The Complete Idiot's Guide to The Bible

The Complete Idiot's Guide to The Bible

Audiobook(Cassette - Unabridged, 4 cassettes, 6 hours)

$25.99
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Overview

This audio walks both experienced Bible readers and those seeking it out for the first time through a chronological, story-by-story and person-by-person experience.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781589268180
Publisher: Oasis Audio
Publication date: 11/01/2004
Series: Complete Idiot's Guide Series
Edition description: Unabridged, 4 cassettes, 6 hours
Product dimensions: 4.46(w) x 6.96(h) x 1.13(d)

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The Complete Idiot's Guide to the Bible 3.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
JAM42 More than 1 year ago
Many times I have set out to read the Bible from cover to cover. I almost always got bogged down in Deuteromony. A basic knowledge of the Bible is necessary to be culurally literate. In everyday language, biblical phrases and stories abound. This book makes it possible for people of all ages and faiths to read and enjoy the essence of the Bible. It reads like a narrative but adds litte asides of interesting cultural, linguistic or geographical tidbits tha enhance the story. I particularly enjoy the section titles that seem to capture the key point of the story in a few clever and sometimes delightfully sarcastic words. This alone keeps the reader going. Although some parts of the Bible are not included in the narraive, they are not key to understanding the message and the writer points to them for those who want to pursue more thorough study. The writer includes a preview and a "key points to remember" for each section. This is a very helpful technique. The author did an exellent job of picking out the essential learnings so that the reader is not overwhelmed. Kind of like the study guide for an imaginary test. This book can be used as a stand alone, or read alongside the Bible itself. It is not a translation of Biblial text, nor is it intended to be a study guide. It is not a paraphrase. It is more of a story of the stories of the Bible. Therefore it is a perfect venue for seasoned Bible study veterans who want to relax and take a bird's eye view. It is also suitable for readers who want to know about the Bible as literature and might even be great tool for a college literature class. Those who embrace Christianity as their faith but who are somtimes embarrased by lack of knowledge of the Bible might find this to be a great resource. Young people would find it easy reading while the tongue-in-cheek remarks and witty subtitles make it interesting. I highly recommend this book to people of all faiths and all ages.
sergerca on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This refers to the audio version of this book read by John Ratzenberger.If you want to know the basic outline of the Bible, this book will serve that purpose. I am in no way a biblical scholar so I have no way of knowing if there were major parts left out, but the stories everyone is familiar with are here. I have a few critiques:There is almost no historical context. Even when introducing people like Darius there isn't even an explanation as to when this occurred or what else was going on in the region at the time. This would have provided some extra insight into the story.The authors claim to be objective, but certainly come from an Evangelical point of view. They do not even acknowledge the Apocrypha exists, let alone include it in their summary. Also, they tend to quote the verses often quoted by Evangelicals and ignore verses that support Catholic theology. There is no, "You are Peter and upon this rock I will build my church." I don't recall hearing any of the verses that are used in the Hail Mary. Neither is the verse from James about "not by faith alone" present. Speaking of James, they flatly state that he is the brother of Jesus. That will come as a shock to anyone who believes that Mary remained a virgin and knows that the Aramaic word for "brother" has broader meanings that include "cousin" and "relative." This presumption by the authors flies in the face of 2000 years of tradition to which more than a billion Catholics (and a lot of Protestants) subscribe.An acknowledgement about some of the differences of biblical structure and interpretation that exist between the major segments of Christianity would have been a more honest way to write this book. Especially if you assume that a book like this will mostly be read by biblical novices who may not know that some great differences exist.
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