The Sherwood Ring

The Sherwood Ring

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Overview

Newly orphaned Peggy Grahame is caught off-guard when she first arrives at her family’s ancestral estate. Her eccentric uncle Enos drives away her only new acquaintance, Pat, a handsome British scholar, then leaves Peggy to fend for herself. But she is not alone. The house is full of mysteries—and ghosts. Soon Peggy becomes involved with the spirits of her own Colonial ancestors and witnesses the unfolding of a centuries-old romance against a backdrop of spies and intrigue and of battles plotted and foiled. History has never been so exciting—especially because the ghosts are leading Peggy to a romance of her own!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780618150748
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 10/29/2001
Pages: 272
Sales rank: 299,793
Product dimensions: 5.12(w) x 7.62(h) x 0.68(d)
Age Range: 10 - 14 Years

About the Author

Elizabeth Marie Pope was an American, Newbury Honor-winning author and educator specializing in Elizabethan England.

Customer Reviews

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Sherwood Ring 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 21 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dear me! What a lovely book. There's the half-lazy, brilliant strategist which reminds one of the Scarlet Pimpernel. A truly wonderful novel of the American Revolution - with romance between the fighting sides. The humour, slightly dry at times when voiced by the characters, is quite to my taste. Though there are two stories going on at once - one in the present, one in the past - I've never found myself confused between the two - even when there are some striking similarities between them.... This is a must read.
thepequodtwo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Compared to Pope's other book, The Perilous Gard, which is one of my absolute favorites, The Sherwood Ring isn't quite as gripping and compelling - it may be due to my own idiosyncrasies (I find Elizabethan England more interesting than Revolutionary America, and the fairy tale of Tam Lin more exciting than ghosts), but at the very least these are two very different books. The tone of the Sherwood Ring is necessarily different - it's told in the first person by Peggy Grahame, a contemporary girl who moves to her Uncle Enos's historical estate, Rest-and-be-thankful, in upstate New York upon the death of her father. Her uncle is a history fanatic and has preserved the estate so precisely and faithfully it's like stepping back in time - there aren't even any telephones. Pope constructs a series of interweaving narratives as Peggy is visited by ghosts who tell her their stories - personal histories that are tied up with the history of the estate, the course of American History, and the present day events at Rest-and-be-thankful, including Peggy's own life and loves. The pacing is rather sedate, at least in Peggy's story - her role is mostly that of listener, and she's consistently passive (my only complaint). But the individual ghosts are colorful characters who transport you back in time to the American Revolution. One of Pope's greatest achievements here is to paint a full picture of the time period - the rebels aren't lionized, the British aren't demonized, so that the reader can enjoy interacting with real people instead of propaganda or symbols, individuals caught up in the sweep of history and larger than life events amongst which they must struggle in their bids for survival and happiness. There's a lot of exposition in the contemporary portion of the story, which can get a bit clunky, but the ghosts make up for it with more than enough action and adventure. Not as dear to my heart as The Perilous Gard, but still a great read.
phoebesmum on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Vaguely reminiscent of Barbara Michaels, this is a quite charming little ghost story ¿ lacking the tragedy that usually haunts (ha!) the genre. The modern-day story is the weakest part of the book; one finds oneself wishing the ghosts made more appearances, as their history is by far more interesting.
The_Hibernator on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Sherwood Ring was a fetching young adult fantasy/romance about a recently orphaned teen, Peggy, who goes to live with her uncle on the family¿s ancestral estate. Her uncle, who is immersed in his obsession about Revolution-era history, ignores the young woman entirely; so she does some historical explorations of her own. She is aided by the ghosts of her ancestors who haunt the old mansion. With their help, she learns that history repeats itself and that she, too, can find happiness. The book is sweet, engaging, and well-written.
MerryMary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A lovely story. A modern day woman goes to the "ancestral home" in upstate New York, to live with her Uncle. There are reportedly ghosts, and there is definitely a secret somewhere that causes Uncle Enos to act very strangely indeed. Peggy and her new friend Pat try to figure out what these dire secrets are. She is helped immeasurably by a series of ghosts that appear from time to time to tell her their stories of guerrilla warfare during the Revolution. The story was short, fun, and tangled just enough to keep me turning the pages. I loved it, especially at the end when a number of threads come together most satisfactorily.
cabri on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A nice little ghost story that years ago wouldn't even have been called a fantasy, The Sherwood Ring brings together two young lovers using ghosts from Revolutionary New York to overcome their obstacles, the main obstacle being an uncle that may have done something horribly wrong. All the men are handsome and daring, the women pretty and rebellious, but the historical events are interesting and the result an amusing and sweet romance perfect for older intermediate readers.
Hamburgerclan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This one was a fun read. It's the tale of Peggy Grahame, a young woman who moves in with her Uncle Enos on her family's estate in New York after her father dies. Enos is a crotchety old bird and pretty much ignores her. Some other relatives, namely some dead ones, don't however. Through such spectral encounters, Peggy learns the tale of the Sherwood Ring, a group of Loyalist guerrillas who fought against the Colonial army during the Revolutionary War. Like I said, 'twas a fun read. The characters were engaging and Ms. Pope told the tale in such a way that each "ghost story" left you wanting more. I'm glad I checked it out.--J.
melannen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An excellent novel, with some fascinating looks at side corners of history and historiography, puzzles and suprises around every corner, and well-drawn characters, including some of the most *romantic* romantic leads I've ever met in a YA novel. Well-drawn applies to this edition's illustrations (by Evelyn Ness) as well, stylized but fascinating.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I loooooved this book! The quality of the writing, and the storyline were fantastic! I would highly recommend this book!
The_hibernators More than 1 year ago
The Sherwood Ring was a fetching young adult fantasy/romance about a recently orphaned teen, Peggy, who goes to live with her uncle on the family's ancestral estate. Her uncle, who is immersed in his obsession about Revolution-era history, ignores the young woman entirely; so she does some historical explorations of her own. She is aided by the ghosts of her ancestors who haunt the old mansion. With their help, she learns that history repeats itself and that she, too, can find happiness. The book is sweet, engaging, and well-written.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
lilmudduckmuffineater More than 1 year ago
I really liked this book. I have been telling myself I need to break out of my bubble on what I read and try new types of books. I'm glad I did and read this book because it's defiantly different than what I usually read. Peggy's father dies and she is sent to live with his brother(Uncle Enos) in a house that has been passed down in her family since before the Revolutionary War. She soon meets the ghosts of some of her ancestors and learns all about the past and what happened in her family and their house during the Revolutionary War and how they found their true loves. Peggy eventually learns her uncle's secret and finds her own true love. This book came out in 1958(I will admit I never read books that were written before 1980) but it is a good book for that time. I will check into reading other books(I defiantly need to read the classics from even before that time) like it!
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Some of the stories in this book are boring, but one in particular I found captivating. This was a well-written novel, and I would re-read it sometime.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sherwood Ring is a great book, I read it in the fifth grade for a book report, I didn't really think that I would like it so much. Now years later I have finally found the book and I haven't put it down. It's like reading it for the first time.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This has been my favourite book since I picked it up rather accidentally in seventh grade. The humour, wit, and imagery is amazing and dazzling. I have never seen a ghost story written so wonderfully. It is captivating, as are the characters--though most are long since dead.