The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales

The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales

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Overview

The entire book, with its unconventional page arrangement and eclectic, frenetic mix of text and pictures, is a spoof on the art of book design and the art of the fairy tale. The individual tales, such as The Really Ugly Duckling and Little Red Running Shorts, can be extracted for telling aloud, with great success. Another masterpiece from the team that created The True Story of the Three Little Pigs!
-Horn Book

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780670844876
Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date: 10/28/1992
Pages: 64
Sales rank: 24,816
Product dimensions: 8.68(w) x 10.84(h) x 0.42(d)
Lexile: 520L (what's this?)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

Multiple award-winning author Jon Scieszka grew up in Flint, Michigan, the second oldest and the nicest of six boys. Jon went to school at Culver Military Academy in Indiana where he was a Lieutenant; Albion College in Michigan where he studied to be a doctor; and Columbia University in New York, where he received an M.F.A. in fiction. He taught elementary school in New York for ten years in a variety of positions. He is the author of many books for children including the New York Times Best Illustrated Book The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales (illustrated by Lane Smith), the Caldecott Honor book The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (illustrated by Lane Smith), and Math Curse (illustrated by Lane Smith).  In addition to his work as an author, Jon also runs a web-based literacy program called “Guys Read” that is designed to encourage boys, particularly reluctant readers, to get involved with books. In 2008, Jon was named the country’s first National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, a joint effort of the Library of Congress and the Children’s Book Council. During his two-year role as Ambassador, he acted as a spokesperson for children’s literature, speaking to groups of parents, teachers, and children to encourage the importance of reading. You can visit Jon online at www.jsworldwide.com.

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The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 99 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My 6 year old daughter loves this book. She laughs hysterically when she reads it.
Justkristen3 More than 1 year ago
Scieszka's outlandish characters and twisted plots will entertain children. The vocabulary is modern, and the writing is decent. I read the book when I was a child, and I still remembered it ten years later when I started a collection of children's books for my future children.
kotomi More than 1 year ago
This book is so much fun, not only is it a family favorite between my kids and I, but I have also given it out as gifts to adult friends. It's great for all ages, and no one walks away without giggling for the next few days. The entertainment begins on the inside cover page...and don't forget to read the table of contents. You won't be disappointed
booksaregreatNV More than 1 year ago
I'm 17 years old now and a senior in high school, but I can tell you that this is a book that I definetaly remember my elementary school teachers reading outloud to the class many time, because we all loved it. It has everything that we loved. This book is not one to pass up. I'll be buying a copy for my little sisters to enjoy as much is I use to when I was younger. I would also get the hardcover version, because it's bound to last longer than the paperback version. Hope you like it as much as I do. Brings back great memories! (: - Natalia
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales' is a great book! It rearanges and twists Classic Fairy Tales into funny, cute stories and let's the Fairy Tales go into whole new dirictions. If you thought Fairy Tales were boring, you've GOT to check this book out!
ReadAloudDenver on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You and your child will be laughing so hard when you read this book aloud. Completely and utterly irreverent humor as Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith mock the traditional fairy tales in this Caldecott Honored book. Favorites include "Cinderumplelstiltskin or The Girl Who Really Blew It", "The Other Frog Prince" where "the princess wiped the frog slime off her lips" and "The Really Ugly Duckling" who "grew up to be just a really ugly duck." You'll be having so much fun reading this book aloud to your children that your laughter and enthusiasm will be completely contagious.
jyasinchuk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure if it is the slapstick humour or explosive -in-your-face illustrations, and inconsistent and wildly erratic layout and font usage, but Scieszka's book is the first choice for any teacher starting a unit on fairytales. Stories like Little Red Running Shorts (the narrator screws up), the Really Ugly Duckling, Chicken Licken (the only thing falling is the table of contents) had me laughing out loud! The Stinky Cheese Man was smelly enough to be a Caldecott Honour Book in 1993.
sbigger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a collection of fractured fairytales. The characters should be familiar to just about anyone, expect maybe the Stinky Cheese man who is just another version of the Gingerbread man. It is the messed up plots and the crazy endings which make this book interesting. None of these fairytales end in the traditional ways or the characters are seen in a different light. In some cases the stories just seem to drop right off the page. The author uses the illustrations to help convey the sense of a fractured fairy tale. The art is mostly done with cutouts seemingly from newspapers and magazines. Text placement and size is used to help tell the story, like the giant sized words for Jack and the Beanstalk. Overall it is an interesting book for older elementary children. Any younger than 1st or 2nd grade, the humor might be lost on.
creeh on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
the stinky cheese man and other fairly stupid tales is one of my all time favorite childrens books! ive been reading this book since i was in elementary school. it is a collection of fairy tales told in stupid ways, and even some that are completely off base from the original. for example, the little red hen just pops out every once in while griping that its taking too long to tell her story. jack, form jack and the beanstalk, is the narrartor throughout the book, he is shown to be the producer of the whole mess, and lets the reader in as if the reader is his partner in crime. it is a very funny book, and often, i like these versions of the stories better anyway. this book could definately be used in alot of ways because its really so open, a teacher could use it to open up a fairy tale lesson, or even just bounce through the book and tell the stories that would apply to the situation. also, this book would be a good example how good books can be written very silly.
AmyElizabeth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Absolutely hilarious. I remember my dad and I reading this book repeatedly. We both loved it. New fairy tales, and new takes on old fairy tales, this book is hilarious. The illustrations are unique and really bring out the quirkiness of this book. It's quite obvious why it won the Caldecott: you can't not like it!
sweetiegherkin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is full of humorous versions of well-known fairy tales. For instance, instead of ¿Little Red Riding Hood,¿ we have ¿Little Red Running Shorts,¿ in which the titular character outruns the wolf to her grandmother¿s house, thus defeating his evil plans. The stories are all funny in a quirky sort of way and probably could be enjoyed even if the reader doesn¿t know much about the fairy tales being satirized. The illustrations were nominated for an award and are interesting to look at and colorful, although not personally appealing to me.
mvanemmerik on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
FantasyArt: illustrations rendered in oil and vinegar
camarie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Hilarious and lovable, there is never a dull moment in this book, and you will not regret reading it.
alliek710 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A very funny 'fairy tale' book that throws it's own twist on old tales. Definitely not your ordinary children's book, but any kid would crack up laughing so hard reading it.
Katya0133 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A funny and irreverent take on classic fairy tales.
sagrundman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a collection of fractured fairytales. The characters should be familiar to just about anyone, expect maybe the Stinky Cheese man who is just another version of the Gingerbread man. It is the messed up plots and the crazy endings which make this book interesting. None of these fairytales end in the traditional ways or the characters are seen in a different light. In some cases the stories just seem to drop right off the page. The author uses the illustrations to help convey the sense of a fractured fairy tale. The art is mostly done with cutouts seemingly from newspapers and magazines. Text placement and size is used to help tell the story, like the giant sized words for Jack and the Beanstalk. Overall it is an interesting book for older elementary children. Any younger than 1st or 2nd grade, the humor might be lost on.
mmsharp on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Fairytales retold. This is a great creative book retelling all the stories you could remember as a child. The stories are silly and tend to even make fun of the ones you know. The Ugly Duckling who actually grows up to become and ugly duck. A silly book full of fun retold rhymes. Another Caldecott winner!
jhill06 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Critique: This is a good example of a fairy tale becuase the stories contain some form of magic, like in Jack's Bean Problem. Some of the stories have a moral or lesson to them but with a twist, and all generally have a protagonist who is good and usually wins, such as the prince in The Princess and the Bowling Ball.Genre: Fairy Tales
anita.west on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a real classic; it is filled with what the author calls ¿Almost Fairy Tales,¿ or ¿Fairly Stupid Tales.¿ This is not a traditional book, rather, it is a mixed up story, font, backwards, out of order book. The narrator plays the main character and is very funny (but somewhat warped) as he tells his version of modernized fairy tales throughout the book.I think this book is great. I enjoyed the re-mix version of the classic fairytales I read as a child. The Stinky Cheese Man, which is a re-make of the Gingerbread Man, was hilarious and perhaps my favorite ¿Fairly Stupid Tale.¿I would definitely use this book in the classroom with children in grades 4 and above. This book would serve as a good example for creating stories using previously written one¿s as guideposts. I would ask the students to choose their favorite fairy tale and recreate it just as Scieszka and Smith did in this book. I am sure this would be a welcomed activity. Another classroom extension idea would be to read the stories to the students (without naming the titles) and ask them to name the original fairy tale that the author was recreating. This would be a fun literature-matching activity for the students; it would also give the teacher an idea as to how many children know or are familiar with classic fairy tales.
heather_hill on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This collection of stories is a spin-off of several classic fairytales. Those fairytales include The Stinky Cheese Man, a "smelly" rendition of The Gingerbread Man, Chicken Licken, a "smashing" tale about Chicken Little, and The Princess and the Bowling Ball, a very "lumpy" representation of The Princess and the Pea. With Jack (from Jack and the Beanstalk) as the narrator, trying desperately not to awaken the sleeping giant, thses stories become quite interesting!I love authors with a sense of humor, and this book is hilarious! This assortment of tales is a perfect combination of funny and downright twisted. I enjoyed these because they aren't what is to be expected, and it's nice to have that every once in a while.One extension I'd do with my students is to have them fabricate their own renditions of fairytales they remember being read to them. They can illustrate their stories, and we could create our own "fairly stupid tales" book for the classroom library. A second extension could be to break my students up into groups and have them perform one of their renditions to the classroom. We could videotape and play them for their parents at open house!
RosesAreRed on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I checked this book out from my elementary school library at least 10 times.
bplma on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A clever and humorous send up of some well known European folk and fairy tales: Little Red Hen, Chicken Little, Princess and the Pea, Ugly Duckling, Frog Prince, Red Riding Hood, Jack and the Bean Stalk, Cinderella, Rumplestiltskin, Tortoise and the Hare and the Gingerbread Man. Scieszka parodies not only the tales but also the Books themselves. Not for the youngest readers as parodies only work when one is familiar with the original tale, and because readers need a certain level of sophistication to "get it", but for some 2nd and definitely 3rd and up this is a terrific treat--whether you are doing a unit on tales or writing your own stories--this is a winner. I especially loved Little Red Hen's running commentary.
ysar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It's just my opinion, but I'm fairly certain this is the best book written...ever.
t1bclasslibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a collection of bits of parodies of well-known fairy tales- they are well written and put a lot of humor into drier stories. This collection featers rewrites of "The Little Red Hen," "Chicken Little," "The Gingerbread Man," "The Princess and the Pea," "The Ugly Duckling," "The Frog Prince," "Little Red Riding Hood," "Jack and the Beanstalk," "The Tortoise and the Hare," "Cinderella," and "Rumplestiltskin." They are thrown around, recombined, etc. This would be a great book for a lesson on comparing/ rewriting fairy tales. It also plays with and takes apart story conventions, and might be a good lesson for that.
Calamia on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is great humours book that makes fun of classic fairlytales. This is a book for all ages even adults. This book gives a twist to every fairly tale and makes them more intersting and fun to read.