incredibly well written book that is engaging from the first page and kept me going and wanting more, right until the end. I'm looking forward to reading his other works and to more books to come from this inspiring and entertaining, and clearly very intelligent doctor/writer. Reading this book is a form of therapy, you get more out of it than you realize.
Guest More than 1 year ago
If you are in any way interested in philosophy and psychology and in how the one can possibly be of any importance to the other, you must read this intelligent, well thought through book. It will enrich and inspire you and show you that there really are no boundries between the different disciplines. All that is needed is your curiosity and your willingness to let fixed ways of thinking and looking at yourself and others go.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book tells a fictional tale of Emil Breur, Nietzsche, & Freud. Breur is Nietzsche's 'therapist' and Freud consults on the case some. It takes you into the minds of all three in a very unique manner. Great read!!
mottledpigeon on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Pretentious and tedious. Hated it.
hennis on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Badly written, this novel did not appeal to me at all. The discussions between the dokter something and "his patient" were somewhat interesting, but the writing style throughout the book was way too sentimental. Such a bad writer. I must say it is one of the worst books I have ever finished.
Linus_Linus on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The writing is average , but the content is very interesting. I particularly liked the latter half which supposes a trenchant interaction between Breuer and Nietzsche in late 19th century, thus giving birth to the science and philosophy of psychotherapy. Just for its possibility should be read once.
marianapdias on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I only got interested on the reading after page 200, so you have to be very persistent on it.I read it until the end because I don't like giving up on books, but I feel like I wasted a lot of my time and my patience on this one.Boring, with freaking unecessary descriptions of sex from doctor Bauer.Read it only if you have no other choice (which I believe is not the case here).
Parthurbook on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
How might psychotherapy have started? Certainly protagonist Josef Breuer has been overshadowed by Freud in popular consciousness (excuse the pun). Here, Yalom tries to set the record straight about the birth of the 'talking cure', albeit through an imagined, hypothesized version of history. Which has great resonance in the book because the relationship between Breuer and Nietzsche itself becomes is mutual deception - from which emerges two deep personal truths. The intellectual and emotional chase is thrilling and, at its climax, genuinely moving. An engrossing re-creation of C19th Vienna which frames vivid portraits of two thinkers who did much to shape C20th thought.
mschaefer on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A fictitious story about the origins of psychotherapy in a consultation of Friedrich Nietzsche with Joseph Breuer. An excellent novel of ideas, developing its themes with virtuousity.
MiserableLibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Yalom spins an engaging and thoughtful story of a relationship between Friedrich Nietzsche and Joseph Breuer, a leading turn-of-the-century doctor in Vienna who was involved in the early development of psychotherapy. Breuer is engaged to take on Nietzsche¿s case by a woman friend of Nietzsche¿s named Lou Salome. Through his experimentation with the ¿talking cure,¿ Breuer finds that his own problems consume the majority of their time together. The tale illuminates the necessarily close ties between psychotherapy and philosophy, and (for Yalom, once again) the fact that no therapist can solve a patient¿s problems, but can facilitate an individual¿s own self-cure. Certainly contrived, sometimes a little hokey, but an enjoyable story.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Blew me away! I have a habit of reading with a Sharpie highlighter. It came in very handy and I used it often. Very thought provoking read. The next book I read will most likely be a let down.
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