Searching For Memory: The Brain, The Mind, And The Past

Searching For Memory: The Brain, The Mind, And The Past

by Daniel L. Schacter

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Overview

Memory. There may be nothing more important to human beings than our ability to enshrine experience and recall it. While philosophers and poets have elevated memory to an almost mystical level, psychologists have struggled to demystify it. Now, according to Daniel Schacter, one of the most distinguished memory researchers, the mysteries of memory are finally yielding to dramatic, even revolutionary, scientific breakthroughs. Schacter explains how and why it may change our understanding of everything from false memory to Alzheimer's disease, from recovered memory to amnesia with fascinating firsthand accounts of patients with striking—and sometimes bizarre—amnesias resulting from brain injury or psychological trauma.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780465075522
Publisher: Basic Books
Publication date: 05/02/1997
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 609,165
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 8.00(h) x 1.00(d)
Lexile: 1450L (what's this?)

About the Author

Daniel L. Schacter is professor and chair of psychology at Harvard University. He is the author of Stranger Behind the Engram: Theories of Memory and the Psychology of Science (1982) and has received the Troland Research Award from the National academy of Sciences. He lives in Newton, Massachusetts with his wife and two daughters.

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Searching for Memory: The Brain, the Mind, and the Past 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
neurodrew on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I started this book some time ago, soon after it came out, probably, in 1996. That was during the height of the recovered memory movement, and this volume is partly a response to that hysteria from a professional psychologist with an interest in memory. The author reviews current theories on memory from both a clinical and a experimental psychology viewpoint. He has several interesting stories to tell, about examples of limited memory loss for certain classes of words, or pictures, and the limited evidence for complete repression of memory. The issue of the difficulty that people have with citing the source for a memory is particularly interesting - Ellen is always asking me how I know something and I cannot tell her. It may cause problems with attribution of credit in scholarly works, however.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Guest More than 1 year ago
I started this book some time ago, soon after it came out, probably, in 1996. That was during the height of the recovered memory movement, and this volume is partly a response to that hysteria from a professional psychologist with an interest in memory. The author reviews current theories on memory from both a clinical and a experimental psychology viewpoint. He has several interesting stories to tell, about examples of limited memory loss for certain classes of words, or pictures, and the limited evidence for complete repression of memory. The issue of the difficulty that people have with citing the source for a memory is particularly interesting. I am always being asked how I know something and I cannot say. This tendancy to forget attribution may in particular cause problems with attribution of credit in scholarly works, however.