The Hunt

The Hunt

Other Format(Unabridged Library Edition)

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Overview

The Maze Runner meets Scott Westerfeld in the second novel in this gripping and romantic series about teens abducted from Earth by an otherworldly race—from Megan Shepherd, the New York Times bestselling author of The Madman’s Daughter series.

They’ve left the cage—but they’re not free yet.

After their failed escape attempt, Cora, Lucky, and Mali have been demoted to the lowest level of human captives and placed in a safari-themed environment called the Hunt, along with wild animals and other human outcasts. They must serve new Kindred masters—Cora as a lounge singer, Lucky as an animal wrangler, and Mali as a safari guide—and follow new rules or face dangerous consequences. Meanwhile, Nok and Rolf have been moved into an enormous dollhouse, observed around the clock by Kindred scientists interested in Nok’s pregnancy. And Leon, the only one who successfully escaped, has teamed up with villainous Mosca black-market traders.

The former inhabitants of the Cage are threatened on all fronts—and maybe worst of all, one of the Hunt’s Kindred safari guests begins to play a twisted game of cat and mouse with Cora. Separated and constantly under watch, she and the others must struggle to stay alive, never mind find a way back to each other. When Cassian secretly offers to train Cora to develop her psychic abilities—to prove the worthiness of humanity in a series of tests called the Gauntlet—she’ll have to decide fast if she dares to trust the Kindred who betrayed her, or if she can forge her own way to freedom.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781504735889
Publisher: Blackstone Pub
Publication date: 05/24/2016
Series: Cage , #2
Edition description: Unabridged Library Edition
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 1.25(h) x 9.00(d)
Age Range: 13 - 17 Years

About the Author

Megan Shepherd grew up in her family’s independent bookstore in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The travel bug took her from London to Timbuktu and many places in between, though she ended up back in North Carolina with her husband, two cats, and a scruffy dog, and she wouldn’t want to live anywhere else. She is the author of the Madman’s Daughter and Cage trilogies. Visit her online at www.meganshepherd.com.

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The Hunt 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I liked the first one, loved the second and now im angry I have to wait for the third
Spuncky More than 1 year ago
TheThoughtSpot More than 1 year ago
The Hunt by Megan Shepherd is the sequel to The Cage where humans are treated like displays for the entertainment of an otherworldly race. The characters become more dynamic and, after their escape attempt, have been placed in different settings. Cora is now a singer, others are dancers, a dollhouse family and some are placed as prey in a hunt. All of the captured are trying to work together to escape the planet and get to Earth. Cora has developed telekinesis and Cassian believes that Cora can beat the Gauntlet and prove that humans are intelligent. Cora is thrown into the hunt and she discovers a surprise about her predator. Using her telekinetic abilities, she kills him and Cassian takes the blame. The group escapes for Earth only to decide they need to save Cassian because he's the only one who has a strong hope for humanity. The loyalty and action kept me reading this sci-fi dystopian and I am looking forward to The Gauntlet, the third book of the series, because of the four sets of puzzles that will be presented to the captured to prove that humans are sentient beings worthy of freedom; 4 stars!
WhatsBeyondForks More than 1 year ago
This is a series that must be read in order. You're given multiple point of views through this book, so you know where each character ended up after the failed escape attempt of book one. I feel like the characters are in a stronger form of survival mode now. They're thinking of home, and how to get back, and how to just survive. They're not just going with the flow anymore. There was some action and you get a good look at many things going on within this world(s), but I also found myself drifting at times.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You can not put down this book it is to good. I recomend you read it
thelonereader More than 1 year ago
The Hunt is the second book in Megan Shepard's The Cage series, and if you've been following me as I've reviewed books from blog to blog, you'll know that I loved the first book in the series. The plot twist at the end right about killed me, I was in love with the main love interest, Cassian, and everything was fine and good (and also not good because Cora and the gang were, you know, stuck on space and stuff). But the point is that it was wonderful, and I felt about it much like I did about Shepard's debut novel, The Madman's Daughter. Now, I've begun to notice that I form a sort of pattern with Megan Shepard's trilogies, apparently. I fall in love fast and hard with the first book in the series, and obsess over it forever. Then, when the second book comes around, it takes me a bit of a while to get to it, and it also takes me a bit of a while to read it. In the end I acknowledge it was good, but for some reason it just didn't hook me like the first book. The third book of this series hasn't even come out yet, but I never actually got to the third book in The Madman's Daughter series, so hopefully that won't happen to this series as well. But you never really know. Anyways, with this book we're still on step two of my Megan Shepard book habits, so yes I admit that it was a good book and can think fondly of it, but while I was reading I didn't know what to feel. So here's what The Hunt did not succeed in accomplishing: 1. Making me re-fall fast and hard in love with Cassian. I thought I felt absolutely nothing for him at the beginning, but after a while I started to like him again. He's definitely an interesting character and I'd love to read more about him, but I definitely don't feel for him (yet) what I did in the first installment. 2. Remembering who was who and what exactly went wrong at the end of book one. I got the general gist of things but pretty much had to wing it at the beginning until I finally figured out who was who as I continued reading. 3. Being totally interested in the multiple perspectives and what was happening to everyone who was not Cora. Though eventually I got used to it and didn't mind it, so it was fine. 4. Being extremely eager for the next book and just having to know what happens next. Like I said, I'm very aware of how good a book this is, but I'm just not into the genre at the moment and am not sure how invested I really am in all of the characters and their plight. However, I would like to see some more Cassian-Cora interactions, so I might just find myself reading - and most likely loving - the final book in the trilogy. However, other than that, this book was a worthy sequel to The Cage. Once I became comfortable with the characters and the world again, it was easy to root for the characters as well as worry a surprising amount for Cassian's well-being. I can definitely see the parallels between my feelings toward this second book and the second book in The Cage series, but I'm just going to hope for the best. But if you really enjoyed the first book in this trilogy and don't suffer from the same unusual Megan Shepard book pattern that I do, then go ahead and continue to this book, because you will love it. Read more reviews at: http://www.the-lone-reader-blog.blogspot.com
Alyssa75 More than 1 year ago
***Review posted on The Eater of Books! blog*** The Hunt by Megan Shepherd Book Two of The Cage series Publisher: Balzer + Bray Publication Date: May 24, 2016 Rating: 4 stars Source: eARC from Edelweiss Summary (from Goodreads): They’ve left the cage—but they’re not free yet. After their failed escape attempt, Cora, Lucky, and Mali have been demoted to the lowest level of human captives and placed in a safari-themed environment called the Hunt, along with wild animals and other human outcasts. They must serve new Kindred masters—Cora as a lounge singer, Lucky as an animal wrangler, and Mali as a safari guide—and follow new rules or face dangerous consequences. Meanwhile, Nok and Rolf have been moved into an enormous dollhouse, observed around the clock by Kindred scientists interested in Nok’s pregnancy. And Leon, the only one who successfully escaped, has teamed up with villainous Mosca black-market traders. The former inhabitants of the Cage are threatened on all fronts—and maybe worst of all, one of the Hunt’s Kindred safari guests begins to play a twisted game of cat and mouse with Cora. Separated and constantly under watch, she and the others must struggle to stay alive, never mind find a way back to each other. When Cassian secretly offers to train Cora to develop her psychic abilities—to prove the worthiness of humanity in a series of tests called the Gauntlet—she’ll have to decide fast if she dares to trust the Kindred who betrayed her, or if she can forge her own way to freedom. What I Liked: In my opinion, this is Shepherd's best published book. I gave all of her other books three stars each, my absolute least favorite probably being Her Dark Curiosity (gosh that book was a mess). I liked The Cage more than I liked any of her debut trilogy's books, but I didn't connected with the characters. I'm not sure what it is about Shepherd's books that keep me coming back, but in this case, I don't regret it. The Hunt is my favorite Shepherd book, and her best to date. At the end of The Cage, Cora and the other humans tried to escape from the Cage, but they failed. Now split up, they must survive the horror in front of them. Cora is taken to a menagerie called The Hunt, where she sings. Lucky is placed an animal wrangler at the menagerie. Pregnant Nok and Rolf are taken to a facility where they are watched 24/7 by the Kindred, who want to see how typical humans raise a baby. Leon escaped successfully, and has pledged himself to work for a dangerous Mosca. Cora has been working with Cassian to strengthen her telekinetic abilities, in order to enter a game that might free the humans. Cassian is no longer a foe to worry about - the dangers outside the Cage are much greater than Cora and the other humans imagined. This book is written in the perspectives of the different humans that we met in book one. Specifically, Cora, Lucky, Leon, Mali, Rolf. Usually I don't like multiple POVs (more than two, meaning), because authors tend to scatter events and interrupt key scenes and it's just too much going on. But I really liked how the author crafted this story, with the POVs she decided to include. All of them are in third-person. Cora is clearly the most important protagonist, but I think each of the other POVs were just as necessary. Read the rest of my review on my blog, The Eater of Books! - eaterofbooks DOT blogspot DOT com :)