What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful

What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful

by Marshall Goldsmith, Mark Reiter

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Overview

Whether you are near the top of the ladder or still have a ways to climb, this book serves as an essential guide to help you eliminate your dysfunctions and move to where you want to go.

Marshall Goldsmith is an expert at helping global leaders overcome their sometimes unconscious annoying habits and attain a higher level of success. His one-on-one coaching comes with a six-figure price tag. But, in this book, you get Marshall's great advice without the hefty fee!

"Marshall Goldsmith is one of the most credible thought leaders in the new era of business."-The Economist

"For over a decade I have worked with Marshall in corporations and seen him teach. In my opinion, he is the best at what he does, bar none. He has that rare combination that makes a great teacher-thought leadership, classroom management, and presence."-Vijay Govindarajan, professor and director, Center for Global Leadership, Tuck School, Dartmouth University

"America's preeminent executive coach."-Fast Company

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781401301309
Publisher: Hachette Books
Publication date: 01/09/2007
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 74,403
Product dimensions: 9.50(w) x 6.44(h) x 0.83(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Marshall Goldsmith has been widely recognized as the world's #1 leadership thinker and executive coach. He is one of a select few advisors who have been asked to work with more than 150 major CEOs and their management teams. His 32 books have been translated into 28 languages and have been listed bestsellers in 11 countries. The American Management Association has listed Dr. Goldsmith as one of the great thinkers and leaders who have impacted the field of management over the past 50 years, and BusinessWeek has recognized him as one of the most influential practitioners in the history of leadership development. Marshall provides hundreds of his articles, audios, and videos online at www.MarshallGoldsmithLibrary.com.

Mark Reiter has collaborated on thirteen previous books. He is also a literary agent in Bronxville, New York.

Table of Contents


Acknowledgments     xi
The Trouble with Success
You Are Here     3
Enough About You     11
The Success Delusion, or Why We Resist Change     16
The Twenty Habits That Hold You Back from the Top
The Twenty Habits     35
The Twenty-First Habit: Goal Obsession     99
How We Can Change for the Better
Feedback     111
Apologizing     136
Telling the World, or Advertising     142
Listening     147
Thanking     157
Following Up     161
Practicing Feedforward     170
Pulling Out the Stops
Changing: The Rules     179
Special Challenges for People in Charge     199
Coda: You Are Here Now     221
Appendix     225
Index     231

What People are Saying About This

David Zweig

"The book is written pretty much the way Marshall speaks. It is simple, brutally honest, and humorous. It doesn't try to get fancy. It's economically composed, crafted to be useful. It will appeal to people with no time to waste. Like its author, it's practical and to the point . . . What Got You Here will be required reading for many years to come."--(David Zweig, Senior Editor, World Business Academy Perspectives)

Barbara Rose

"Goldsmith has no interest in probing why people behave the way they do. He doesn't try to reshape their personalities. He measures success by the extent to which other people's perceptions of his clients change for the better . . . he teaches them how to apologize for their shortcomings -- 'the most magical, healing, restorative gesture human beings can make,' he writes in his book [What Got You Here Won't Get You There] . . . and then to ask for help in getting better . . . 'It's much harder to change people's perceptions of your behavior than to change your behavior,' he says . . ."--(Barbara Rose, Chicago Tribune)

Harvey Schachter

"This is a superb book, practical with a rich understanding of human behaviour and how to change. Mr. Goldsmith has endless examples from his work and his own personal failings, and the result is a chance for readers whose companies don't hire him to get the benefit of his expertise."--(Harvey Schachter, Globe and Mail)

Diane Donovan

"What holds you back from achievement? Marshall Goldsmith is an executive coach who has worked with over eighty CEOs in the world's top organizations -- so he's in the perfect position to examine how global leaders overcome self-defeating habits, translating these lessons to the modern condition and everyday man in What Got You Here Won't Get You There. From key beliefs in successful leaders to common behavior flaws, this book translates drawbacks to success, and will find an audience in any general-interest collection where self-improvement is of interest."--(Diane Donovan, Midwest Book Review/California Bookwatch)

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What Got You Here, Won't Get You There 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 84 reviews.
Brien_Convery More than 1 year ago
The IBM Competitive Edge Book Club, open to Sales, Marketing, and Communications professionals at IBM, voted and selected "What Got You Here Won't Get You There" as the Q2 2009 book selection. The feedback regarding the book and Marshall's messages was extremely positive. In the feedback from the members, we ask them the question - "What will you do differently in your job since your study of this book." Some of the replies directly from the members included: - "Brings into focus the ability to look at the things that you do day-to-day and re-evaluate what can be done, should done and what can be ignored or eliminated." - "I will stop and breathe and ask myself at least one of the questions Marshall suggests: will my comment increase the commitment of the other person or will this benefit me and my family. then after that, if the answer is "no" ... is it worth it?" - "I'll try to spend more time coaching / listening and resist the temptation to "add value to everything." - "Appreciated his perspective of the customer - loved the waiter example." - "I will be much more cognizant of the twenty habits limiting future success. Likewise I intend to use some of the suggestions for effective peer feedback solicitation. Finally, when in a mentoring position, this is a book I will readily recommend." Marshall - Thank you, your energy and enthusiasm enables us to think differently and strategically to make those changes in ourselves. Best Regards, Brien Convery IBM Global Workforce Partner and Competitive Edge Book Club Leader
Guest More than 1 year ago
From a purely economic perspective, this may be among the most valuable books in print. If every executive followed the advice in this book, we wouldn't have more than 100 million Americans who are not engaged in their jobs and, as a result, productivity and innovation would soar. In this book, uber-executive coach Marshall Goldsmith shares his insights about the most common habitual behaviors that prevent leaders from reaching their potential and how to overcome them. We all have these blind spots that others see but we don't. It's part of the human condition. In this book Marshall provides the best description I have ever seen of the most common blind spots. Marshall provides thorough explanations and illustrates his points with compelling anonymous examples from his work with high achievers. Reading this book is the next best thing to having Marshall as a coach.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This volume should be read by many managers, self appointed leaders and so-called executives who ignore the fundamentals of what makes business work: it's not the mechanisms, but ones' sensitivity to people and the manner in which we behave. Further, Goldsmith's care in suggesting that these techniques be tried at home are wonderful! He's humorous, experienced, caring and obviously passionate about helping others. Short read, great content!
Lotti75 More than 1 year ago
The book from Marshall Goldsmith is nice. Unfortunately the quality of the audiobook copy provided through Barnes & Noble is bad. It has repeating sequences at the end of most chapters/tracks. Sounds as if ripped from scratched CD in very poor quality.
lemme14 More than 1 year ago
I thought the information contained in the book was worthwhile. However, I think the author spent a lot of stories that were not necessary to drive home the points. The headings meant a lot. But instead of spending 10 pages describing, a paragraph or two would have sufficed. For this, two stars get deducted.
DanStratton on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I had heard about this book many times before I queued it up on Audible.com. I wish I would have read it sooner. This is a great one for anyone in a career who wants to or has recently changed jobs. Goldsmith provides insight into how past performance does not promise future results.Goldsmith discusses 20 behaviors that will stifle or derail a successful career. The habits are very common and easily recognized by others, but not necessarily by oneself. These habits are:1.Need to win at all costs.2.Desire to add our (my) two cents to every discussion.3.Need to rate others and impose our standards on them.4.Needless sarcasm and cutting remarks that we (I) think make us sound witty and wise.5.Overuse of "No," "But" or "However."6.Need to show people we (I) are (am) smarter than they think we (I) are (am.)7.Use of emotional volatility as a management tool.8.Need to share our (my) negative thoughts, even if not asked.9.Refusal to share information in order to exert an advantage.10.Inability to praise and reward.11.Annoying way in which we overestimate our (my) contribution to any success.12.Need to reposition our (my) annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it.13.Need to deflect blame from ourselves (myself) and onto events and people from our (my) past.14.Failure to see that we (I) am treating someone unfairly.15.Inability to take responsibility for our (my) actions.16.Act of not listening.17.Failure to express gratitude.18.Need to attack the innocent, even though they are usually only trying to help us (me).19.Need to blame anyone but ourselves (me).20.Excessive need to be "me."21.Goal obsession at the expense of a larger mission.He discusses each of these behaviors, how they are damaging and provides guidance and examples of how to overcome each. I found it very helpful to have the list of behaviors, as I can see myself performing some of them. That probably means I perform most of them, as it is sometimes hard to identify ones own faults. In his executive coaching, Goldsmith uses 360 degree feedback from supervisors, peers, subordinates, spouses and children to help him coach his clients.I found a couple of the methods he suggests for making changes very useful. I have talked about them on my blog. The most helpful I have employed is the coach or accountability buddy. She and I meet once a week to discuss our goals and ask for a report. This accounting has spurred me to better results than anything has before. I am meeting the intermediate steps to my goals and am feeling better about myself. Having someone to hold me responsible has been great. Doing the same for my buddy has been a rewarding experience as well. I spend time thinking about her roadblocks and ways around them. In the process, I have found solutions for myself.The other method Goldsmith talks about regularly is paying a penalty for bad behavior. He recommends a cash forfeit for every slip. After a couple hundred dollars, you WILL make a change. He knows. His staff told him about one of his foibles and he made the commitment to them to change and backed it up with money. By lunchtime, he had lost so much money, he hid in his office for the rest of the day to avoid losing more. It works. I haven't used this one yet, but I will keep it in mind should the need arise.I highly recommend this book. I will probably go back and purchase a hard copy of this book so I can make notes. I know it inspired me quite a few times to make notes while I was running - not an easy thing to do and keep up a pace. It is that kind of book. Read it with a pen and paper. You will find important things to capture.
canalrat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A do-it-yourself coaching book to help you review your career, I'm at a point of frustration and stagnation and found it particularly relevant.
damcg63 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a worthwhile - even important read if you've been a manager for a while. I recommend buying this in print because it will turn into part of your management reference library - like Drucker's "The Effective Executive". You can also get a lot of the content free at Marshal Goldsmith's web site.
librisissimo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Substance: Useful information about identifying and overcoming career-limiting personality styles and the underlying character flaws.
PointedPundit on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Had I had access to the ideas in Marshall Goldsmith¿s book years ago, I would probably be better off.At my advanced age, I have spent too much time working for myself. Sure, I recognize the importance of teams and team work. But I refer descending from my aerie, joining the team, completing the project and returning to the solace of personal contemplation Years ago, I found this works best for me.Goldsmith, an executive coach, argues in his book What Got You Here Won¿t Get You There, that success delusion, holds most of us back. We, (read I):1.Overestimate our (my) contribution to a project.2.Take credit, partial or complete, for successes that belong to others.3.Have an elevated opinion of our (my) professional skills and our (my) standing among our (my) peers.4.Ignore the failures and time-consuming dead-ends we (I) create.5.Exaggerate our (my) projects¿ impact on net profits by discounting the real and hidden costs built into them.All of these flaws are borne out of success, yet here is where the book becomes interesting. Unlike others, Goldsmith does limit himself to teaching us (me) what to do. He goes the next step. He teaches us (me) what to stop. He does not address flaws of skill, intelligence or personality. No, he addresses challenges in interpersonal behavior, those egregious everyday annoyances that make your (my) workplace more noxious that it needs to be. They are the:1.Need to win at all costs.2.Desire to add our (my) two cents to every discussion.3.Need to rate others and impose our standards on them.4.Needless sarcasm and cutting remarks that we (I) think make us sound witty and wise.5.Overuse of ¿No,¿ ¿But¿ or ¿However.¿6.Need to show people we (I) are (am) smarter than they think we (I) are (am.)7.Use of emotional volatility as a management tool.8.Need to share our (my) negative thoughts, even if not asked.9.Refusal to share information in order to exert an advantage.10.Inability to praise and reward.11.Annoying way in which we overestimate our (my) contribution to any success.12.Need to reposition our (my) annoying behavior as a permanent fixture so people excuse us for it.13.Need to deflect blame from ourselves (myself) and onto events and people from our (my) past.14.Failure to see that we (I) am treating someone unfairly.15.Inability to take responsibility for our (my) actions.16.Act of not listening.17.Failure to express gratitude.18.Need to attack the innocent, even though they are usually only trying to help us (me).19.Need to blame anyone but ourselves (me).20.Excessive need to be ¿me.¿21.Goal obsession at the expense of a larger mission.It is too late for me. I am too dysfunction. If there is still hope for you, this book is a witty, well-written start to addressing your unconscious, annoying habits that limit your ability to achieve a higher level of success.Penned by the Pointed PunditJanuary 24, 20079:38:12 PM
JerryColonna on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thanks to @chrisfralic for reminding me how good this book is. So many little gems in here that it makes me, as a coach, jealous. Among my favorites:"Emotional volatility is not the most reliable leadership tool. When you get angry, you are usually out of control. It¿s hard to lead people when you¿ve lost control. You may think you have a handle on your temper, that you can use your spontaneous rages to manipulate and motivate people. But it¿s very hard to predict how people will react to anger. They will shut down as often as they will perk up. Whenever I hear managers justify anger as a management tool, I wonder about all those other leaders who do not need anger to make their subordinates toe the line. Without anger to strike fear in the troops, how do these steady composed leaders ever get anything accomplished? But the worst thing about anger is how it stifles our ability to change. Once you get a reputation for emotional volatility, you are branded for life.""We can¿t see in ourselves what we can see so clearly in others."
djonzsr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Provides insight on how your habits may limit you and how to overcome them. Focuses on leadership roles and how you are perceived as well as improving communication skills.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Liked the book. It has good insights into what hinders most leaders/CEO of organizations and what changes they can make to improve their leadership capabilities.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is full of irony. It starts with an excessive number of blurbs extolling the expertise of the author, continues to advise the reader that s/he has a big ego problem and needs to think of others, and closes by informing the reader that author cherry-picks his clients to guarantee his success as a consultant. Are there points that will resonate with those who have experienced interactions exemplified in list of managerial flaws? Yes. Is the advice given reasonable and to the point? Yes. Will the people who really need the advice in this book every read it? Highly unlikely.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
G4GB More than 1 year ago
This is a great book to use as a small group discussion. Honest feedback to each other will provide the fuel to make positive changes in your lives.
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