The Cat Who Went to Heaven

The Cat Who Went to Heaven

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Overview

A Newberry Medal Winner

This timeless fable has been a classic since its first publication in 1930, and this beautifully reillustrated edition brings the magic and wonder of the tale to a new generation of readers.

In ancient Japan, a struggling artist is angered when his housekeeper brings home a tiny white cat he can barely afford to feed. But when the village’s head priest commissions a painting of the Buddha for a healthy sum, the artist softens toward the animal he believes has brought him luck.

According to legend, the proud and haughty cat was denied the Buddha’s blessing for refusing to accept his teachings and pay him homage. So when the artist, moved by compassion for his pet, includes the cat in his painting, the priest rejects the work and decrees that it must be destroyed. It seems the artist’s life is ruined as well—until he is rewarded for his act of love by a Buddhist miracle.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781416949732
Publisher: Aladdin
Publication date: 01/08/2008
Pages: 96
Sales rank: 214,353
Product dimensions: 5.12(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile: 1000L (what's this?)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

Customer Reviews

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The Cat Who Went to Heaven 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
LemaMichelle More than 1 year ago
Heaven Sent ! Fantastic story about a beautiful and devoted feline. This classic tale of the miracle of Buddha shows the devotion of a sweet human-like cat that simply wants to please her master. Although master and housekeeper are poor and starving, this cuddly feline puts her emotions and hunger last so her master can be happy. All throughout this book you see a softer side of cats. Having two spoiled self-satisfying cats myself, it's wonderful yet out of the ordinary to witness a cat putting her master first. Wonderful story of the devotion and love between a man and his Good Fortune. With the reputation of this artist at stake, the love he has for the "goblin" of a creature outweighs the consequences he faces if he loses her. I truly learned to appreciate cats a little more.
Sworddove More than 1 year ago
I don't care how old you are, this is a fairy tale that everyone can enjoy. I first read this in junior high school and searched many years before finally finding it again. It was just as enjoyable a read at the age of 40 as it was at age 12 and just as heartbreaking. I cried the same as the first time I read it. This is truely a timeless treasure that should be required reading in everyones library. The lessons are as timely and true today as when it was first published in 1930. Enjoy!
EllieStarfish More than 1 year ago
This book was very good it had suprises popping out everywhere you never could tell what was going to happen next.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This short tale, which won the 1931 Newberry Medal for best contribution to American children's literature, is about a poor artist in Japan who is commissioned to paint a picture of Buddha's death. The story teaches children a little about Buddhism and about the concept of reincarnation. The artist paints pictures of the animals coming to be blessed by Buddha. But, legend said that cats never came. The artist's cat, Good Fortune, wishes to be included in the painting. Finally, the artist relents and Good Fortune dies from joy. But the priests now no longer want the painting since it doesn't agree with legend. The next day, however, they change their minds when a 'miracle' occurs. Coatsworth was well-known for her children's stories and this short story is one of the classics of children literature.
Guest More than 1 year ago
as a cat person i found that this book is 1 book that i can read my cats as they sleep at night. it is a great book that tells ledgens of the animals that helped buduh. i found that it brought a teer to the end but it also brought a smile. the only problem is that it was short.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Taking an interest in my 6th-grade daughter's Newbery Medal book project, I read this wonderful little book in less than an hour. The most interesting parts of the book focus on Buddha's legends as he was transformed into different animals and the experiences - and lessons - the author relays. Definitely a must-read for cat fans, but anyone would enjoy this tale about a man's attitude changing about cats through his "visitor," Good Fortune.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was really amazing. It's so emotional and a must buy for anyone who loves asia and its culture.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This has been my favourite children's book since I was a child. It is, quite simply, beautiful: a more than worthwhile read, whether one is a child, an adult, or somewhere in between. The story - of an artist and his cat -- is elegantly told, and the illustrations match in quality.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is such a great book. I read it when I was about 7 and I still love it. I recomend it to everyone!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This was a great little book, plain and simple. Read it one afternoon.
sablelexi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a very short story, that was written in the 1930s. I read it when I was in elementary school some 20 years ago, and yet I still remember he story so clearly. The story not only stuck with me all these years but it still has the power to make me tear up a bit. I think that this is a great story for any animal lover, and would happily recommend it to everyone.
whitnihatfield on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the story of a starving artist who is given a cat from his housekeeper instead of food. He is angry at first, but then thinks that the cat is lucky and names him Good Fortune. A high priest from their town came to him soon after he decided to keep Good Fortune. He wanted the artist to paint the death of Buddha. There were many animals that were present at the time of his death, all except the cat. Good Fortune seems to ask if he would put a cat in the picture, but the cat is the only animal that Buddha did not allow into heaven. Will the artist risk losing his much needed money to help his new friend enter the picture and possibly heaven?This is a cute story and it is very visual. I don't know how parents would react to the students learn about Buddha. It was a cute story with a lot of visual aids and wonderful descriptions. I enjoyed the book overall, but I didn't know how some parents would react to the Buddha aspect in the story.I would use this story if we were doing a unit on different countries, such as Japan. If we cover different religions and different regions, this would be a good story to read while we study the regions or religions and customs.
MissTeacher on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very sweet and educational story about a cat who blesses the life of a poor Japanese artist. Full of stories about the connections between the Buddha and the animals of the world, The Cat Who Went to Heaven is also a charming tale about the ability to redeem oneself no matter what. Children will like it's sweet message and repetitive, story-book air; older students will benefit from its message. A great tool to teach about Buddhist principles, history, or simply the qualities of compassion, redemption, humility and correct thought.
miketroll on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A charming children's story of some depth, to be savoured and re-read.
avcr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A Japanese housekeeper goes to market but instead of bringing back food she returns with a beautiful little white cat, with a tail like a bunny and yellow and black spots on her sides. She is gentle, good mannered and prays to Buddha and appears to truly bring good luck. Soon after her arrival, one of the local Priests comes to the artist¿s house and commissions a portrait of Buddha (his name was the only one left in the basket). The artist transcends through the life of Siddhartha/Buddha and as he contemplates the animal forms Buddha has taken he learns sympathy, compassion, and sacrifice for others. The cat blesses the artist and in return the cat is blessed. If You Liked This, Try: The Dark Frigate by Charles Boardman Hawes, Gay Neck: The Story of a Pigeon by Dhan Gopal Mukerji, Smoky The Cow Horse by Will James, Hitty Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field, Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey. If You Liked This, Try: The Dark Frigate by Charles Boardman Hawes, Gay Neck: The Story of a Pigeon by Dhan Gopal Mukerji, Smoky The Cow Horse by Will James, Hitty Her First Hundred Years by Rachel Field, Miss Hickory by Carolyn Sherwin Bailey. Awards: Newbery, 1931
debnance on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This story was a lovely little folk tale that reminded me of all the best of the Newbery books. A young man has been commissioned by the temple to paint a picture of Buddha as he blesses the animals. He slowly adds animals, telling the tale and the strength of each. Then the artist comes to the cat, an animal which had, by tradition, rejected the Buddha and thus was excluded from heaven. But it is the artist's cat that has inspired him in his work and the artist knows it is the cat's greatest wish to be included in the painting. At last, the artist makes the difficult decision to include the cat in the painting. The ending is surprising and lovely.
tjsjohanna on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a sweet fable-like story. There is a nice introduction to the life of Buddha and a pleasing resolution to the problem of the cat. I also enjoyed the setting - it was believable without hitting me over the head that this was a foreign country. The illustrations for this version were also beautiful - particularly the animals.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I probally won't get this book because of the title.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This short tale, which won the 1931 Newbery Medal for best contribution to American children's literature, is about a poor artist in Japan who is commissioned to paint a picture of Buddha's death. The story teaches children a little about Buddhism and about the concept of reincarnation. The artist paints pictures of the animals coming to be blessed by Buddha. But, legend said that cats never came. The artist's cat, Good Fortune, wishes to be included in the painting. Finally, the artist relents and Good Fortune dies from joy. But the priests now no longer want the painting since it doesn't agree with legend. The next day, however, they change their minds when a 'miracle' occurs.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Cat Who Went To Heaven is an easy reading story about a little cat who watches over his master's shoulder as his master paints. He paints nearly every creature great and small, but why doesn't he paint a cat? A wonderful story, gently told, and full of love.