The Scorpion's Tail: The Relentless Rise of Islamic Militants in Pakistan-And How It Threatens America

The Scorpion's Tail: The Relentless Rise of Islamic Militants in Pakistan-And How It Threatens America

by Zahid Hussain

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Overview

Deeply reported account of the war against Islamic extremists in Pakistan and battles being fought in the remote tribal regions.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781439120255
Publisher: Free Press
Publication date: 11/16/2010
Pages: 244
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author


Zahid Hussain is an award-winning journalist and writer, a senior editor with Newsline and a correspondent for The Times of London, Newsweek and The Wall Street Journal. He has also covered Pakistan and Afghanistan for several other international publications, including the Associated Press (AP) and The Economist. His book Frontline Pakistan: The Struggle With Militant Islam has won widespread acclaim as a seminal text on the subject. He lives in Pakistan.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

1 Witches' Brew 15

2 An Islamic State 41

3 The Perils of Appeasement 63

4 The Holy Terror 93

5 Operation Earthquake 123

6 Turning the Tide 143

7 Breaking Apart the Myth 163

8 The Scorpion's Tail 187

Conclusion 209

Notes 213

Acknowledgments 227

Index 229

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The Scorpion's Tail: The Relentless Rise of Islamic Militants in Pakistan-And How It Threatens America 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
iftyzaidi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Journalist Zahid Hussain's follow-up to Frontline Pakistan (which I read earlier this year) brings the story of the "War on Terror" up to 2010. Essentially Hussain argues that both Pakistani and American policy is seriously flawed; Pakistan for assuming that the Taliban can be divided into 'good' and 'bad' Taliban and the first coddled and America for assuming that the war can be won by 'droning' its leaders to death. The title alludes to the parable of the scorpion's tale, which, when cut off, only grows back. All in all a good read, though I only really found the last few chapters of real use. Most of the book simply rehashes the history of militancy and US/Pakistani policies which have already been covered in Frontline Pakistan and numerous other books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago