The Republic (Everyman's Library)

The Republic (Everyman's Library)

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Overview

 

Toward the end of the astonishing period of Athenian creativity that furnished Western civilization with the greater part of its intellectual, artistic, and political wealth, Plato wrote The Republic, his discussion of the nature and meaning of justice and of the ideal state and its ruler. All subsequent European thinking about these subjects owes its character, directly or indirectly, to this most famous (and most accessible) of the Platonic dialogues. Although he describes a society that looks to some like the ideal human community and to others like a totalitarian nightmare, in the course of his description Plato raises enduringly relevant questions about politics, art, education, and the general conduct of life.  The translation is by A. D. Lindsay.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780679413301
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 01/28/1993
Series: Everyman's Library
Pages: 400
Sales rank: 628,899
Product dimensions: 5.38(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Plato, with Socrates and Aristotle, is the founder of the Western intellectual tradition. Like his mentor Socrates, he was essentially a practical philosopher who found the abstract theory and visionary schemes of many contemporary thinkers misguided and sterile. He was born about 429 B.C. in Athens, the son of a prominent family that had long been involved in the city's politics. Extremely little survives of the history of Plato's youth, but he was raised in the shadow of the great Peloponnesian War, and its influence must have caused him to reject the political career open to him and to become a follower of the brilliantly unorthodox Socrates, the self-proclaimed "gadfly" of Athens.

Socrates' death in 399 B.C. turned Plato forever from politics, and in the next decade he wrote his first dialogues, among them Apology and Euthyphro. At age forty, Plato visited Italy and Syracuse, and upon his return he founded the Academy-Europe's first university-in a sacred park on the outskirts of Athens. The Academy survived for a millennium, finally closed by the emperor Justinian in A.D. 529. Plato hoped his school would train its pupils to carry out a life of service and to investigate questions of science and mathematics. Plato's old age was probably devoted to teaching and writing, he died in Athens in 348 B.C.

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The Republic 3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 33 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
do not be fooled! this book was (and still is) ages ahead of its time. there is no merely 'suspecting' that you understand this book. when you 'get it' you will 'know.' try to find an accurate translation and not one which is 'more culturally relevant today' - the idea that the Republic can be made 'culturally relevant' is all the more ridiculous considering that its implications are virtually eternal (and were meant to be). Socrates asks a lot of simple but very penetrating questions. a common and fatal error in contemporary Platonic scholarship (but even in the past) is the answering of each question (quickly) singly and missing the big picture. regardless of the historical existence of the philosophical Socrates or the historical occurence of the dialogues in the Republic, the account Plato has recorded for us in his book is among the most exact analyses of the human condition ever committed to paper. the vocabulary is not difficult, but some of the concepts will require close attention. it's better to read this book when you have some time to commit.
DustinFarris More than 1 year ago
I read this book thinking I needed to brush up on my philosophical and political history. What ended up taking place was a mind sweeping revelation that penetrated my soul. I am 26 years old and at a point in life where I seem to have many regrets, and am not certain about who I am, or where I'm going. This book penetrates the very heart of these issues and, if you allow it, can open your mind to real purpose. Oh, it has some nice government pointers too. :-) Other notes: This translation is wonderful, very easy to follow syntactically. Interesting footnotes are not overly abrasive. Just read it. There's a message in this book for everyone.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Despite those outstandingly ignorant individuals who are so willingly embarass themselves, Plato's Republic is one of the most significant works produced in our human exsitence. What's even more unique about it is its broad scope and truth that can be revealed even in our lives today. Eveyone should read it. And for those who refuse to be embarassed again, read it one more time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In 'The Republic', Plato attempts to outline an ideal society based on justice. The governemnt he suggests, however, is merely the backdrop for answering vital questions about human nature. Plato tries to define justice as well as philosophers, and argues that the just man is happier tha the unjust man. I highly recommend this book.
bookmarkaussie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this book because I thought I might find something of interest in this classic book. Well I did, but not enough to recommend it to anyone else. Much of it I found very unconvincing, the format, the arguement, the conclusions all unconvincing. The only parts that I would recommend were Part IV: The Philosopher Ruler, which is really more about the nature of reality and Part IX: Imperfect Societies, which I would rate at 4 stars and may even read again. If your interested in Philosophy, maybe read it, if your interested in history as I am, don't bother!
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To see this great work which so deeply influences the development of man and time and thought throughout the ages rated a three overall is a travesty. You are not truly educated without exploring this exceptional work with a guide of great learning and heart. This is the one book that can make you better than you were when you started the first page. Do not be deceived, this is a book of timeless relevance and soul.
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The book itself is good and this particular version is competitively priced, but just be aware that if you're buying this for a class, it has no becker numbers in the margins which make it a pain in the butt when the whole class isn't using the same book.
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