The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy & Baby Care: Revised & Updated Edition

The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy & Baby Care: Revised & Updated Edition

by Good Housekeeping

Paperback(REV)

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Overview

Mothers-to-be and new moms will be glad to know that the bestselling Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy and Baby Care is finally in paperback, updated to include topical advice and information about amniocentesis, car safety for infants and toddlers, growth charts, and the recommended schedule for immunizations. Mothers-to-be and new moms will be glad to know that the bestselling Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy and Baby Care is finally in paperback, updated to include topical advice and information about amniocentesis, car safety for infants and toddlers, growth charts, and the recommended schedule for immunizations. Eight hundred instructive and appealing color photographs fill the pages of the most complete parenting guide ever published. Part One tells a pregnant woman how to take the best care of herself so her baby will get a great start in life. The second section provides commonsense solutions to parenting problems and concerns. And, finally, there's a straightforward hands-on guide to childhood illnesses and first aid. An extensive index makes it easy to find exactly what you need in a flash. Mothers-to-be and new moms will be glad to know that the bestselling Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy and Baby Care is finally in paperback, updated to include topical advice and information about amniocentesis, car safety for infants and toddlers, growth charts, and the recommended schedule for immunizations. Eight hundred instructive and appealing color photographs fill the pages of the most complete parenting guide ever published. Part One tells a pregnant woman how to take the best care of herself so her baby will get a great start in life. The second section provides commonsense solutions to parenting problems and concerns. And, finally, there's a straightforward hands-on guide to childhood illnesses and first aid. An extensive index makes it easy to find exactly what you need in a flash.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781588163769
Publisher: Hearst
Publication date: 11/28/2004
Series: Good Housekeeping Series
Edition description: REV
Pages: 256
Product dimensions: 8.50(w) x 10.88(h) x 0.75(d)

Read an Excerpt

MAKING UP YOUR BABY'S BOTTLE

In the early weeks you need to have a supply of bottles ready in the refrigerator so that whenever your baby cries, wanting to be fed, you can respond quickly and easily. Until your baby is at least nine months old, give him an infant formula. Most are modified cow's milk. Your pediatrician will help you choose a brand. You can upset your baby by switching brands, so never do so without professional advice.

Infant formula is most commonly and cheaply available as concentrated liquid or powder that can readily be mixed up as required. The instructions on the cans tell you the correct amount of liquid or number of scoops to add to each measure of water. It is very important to maintain these proportions exactly. If you add too much formula, the feeding will be dangerously concentrated: your baby may gain too much weight, and his kidneys may be damaged. If you consistently add too little powder, he may gain weight too slowly and eventually could become malnourished. The only occasion on which it is correct to dilute formula concentrations is when your baby brings up most of his feeding but shows no other signs of illness. Then, for the next few days, dilute the formula (see Vomiting, page 179). If your baby is not vomiting, follow the directions and allow him to take as much as he wants at each feeding.

Always use fresh, cold tap water to make up your baby's formula, and boil it once only. Some types of water should never be used:

  • water that has been repeatedly boiled, or left standing in the kettle for more than an hour ortwo
  • water from a tap with a domestic softener attached —the extra sodium (salt) can damage your baby's kidneys
  • water from a tap with a domestic filter attached - these filters can trap harmful bacteria

Ready-to-feed formula

Some brands of infant formula are also available ready-mixed in cans. You need add no water. If the formula you are feeding your baby comes in this form, then you have a very convenient option. The formula in the cans has been ultra-heat treated (UHT), so it's already sterile. Store unopened cans in a cool place, and do not use after the "expiration" date. Once opened, the formula can be stored in the refrigerator for up to 24 hours, either in a sterile, sealed bottle, or in the can, which must be covered. But unless you can be sure that you won't forget when you put the can in the refrigerator, it's probably safer to pour all the formula into clean, ready to use bottles. Throw away any he doesn't drink after each feeding.

How much will my baby want?

Babies' appetites vary from day to day. During the first weeks of life put 4fl. oz. (125m1.) of formula into each of six bottles, and see how that matches your baby's appetite. As he gains weight, he will often cry for more at the end of a feeding, so gradually increase the amount you put into each bottle. By the time he is six months old you will be making up bottles of 7fl. oz. (200ml.). As a rough guide, your baby needs about 2-1/2fl. oz. of formula per pound (150ml. per kg.) of body weight every 24 hours. So if a 12lb. (5.5kg.) baby is on sixfeedings a day, he may take about 5fl. oz. (140ml.) of formula at each feeding.

Demand vs scheduled bottles

It takes weeks and often months for babies to settle into predictable feeding schedules.At first, your baby may be hungry every half hour, then every two, three, or four hours. In years past, mothers were advised to follow strict four-hour feeding schedules, withholding bottles until the appointed hour had arrived. Nowadays, both pediatricians and mothers take a softer approach and believe that babies should take the lead as far as schedules are concerned. By ten weeks, most babies are close to an eating pattern of every three or four hours. If your baby is cranky right after draining a full bottle or within an hour, try burping her or offering some cool, sterile water in a bottle.

Should I give anything else?

Most bottle-fed babies don't need anything but formula for the first six months of life. Some doctors recommend vitamin and mineral supplements or additional fluoride, but do check first. Too many vitamins can make your baby sick.

The majority of doctors and the American Academy of Pediatrics generally suggest holding off on solid foods until at least five or six months of age. You may be tempted to try some cereal in your baby's diet if he appears not to be satisfied with just formula, but until he can let you know that he wants more or less food, pushing solids can amount to force-feeding, so be patient.

Copyright ) 1990 by Dorling Kindersley Limited, London

Table of Contents

1Pregnancy and Birth8
Thinking About Pregnancy10
A Pregnancy Calendar12
Prenatal Care32
Common Complaints40
Keeping Fit and Relaxed43
Eating for a Healthy Baby50
Practical Preparations54
Labor and Birth56
Your New Baby68
Getting Back to Normal71
2Baby Care74
The First Weeks of Life76
Handling Your Baby82
Feeding Your Baby87
Breast-Feeding Your Baby90
Bottle-Feeding Your Baby98
Introducting Solid Food108
Crying and Your Baby117
Sleep and Your Baby120
Clothes and Dressing128
Bathing and Washing Your Baby134
Diapers and Diaper Changing146
Giving Up Diapers154
Taking Your Baby Out156
Growing and Learning158
Becoming a Person168
3Health Care172
The First Three Months174
Diagnosis Guide180
First Signs of Illness182
Going Into the Hospital185
The Child With a Fever186
All About Medicines189
Caring for a Sick Child192
Colds and Flu194
Having Your Child Immunized196
Infectious Illnesses197
Eye Problems202
Ear Problems204
Mouth Infections206
Throat Infections207
Coughs and Chest Infections208
Stomach Pain212
Constipation, Vomiting, and Diarrhea213
Bladder, Kidney, and Genital Problems216
Skin Problems218
Fainting, Dizziness, and Convulsions225
Your Child's Safety226
First Aid229
Growth Charts246
Index250
Acknowledgments256

Customer Reviews

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The Good Housekeeping Illustrated Book of Pregnancy & Baby Care: Revised & Updated Edition 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this book for a sister who is pregnant for the first time. Seventeen years back, I had bought an earlier version for my husband and I when I was pregnant with my first child. The book has pictures showing the changes that your body and your baby are going through at each week of pregnancy and for the first few years of your baby's life. This is the only pregnancy book that I know that is illustrated and is not full of small print. I had bought the book "what to expect when you are expecting" years back, but did not read it past the first few pages. I could even get my husband to sit and enjoy the book, which is saying something.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I bought this for my daughter & son in law (first time parents) bec. I thought it was easy to read, very informative & has great pictures & pertinent tips re when to seek medical attention. A few things are no longer pertinent i.e bringing change to the hospital for phone calls), overall it is a good information source.
Guest More than 1 year ago
After receiving several baby books that were not getting me the information I wanted, I stumbled upon this book. LOVE IT. Not only does it give you baby information, it walks you through each week of pregnancy with pictures and things to expect. It gives you check lists for the hospital and information for children much longer than newborns. I have purchased this book for about 5 of my friends over the years because of the great job it did for me. You won't be disappointed.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was incredibly helpful. It tells how you are feeling, what stages the baby is in. What to Expect When You're Expecting didn't really help me, but this truly fit the bill. And it had a lot of information on how to care for your baby. Excellent for any first time mother!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book has too many graphic photos to have in a household with children. I am the mother of 3, with a 4th on the way. This book gives only the basics of info on pregnancy and is not very user friendly. The baby care section is very, very detailed - too much so for anyone who has ever handled a baby. The health care section was fair. I would recommend looking for a different book.