The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles

The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles

by Paul B. Janeczko

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Overview

"A wealth of information in an engaging package." — Kirkus Reviews

Ever since George Washington used them to help topple the British, spies and their networks have helped and hurt America at key moments in history. In this fascinating collection, Paul B. Janeczko probes examples from clothesline codes to surveillance satellites and cyber espionage. Colorful personalities, daring missions, the feats of the loyal, and the damage of traitors are interspersed with a look at the technological advances that continue to change the rules of gathering intelligence.
Back matter includes source notes and a bibliography.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780763662097
Publisher: Candlewick Press
Publication date: 09/11/2012
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Lexile: 1200L (what's this?)
File size: 8 MB
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Paul B. Janeczko (1945–2019) was a poet and teacher who edited numerous award-winning poetry anthologies for young people, including A Poke in the I, A Kick in the Head, A Foot in the Mouth, and The Death of the Hat, all of which were illustrated by Chris Raschka; Firefly July, illustrated by Melissa Sweet; and The Proper Way to Meet a Hedgehog and Other How-To Poems, illustrated by Richard Jones. He also wrote Worlds Afire; Requiem: Poems of the Terezín Ghetto; Top Secret: A Handbook of Codes, Ciphers, and Secret Writing; Double Cross: Deception Techniques in War; The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles, a finalist for the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults; and Secret Soldiers: How the U.S. Twenty-Third Special Troops Fooled the Nazis.


Paul B. Janeczko (1945–2019) was a poet and teacher who edited numerous award-winning poetry anthologies for young people, including A Poke in the I, A Kick in the Head, A Foot in the Mouth, and The Death of the Hat, all of which were illustrated by Chris Raschka; Firefly July, illustrated by Melissa Sweet; and The Proper Way to Meet a Hedgehog and Other How-To Poems, illustrated by Richard Jones. He also wrote Worlds Afire; Requiem: Poems of the Terezín Ghetto; Top Secret: A Handbook of Codes, Ciphers, and Secret Writing; Double Cross: Deception Techniques in War; The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles, a finalist for the YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults; and Secret Soldiers: How the U.S. Twenty-Third Special Troops Fooled the Nazis.



I didn’t start out to be a writer. I started out as a kid in New Jersey who had two major goals in life: (1) survive one more year of delivering newspapers without being attacked by Ike, the one-eyed, crazed cur that lurked in the forsythia bushes at the top of the hill; and (2) become more than a weak-hitting, third-string catcher on our sorry Little League team. I failed at both.
Had I announced at the dinner table, “Mom, Dad, I’ve decided to be a poet,” my parents—especially my mother—would have been thrilled. In truth, they would have been thrilled that I’d decided to be anything other than a Top 40 disc jockey, Edsel salesman, or bullpen catcher I constantly talked about becoming in junior high.

But at that point in my life, poetry—and school, in general, for that matter—meant no more to me than gerunds, the Belgian Congo, or George Washington’s wooden teeth. I was only “gifted” on Christmas and my birthday. I didn’t like school. I did as little homework as possible. I participated in class only under duress from the nuns. Before sixth grade, I wasn’t even much of a reader. My reading was limited largely to baseball magazines, the daily sports page—usually carefully read over a chocolate egg cream in the local candy store—and the backs of baseball cards old and new. I was captivated by those color pictures of men wearing five o’clock shadows and baggy pants.

Luckily for me, however, I discovered the Hardy Boys. Frank and Joe set me straight about the joys of reading. Somehow I made it through high school and I even found one college that would take me. That’s when my life changed. At college I was with kids who had read books I hadn’t read, knew about plays that I’d never heard of, and could talk about music, literature, and the arts. That was when I realized how much time I had wasted in high school. That’s when it dawned on me that it was time for me to start learning.

After college, where I actually did quite well, I headed to graduate school and then started teaching. I taught high-school English for twenty-two years in Ohio, Massachusetts, and Maine. I left the classroom in 1990, when my daughter was born. I’ve been fortunate to have published nearly fifty books.

I usually spend about thirty-five days each year visiting schools. Over the past twenty years I have visited hundreds of schools from Maine to Alaska and even in Europe. When I’m not visiting schools, I’m usually in my office in my home in the foothills of western Maine working on books.

Three Things You Might Not Know About Me:

1. High on my list of things-that-drive-me-nuts are socks that don’t stay up, drivers who don’t signal, and the Red Sox losing to the Yankees.

2. I walk a few miles, meditate, and do yoga nearly every day.

3. My wife wishes I would keep the door to my office shut because she thinks the room is an incredible mess. I prefer to think of it is as exhibiting creative chaos. A little chaos is good.

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The Dark Game: True Spy Stories from Invisible Ink to CIA Moles 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
MStevenson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Award-winning poet and storyteller Paul Janeczko explores his fascination with the shadowy world of espionage throughout history. This collection of true spy stories includesGeneral Washington's network that helped win the American Revolutionary War, Elizabeth Van Lew's intelligence gathering during the Civil War, Mata Hari the double agent, and the incredible engineering involved in digging a tunnel into East Berlin during the Cold War. Profiles of colorful persoanalities, daring missions, the feats of the loyal and the damage of traitors and moles are interspersed with information about the technological advances such as cyber espionage that continue to change the rules of gathering intelligence. Cryptology basics and other intelligence-gathering techniques are revisited but the main focus is on the spies themselves. The intriguing mysteries will draw in avid and reluctant readers alike , and the appended source notes and bibliography will bolster the curricular appeal.
skyler.sims on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The book was about the many spies the world has seen. From the 1700's Benedict Arnold to the Cold Wars attemp to sabatage Soviet on the Berlin wall. During war they need anything to get the advatage so these spies risk there lives go throught sever training to serve their country. It tells of a Nazi plan to unite with Mexico and capture America. A sabatage on America during WWII and the gut turning tales of war. Benadict Arnold the worlds most infamous traitor and the details of his trechary. The many attempts to sabatage the Soviet territory in the Cold War. This book is great.This book is a good true story novel. It shows the risk of being a spy. The author got great in the details and really showed the real world of spy's. Not just the 007 movies but the stories that inspired the movies. This is a great story about the spies and what they do in the real world. This is a good reference in studing spys and the influeced the world. The secret life of spys is shown in this book. I would enchorage you to read it.
KarenBall on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Teenage spy thrillers like the Alex Rider and Cherub series are always popular -- everyone loves the action, danger and derring-do in those stories! Paul Janeczko has researched and collected the stories of American spies through history, from the Revolutionary War days up to modern times. Did you know that George Washington, First President, was also our First Spymaster? It was his ability to recruit and use spies that gave him the information he needed to win battles, and eventually the war! During the Civil War, some of the most successful spies were women and African Americans, including Harriet Tubman. I love that this isn't just a story of various spies -- it's also about the ways they encoded information and got that information to their contacts. The right kind of underwear hanging on a clothesline was a signal for one spy! Janeczko includes the story of invisible ink, and how official ID papers and money for spies had to be aged so they would be believable. The history of secret codes includes the American soldiers who created the first unbreakable secret code during World War I, using their native Choctaw language. World War II featured Navajo codetalkers, who followed in their footsteps. Spy cameras, hidden listening devices, and secret tunnels all get a turn in this book too! Exciting storytelling with rich detail, historical photos and images of spy-related primary source documents make this a fascinating trip through many secretive events and people in our history. Strong 6th grade readers and up.
fanchon33 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book was a fantastic review of different spies both for and against the U.S. throughout history from the Revolutionary War to the Cold War. The book has many different sub-sections in each chapter that highlight certain people or groups. It also has great examples of different methods of code used (invisible ink, codebooks, ciphers, etc). I thought I would learn a little bit about certain spies, but I learned so much more. Well worth the read.
YoungMensanBookParade More than 1 year ago
The Dark Game by Paul B. Janeczko Did you know George Washington established the first spy network in the country? Well, I do because I read The Dark Games! The Dark Game is an exciting compilation of exciting short historical stories, rich with detail. Historical photos and images of spy-related documents enhance the overall picture the book creates making it a must read. It is a fascinating trip through many secretive events and the people who helped create them in history. It also illustrates the growth of technology in espionage well. From the Culper Ring to present day, each short story has something to offer. My favorite story was the part about the Culper Ring, which I thought was very interesting because of the varying techniques they used. This is an outstanding book I would recommend for any history buff, young and old. I put it on my favorite reads list! By Carson P., age 11, Mensa of Wisconsin
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good book.