Sector 7

Sector 7

by David Wiesner

Hardcover

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Overview

Only the person who gave us Tuesday could have devised this fantastic Caldecott Honor-winning tale, which begins with a school trip to the Empire State Building. There a boy makes friends with a mischievous little cloud, who whisks him away to the Cloud Dispatch Center for Sector 7 (the region that includes New York City). The clouds are bored with their everyday shapes, so the boy obligingly starts to sketch some new ones. . . . The wordless yet eloquent account of this unparalleled adventure is a funny, touching story about art, friendship, and the weather, as well as a visual tour de force.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780395746561
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date: 09/20/1999
Pages: 48
Sales rank: 233,030
Product dimensions: 9.25(w) x 10.75(h) x 0.41(d)
Age Range: 4 - 7 Years

About the Author


David Wiesner is internationally renowned for his visual storytelling and has won the Caldecott Medal three times—for Tuesday, The Three Pigs, and Flotsam—the second person in history to do so. He is also the recipient of three Caldecott Honors, for Free Fall, Sector 7, and Mr. Wuffles. He lives near Philadelphia with his family. www.hmhbooks.com/wiesner 

Hometown:

Outside Philadelphia, P.A.

Date of Birth:

February 5, 1956

Place of Birth:

Bridgewater, NJ

Education:

Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Although Wiesner's latest picture-book fantasy appears at first to be wordless, it actually has some words that are quite important. On a class trip to the Empire State Building, a boy who likes to draw is approached by a friendly cloud who takes him to Sector 7, a "terminal" reminiscent of a train station in the sky, where clouds form according to blueprints drawn up by grumpy, unimaginative humans. It seems the clouds are itching for a makeover, and the boy, pencil and paper in hand, gives it to them. Because words such as terminal, arrivals, and assignment station, which appear on signs in the pictures, are necessary to establish the scene in some instances, younger children may need adult help with the book. But the clever sometimes overlapping illustrations are wonderful: strong and precise, they range from detailed, realistic renderings of places and human characters to pictures of fluffy clouds, at once diaphanous and substantial, complete with expressive faces, and fat, fascinating four-fingered hands. A book for somewhat older children than the ones who "read" books by John Goodall and his ilk, but a good choice for getting the imagination to work." Booklist, ALA

"Finding shapes in the clouds is a grand pastime on a lazy day. But what makes those shapes anyway? and what if you had the power to alter them, to create new forms and details when amorphous arrangements are the norm? In a fittingly wordless book, this is exactly what happens to one young boy on a field trip to the top of the Empire State Building-where anything can happen, if movies are to be believed. This time, as the building is veiled in mist, a friendly cloud appears to the boy and after a few playful moments takes him on a tour of Sector 7, a factory-like satellite where clouds are shaped, classified, and distributed. The structure is like a Victorian railroad station with signs noting arrival and departure times, but tubes shaped like large funnels, not tracks, disperse the clouds to their assigned locations. The organization is hierarchical, regimented, and traditional. Perhaps that is why the playful cloud interjects a new element-a boy with imagination who can draw. And draw he does, fantastic shapes of sea life that confound the regular staff members who do not appreciate his artistry. Expelled for insubordina-tion, he is sent via cloud-carrier back to the Empire State Building just in time to rejoin his schoolmates for the return trip. But there is a different aura about him, and the clouds he inspired are amazing onlookers-much to the consternation of Sector 7! As with all wordless books, individual readers will supply the "text"; consequently, interpretations of exactly what's going on may differ depending upon age, sophistication, and experience. The illustrations, ranging from full-page spreads to small vignettes, are startlingly and powerfully conceived, the fanciful cloud-shapes both funny and elegant. Reminiscent of both William Pene du Bois's Lion and Pat Cummings's C.L.O.U.D.S., the book nevertheless ascends to new heights. In fact, it definitely inspires a bit of sky-watching." Horn Book

"From levitating frogs to giant vegetables that take wing, Wiesner resuscitates his fondness for flying in another stretch of his imagination. In a wordless story told through picture panels and murals, a young boy is overtaken by fog on a class field trip to the top of the Empire State Building. He befriends a snowmanlike cloud who dons the boy's red cap and scarf and wings him to an ominous factory in the sky. Dubbed Sector 7, this imposing, industrial hunk of machinery is a Grand Central Station for clouds, from which they're all dispatched. The boy learns that clouds can freely take on various shapes, and soon has them twisting and stretching themselves into fish, to the dismay of the grim, uniformed workers. In a showy display, the clouds invade Manhattan, surprising cats at windows and children below. Wiesner's fans will rediscover all his favorite motifsdreams overlapping reality, metamorphosing creatures, and morerendered in precise watercolors with tilted perspectives." Kirkus Reviews

"Finding shapes in the clouds is a grand pastime on a lazy day. But what makes those shapes anyway? and what if you had the power to alter them, to create new forms and details when amorphous arrangements are the norm? In a fittingly wordless book, this is exactly what happens to one young boy on a field trip to the top of the Empire State Building-where anything can happen, if movies are to be believed. This time, as the building is veiled in mist, a friendly cloud appears to the boy and after a few playful moments takes him on a tour of Sector 7, a factory-like satellite where clouds are shaped, classified, and distributed. The structure is like a Victorian railroad station with signs noting arrival and departure times, but tubes shaped like large funnels, not tracks, disperse the clouds to their assigned locattions. The organization is hhhhhhierarchical, regimented, and traditional. Perhaps that is why the playful cloud interjects a new element-a boy with imagination who can draw. And draw he does, fantastic shapes of sea life that confound the regular staff members who do not appreciate his artistry. Expelled for insubordination, he is sent via cloud-carrier back to the Empire State Building just in time to rejoin his schoolmates for the return trip. But there is a different aura about him, and the clouds he inspired are amazing onlookers-much to the consternation of Sector 7! As with all wordless books, individual readers will supply the "text"; consequently, interpretations of exactly what's going on may differ depending upon age, sophistication, and experience. The illustrations, ranging from full-page spreads to small vignettes, are startlingly and powerfully conceived, the fanciful cloud-shapes both funny and elegant. Reminiscent of both William Pene du Bois's Lion and Pat Cummings's C.L.O.U.D.S., the book nevertheless ascends to new heights. In fact, it definitely inspires a bit of sky-watching." Horn Book, Starred

"Wiesner's fans will be on Cloud 9 with this wordless scenario of a class trip to the Empire State Building. . . . The framed panels have a cinematic quality that sweeps readers off into the clouds along with the boy. This wittily depicted stretch of the imagination displays Wiesner's talent in top form." School Library Journal, Starred

"Caldecott Medalist Wiesner (TUESDAY) again takes to the air, with watercolors that render words superfluous." Publishers Weekly, Starred

Customer Reviews

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Sector 7 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
claudiathelibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
4-5Q- The illustrations are interesting and provide the necessary detail for the story. Reminds me of the Invention of Hugo Cabret.4P- Kids will enjoy the images and interesting story they tell.
abruser on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
"Sector 7" is about a young child that goes on a feild trip to the empire state building and gets abducted by a cloud. The cloud takes the child to a place called Sector 7 which is a cloud making factory. The child draws up plans for bizarre clouds that look like fish. When the child leaves the museum the sky is filled with fish that the child had imagined. The illustrations are detailed and thourough enough to tell the whole story.
Smiler69 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another wordless wonder and a Caldecott Honour book, this graphic novel tells the fantastical story of a boy with artistic talents who goes on a school outing to the Empire State Building. Once in the observatory, the children are disappointed to find the sky is too cloudy to see the views, but the boy is approached by a friendly cloud who whisks him away to "Sector 7", a cloud manufacturing plant somewhere in the skies. Once there, the boy causes a small revolution when he starts drawing creative shapes featuring gorgeous sea creatures for the outgoing clouds. I loved the concept and realization of this book, but just couldn't buy the idea of those friendly clouds with the smiling faces for some reason. Still, a book most definitely worth checking out for the sheer creativity and beautiful (and intricate!) watercolours by Wiesner.
mrcmyoung on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another wild ride from David Wiesner, a boy makes friends with a mischievous cloud while on a field trip to the Empire State Building. When his new friend takes him to the cloud factory in the sky, Sector 7, the pair throw a monkey wrench into the operations that has everybody in the city looking up. How wonderful it would be to pair this book with a science lesson on clouds, or to show a group of students just for fun.
Stephanyk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a Caldecott Honor Book and is appropriate for the grades pre-k through the first grade. The book has no words and many pictures with tons of descriptions that would interest younger children. There are one or two words in the pictures that the teacher can read to the students. The book starts off with a class going to the Empire State Building. A boy loses his hat, scarf and gloves and finds that a cloud has stolen it. They become friends and the boy ends up following the cloud to a factory that tells the cloud how big they should be and where they should go. The boy takes all of the clouds blue prints and changes them. Instead of their regular shape he turns them into animals of the sea. Some of the workers of the factories get angry and the boy is sent back home. At the end though when the boy looks up at the sky he sees clouds shaped like a fish and an octopus. Uses in the classroom: - I would have materials (cotton balls, crayons, shapes made out of construction paper) set up for the children and have them create their own kinds of clouds.- After I would have children share what they drew and why.- I would hang all the cloud drawings on the ceiling all around the classroom.
ReadAloudDenver on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An incredible nearly wordless book that celebrates originality and creativity. Children will learn narrative skills or telling stories in their own words as you read this book aloud together. Adults and children will fall in love with this book and the clouds' unstoppable drive to express their individuality.
crochetbunnii on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Personal Response:I enjoyed Wiesner's approach to cloud shapes. The fanciful approach to the dismal fog and the introduction to how clouds become what they are is fun and beautiful. Children of all ages are sure to enjoy this wordless picture book about the formation of clouds.Curricular Connections:Children can learn about how clouds are formed, the types of clouds (listed in Sector 7's Arrivals/Departures) and draw their own cloud-shaped objects. In good weather, children can also be taken outside to observe clouds and make up stories about the images they see.
francescadefreitas on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another splendid book without words from David Wiesner - this time the story of a by on a school tour who ends up befriending a cloud. And when boy with imagination and a pencil meets clouds bored of being fluffy, the sky will never be the same again.
lauraejensen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the wordless telling of a boy's adventure while on a school field trip to the Empire State Building. The young boy befriends a cloud, who takes the boy to Sector 7, where we witness boring cloud shape makers. The boy sketches some inspiring sketches, but gets kicked out. This is a dreamy, fluid story that knits together art, friendship, weather, along with eloquence and humor. Great to use in class for weather discussions, free drawing of clouds, story telling, make believe.
baachan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An absolutely wonderful book about a boy on a field trip to the Empire State building. Separated from his class, he befriends a cloud. The cloud takes him up to Sector 7, the distribution center for clouds--the place where they get their marching orders, if you will. The boy starts to doodle some bizarre shapes on the "assignment sheets" that tell the clouds what they should look like. As a result, some pretty wacky clouds end up descending on New York City. Well, the supervisors--they're humans--get wind of what's happening and send him back to the Empire State building. But the cloud and boy form a lasting friendship. Oh, happy endings! The illustrations are wonderful, the narrative non-existent. The reader can make his or her own variations on the storyline, which is refreshing for someone like me who reads a lot of text. I find that with picture books with text, I end spending more time on the text than on the pictures, which is not at all the point of a picture book. Text can distract from the art, which is something that Wiesner avoids by eliminating text. And really, he doesn't need it to complete his story. Excellent book, recommended for purchase for all collections.
medebrielle on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Sector 7 by David Wiesner is another good book on weather. The story is about a little boy who is on a field trip to the Empire State Building in New York City. While on the field trip, they go on top of the building where the boy meets up with a cloud. He befriends the cloud and hopes on the clouds back. The cloud takes him to ¿Sector 7¿. This is where the clouds get their shapes. Unfortunately all the clouds are frumpy and boring looking. They want something new and exciting. The boy starts drawing fish and the clouds are very excited. The boy gets kicked out of sector 7, but arrives back with his class trip just in time to see the fish cloud show.
eevers on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I can just imagine my students adding the words to this cartoon strip-like book. Wiesner adds such expression to the characters faces (human AND cloud) that the imagined dialogue is just spilling out your mouth!
jebrou on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In Sector 7, David Wiesner creates a story with only pictures about a boy that starts out ordinary, then becomes something extraordinary. The boy in this book is taking a school field trip to the Empire State Building, a very tall building in New York City. While on the observation deck, the boy meets a friendly cloud who takes him on a magical ride to Sector 7, a type of train station for clouds. Here, the clouds are told where to go and what to look like. The boy, however, disrupts the organized, and somewhat bland, rules of the human administrators and teaches the clouds to form their own shapes that changes the sky into an underwater exhibit of exotic sea creatures.
ChristineRobinson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A wordless picture book with some of the most exquisite illustrations I have seen. The pictures take you through a boy¿s field trip where he meets a friendly cloud. An adventure ensues in which the boy ends up providing new and improved designs for cloud shapes. The depth of the story present in the pictures amazes and the unusual fantasy story is inspirational. Yet another wordless picture book that my daughters pored over.
rbtanger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Another excellent example of David Weisner's story-through-pictures method. Weisner, multi-time winner of the Caldecott Medal including his 2007 "Flotsam", catches children's imaginations with his beautiful and ultra-realistic illustrations.Sector 7 starts When a young boy takes a school trip to the Empire State Building. He is in for the adventure of his life when he makes a very curious friend: a cloud. The excitment begins when the new friends visit "Sector 7", the cloud deployment facility for the Eastern US.Playing out completely without text, the story is simple and easy to follow but highly imaginative and magical. Children as young as two and as old as teens will be enchanted by the illustrations and intriguing story line.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is wonderful for cultivating a child's imagination. Interesting illustrations. A great way to open up dialogue between parent and child.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
Weisner is always imaginative and almost surreal. He takes us to places we've only been as children and in Sector 7 he stays true to this creed. As picture book collector, this is a great addition, and all the kids I show it to love it.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is supposed to be a book for older kids, but my 18-month-old loves it! Because it doesn't have words, the reader can make up his own 'story' to go with the beautiful pictures. A great book!