The Story Girl

The Story Girl

by L. M. Montgomery

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Overview

Sara Stanley is only fourteen, but she can weave tales that are impossible to resist. In the charming town of Carlisle, children and grown-ups alike flock from miles around to hear her spellbinding tales. And when Bev King and his younger brother Felix arrive for the summer, they, too, are captivated by the Story Girl. Whether she's leading them on exciting misadventure or narrating timeless stories—from the scary "Tale of the Family Ghost" to the fanciful "How Kissing Was Discovered" to the bittersweet "The Blue Chest of Rachel Ward"—the Story Girl has her audience hanging on every word.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780735263291
Publisher: Tundra
Publication date: 01/09/2018
Sold by: Random House
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 320
File size: 5 MB
Age Range: 10 Years

About the Author





Lucy Maud Montgomery OBE (November 30, 1874 - April 24, 1942), publicly known as L. M. Montgomery, was a Canadian author best known for a series of novels beginning in 1908 with Anne of Green Gables. The book was an immediate success.




The central character, Anne Shirley, an orphaned girl, made Montgomery famous in her lifetime and gave her an international following.[1] The first novel was followed by a series of sequels with Anne as the central character.




Montgomery went on to publish 20 novels as well as 530 short stories, 500 poems, and 30 essays. Most of the novels were set in Prince Edward Island, and locations within Canada's smallest province became a literary landmark and popular tourist site-namely Green Gables farm, the genesis of Prince Edward Island National Park. She was made an officer of the Order of the British Empire in 1935.




Montgomery's work, diaries and letters have been read and studied by scholars and readers worldwide.




Shortly after her grandmother's death in 1911, she married Ewen (spelled in her notes and letters as "Ewan" Macdonald (1870-1943), a Presbyterian minister,[4] and they moved to Ontario where he had taken the position of minister of St. Paul's Presbyterian Church, Leaskdale in present-day Uxbridge Township, also affiliated with the congregation in nearby Zephyr. Montgomery wrote her next eleven books from the Leaskdale manse.




Montgomery was honoured by Britain's King George V as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE), as there were no Canadian orders, decorations or medals for civilians until the 1970s.




Montgomery was named a National Historic Person in 1943 by the Canadian federal government. Her Ontario residence was designated a National Historic Site (NHS) in 1997 (Leaskdale Manse NHS), while the place that inspired her famous novels, Green Gables, was designated "L. M. Montgomery's Cavendish NHS" in 2004.

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The Story Girl 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Loved rereading this delightful story as much as I did the first time I read it as a child. However much of the charm was lost due to the puntuational and grammer issues this copy of the story had. Still I would recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My aunt gave me this book.( not sure if its the same version) makes u feel like ur living the story! AWSOME!!!!!!
fersher on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was really a wonderful book. The story spans a Summer and Fall where a group of cousins and friends spend time together getting into all sorts of mischief and learning life lessons. The sequel to this book is "The Golden Road."
calexis on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I just realized that the published date happened to be Canada Day. So that's pretty cool for this Canadian book to be released that date. Anyways, I love Montgomery's narrations. I have ever since I read "Anne of Green Gables" for school back in grade 6 or 7. I ended up convincing my mom to buy me the entire Anne series, and have read the entire series at least 3 times up to this date. However, a few days a go, I decided that I should read Montgomery's other novels. And though The Story Girl hasn't spellbounded me like Anne of Green Gables, I still loved it. The novel is very different from the styles of the novels today. Like Anne of Green Gables, there isn't a real conflict to the story, it's a telling of a child's life and adventures. Nowadays, every plot seems to have to hold a antagonist or life-threatening problem to make it to the press. However, Montgomery's books are ordinary narrations about ordinary Canadians. And I think that's what I love about it. I can't wait to read more of her novels, especially her other series "Emily of New Moon."
chilirlw on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
L. M. Montgomery, author of the much-loved Anne of Green Gables books, called The Story Girl "my favorite among my books", possibly because she saw the title character as a kind of romanticized version of herself. As the rest of us must lack that pleasurable sense of self-flattery, however, I'm afraid the book falls flat. In it, the adventures of a group of eight Canadian children ages 11-14 (narrated by one of the boys looking back from adulthood), are interspersed with the stories told to them by the eldest of their number, the Story Girl herself. We are told (again and again) that the Story Girl, though not beautiful, is nonetheless the sort of charismatic personality that draws everyone to her. "If voices had colour, hers would have been like a rainbow. It made words live. Whatever she said became a breathing reality, not a mere verbal statement or utterance." There's rather a lot of this sort of thing, every time the Story Girl does something, which is of course often, since the book is named after her. The story is set in the late 1800's; the children are quite a bit (almost unbelievably) more unworldly than tweens and early teens of our own era, and I had to constantly revise my expectations of their knowledge and conduct downwards (quite a bit downwards, in fact). Which I think, even more than the tiresome hyperbole about the Story Girl's attractiveness, is what rings false in this book. It reads like a book written by the childless auntie who just adores the little darlings! and has no real concept of what real children are like. Throughout it refers to their feelings and exploits with a winking sort of smarminess that is just a few shades too twee to be borne. "And I, even in these late years of irreverence for the dreams of youth, am not in the least ashamed to confess that when I knelt down to say my boyish prayer, I thought of our little furry comrade in his extremity, and prayed as reverently as I knew how for his healing."This sort of "talking down" to children makes me cringe, and I can't but imagine how much more embarrassing it would be to a child who was reading it. Not a keeper.
TheLiteraryPhoenix More than 1 year ago
Generally speaking, this book is *okay*. It's not bad. It's not breathtaking. It's just a story about a group of children on a farm for the summer having conversations about their family and neighbors, and examining their religious beliefs with the mixture of piety and casual curiosity to common to children. It's nothing spectacular, but it's perfectly readable. The characters aren't as vibrant and interesting as Montgomery's other works, and the narrator is nowhere near as captivating as Anne Shirley. That said, for those who enjoy classics and casual stories about everyday life in the early 20th century, this book will be perfect! For myself, I'm glad I read it, but I don't think it's one I'd revisit.
InTheBookcase More than 1 year ago
The Story Girl is a beautifully-written classic. A perfect piece of literature that could be enjoyed by anyone, young or old. Beverley and Felix (two brothers) get to visit their father's childhood home on Prince Edward Island. They meet up with the rest of the 'clan' living there, including several cousins and friends their own age, that they get to while away the summer with. The passing days include playful fancies, raucous romps, and poetic tales (as narrated by their cousin Sara Stanley, the Story Girl).  No matter what the children are up to, the Story Girl always has an amusing incident to tell about, whether truth or fiction. As the chapters flew by, I found myself amazed at just how many stories the Story Girl conveniently had memorized. It must be nice to have such enchanting things to tell, especially at just the right moments to share with others.  One thing to note: The children do get quite curious about religious subjects, and sometimes, when several of their young minds all give individual opinions, end up having a muddled view on certain points of the Bible. For me, this just added an extra bit of laughter!  L.M. Montgomery has a lovely writing style, always knowing how to convey the whimsical parts of story just right to give an extra spark, and playing out all the other emotions so appealingly. There are many scenes in this book which I just love, whether it was the children's banters, schemes, or naive tragedies. I don't think I'll ever grow tired of reading of her books!
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Oh my gosh it is truly a awesome book :)
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Hey yall should stop using this as an personal chat room. These are meant to help people as they look for books to read. Thats why its called reviews.
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I have listened to it on audio recording and it was really good so now i think that i want to read this book. You should read it too because its really good
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