Rudin

Rudin

by Ivan Turgenev

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Overview

RUDIN (1856) by Ivan Sergeevich Turgenev (1818-1883) tells the story of a character typical to Turgenev -- a "superfluous" man, weak of will, brimming with indecisive frustration -- and yet tormented by ideals. Rudin is made impotent by the dissonance of honoring the older generations while at the same time embracing the new bold epoch of pre-revolutionary Russia.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9783732637331
Publisher: Outlook Verlag
Publication date: 04/07/2018
Pages: 136
Product dimensions: 5.83(w) x 8.27(h) x 0.32(d)

About the Author

Ivan Sergeyevich Turgenev (1818 - 1883) was a Russian novelist, short story writer, poet, playwright, translator and popularizer of Russian literature in the West. His first major publication, a short story collection entitled A Sportsman's Sketches (1852), was a milestone of Russian realism and his novel Fathers and Sons (1862) is regarded as one of the major works of 19th-century fiction. Turgenev's artistic purity made him a favorite of like-minded novelists of the next generation, such as Henry James and Joseph Conrad, both of whom greatly preferred Turgenev to Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky. James, who wrote no fewer than five critical essays on Turgenev's work, claimed that "his merit of form is of the first order" (1873) and praised his "exquisite delicacy", which "makes too many of his rivals appear to hold us, in comparison, by violent means and introduce us, in comparison, to vulgar things" (1896). Vladimir Nabokov, notorious for his casual dismissal of many great writers, praised Turgenev's "plastic musical flowing prose", but criticized his "labored epilogues" and "banal handling of plots". Nabokov stated that Turgenev "is not a great writer, though a pleasant one" and ranked him fourth among nineteenth-century Russian prose writers, behind Tolstoy, Gogol and Anton Chekhov, but ahead of Dostoyevsky. His idealistic ideas about love, specifically the devotion a wife should show her husband, were cynically referred to by characters in Chekhov's "An Anonymous Story".

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Rudin; 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Like all Turgenev's novels, Rudin is very enjoyable reading. There seems to be a sad, gloomy strain running through the book. While not as great as Fathers and Sons or Virgin Soil, Rudin is a work well worth buying and savoring. All of the characters are distinctive and interesting. Rudin turns out to be a complex, yet sympathetic individual. The love story is poignant.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago