A Rope and a Prayer: The Story of a Kidnapping

A Rope and a Prayer: The Story of a Kidnapping

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Overview

The compelling and insightful account of a New York Times reporter's abduction by the Taliban, and his wife's struggle to free him.

In November 2008, David Rohde, a Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent for The New York Times, was kidnapped by the Taliban and held captive for seven months in the tribal areas of Pakistan. In the process, Rohde became the first American to witness how Pakistan's powerful military turns a blind eye toward a Taliban ministate thriving inside its borders. In New York, David's wife Kristen Mulvihill, together with his family, kept the kidnapping secret for David's safety and struggled to navigate a labyrinth of conflicting agendas, misinformation, and lies. Part memoir, part work of journalism, A Rope and a Prayer is a story of duplicity, faith, resilience, and love.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780143120056
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 11/01/2011
Pages: 384
Sales rank: 778,203
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.86(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

David Rohde, winner of two Pulitzer Prizes in journalism, is a reporter for The New York Times and the author of Endgame: The Betrayal and Fall of Srebrenica.
Kristen Mulvihill has been a photography editor and director at various women's magazines, including Marie Claire and Self. Most recently, she was the photography director of Cosmopolitan. They live in New York City.

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Rope and a Prayer: A Kidnapping from Two Sides 2.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 53 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
True story of kidnapping shows in detail and the psyche behind it as well the spirit and love. Must read!
cabPA More than 1 year ago
I learned many things about Afghanistan and the eastern culture. I believe we need to know about other people in other cultures and how they react to situations and think about our culture---right or wrong--they have an opinion about us.
Bob201 More than 1 year ago
I thought this book read like an adventure novel.....but it is a true, frightening, amazing story! Learn what it was like to be kidnapped by the Taliban!! I got emotional at the end. I think this is a must-read book! Early in the book there was a bit too much history for me, so I skimmed several pages. But the actual real-life happenings were riveting!
bakersfieldbarbara on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I gave this book a 5 star rating because it deserves it, but I stumbled over some of David's Rohde's description of his plight in captivity out of anxiety of my own, not anything to do with his writing or reporting. His wife, Kristen, tells her side of the story as he tells his, and it is interesting and very informative to see this type of writing. A first for me to read such a plot and I enjoyed it from a male/female perspective. This report of a kidnapping similar to every day events in the news, gave me an inside to such events that I didn't know I needed more information about. I will look at the news in a different light now when kidnappings occur, but also try to understand our being in Afghanistan and what purpose is being served by the United States involvement. Having a grandson deployed in Afghanistan at this very moment didn't help my anxiety, and I was able to relate to Ms. Mulvihill's concerns for her husband. I look at war differently after reading this book. But I also will always question just how deep into enemy lines does a journalist have to go to get 'the rest of the story'. Mr. Rohde's apology all through the book to his parents, her parents, his new wife and all others involved in his release made me say a silent prayer that any who attempt these types of stories need to evaluate all of the dynamics, not for just them, but for those who may have to spend, hours, days, months, money and heartache for bad decisions by others. This is a must read for everyone who watches the news, and then walks away with no thought to the people involved. Even an insight as to how our government can and does help, but at times cannot, is worth the read.
caroren on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
For a harrowing seven months of captivity, Rohde, a Pulitzer Prize¿winning New York Times foreign correspondent on assignment in war-torn Afghanistan, survived after being kidnapped, with two Afghan colleagues, by the Taliban in November 2008, suffering from all of the cruel terrorist maneuvering and hapless government countermoves during the crisis. Rohde wrote a series of articles for the Times about his experiences, but here Rohde alternates chapters with Mulvihill, to whom he had been married for two months at the time of his kidnapping. In suspenseful prose, he recounts his abduction and she describes her efforts, along with those of the Times, to secure his release by writing everyone in government and negotiating with the Taliban. Rohde's escape, with one of his colleagues, received major media coverage. Possibly the most informative segments of the book are the masterly observations of life with the jihadists, the chaotic Pakistani tribal areas and the topsy-turvy war itself. This potent story of love and conflict ends well, but not without making some smart and edgy commentary on terrorism, hostage negotiation, political agendas, and the human heart.
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michaelRA More than 1 year ago
This book is about struggle No doubt. The two sided versions of the intrepid reporter in the hands of ignorant monsters and the struggle of his new wife trying to cope with the harrowing thought that a video of her husbands beheading could show up at any moment while being in the middle of all that New York has to offer is really revealing.This book without question dipics what its like dealing with those people in the middle east who absolutely despise us Americans. The brainwashing, the ignorance that exists and the hopelessness begs the question of "do we really have to have a presence in that part of the world". David and Kristin give a first hand account of what life is like living where ignorance,poverty,and religious zealots abound. Its history,its struggle,but its a great window to what we face from those who wiil harm us if given the chance.
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