The Birth of Tragedy and On the Genealogy of Morals

The Birth of Tragedy and On the Genealogy of Morals

Paperback(1st Anchor Books Edition)

$13.00
Choose Expedited Shipping at checkout for guaranteed delivery by Friday, August 23

Overview

Skillful, sophisticated translations of two of Nietzsche's essential works about the conflict between the moral and aesthetic approaches to life, the impact of Christianity on human values, the meaning of science, the contrast between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, and other themes central to his thinking.

The Birth of Tragedy (1872) was Nietzsche's first book, The Geneology of Morals  (1887) one of his last.  Though they span the career of this controversial genius, both address the problems such as the conflict between the moral versus aesthetic approaches to life, the effect of Christianity on human values, the meaning of science, and the famous dichotomy between the Apollonian and Dionysian spirits, among many themes which Nietzsche struggled throughout his tortured life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780385092104
Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
Publication date: 05/28/1956
Edition description: 1st Anchor Books Edition
Pages: 320
Sales rank: 348,740
Product dimensions: 5.20(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.71(d)

About the Author

Friedrich Nietzsche was born in 1844 in Röcken (Saxony), Germany.  He studied classical philology at the universities of Bonn and Leipzig, and in 1869 was appointed to the chair of classical philology at the University of Basel, Switzerland. Ill health led him to resign his professorship ten years later.  His works include The Birth of Tragedy, Thus Spoken Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, On the Genealogy of Morals, The Case of Wagner, Twilight of the Idols, the Antichrist, Nietzsche contra Wagner, and Ecce Homo. He died in 1900.  The Will to Power, a selection from his notebooks, was published posthumously.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Birth of Tragedy and On the Genealogy of Morals 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
amandacb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Eccentric? Yes. Overrated? No way. I think the key to read Nietzsche is not to take him too seriously. He provides excellent conversation starters. My copy is full of underlines, highlights, margin notes, and exclamations.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing, it makes you feel as if you wrote it yourself, that is if you share the same opinions. Though at times it seems to ramble on,the point that he is trying to get across makes it feel necessary. As I said before, never before read Nietzche, but i will till i read everything by him.