Romeo and Juliet

Romeo and Juliet

by William Shakespeare

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Overview

Romeo and Juliet is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare early in his career about two young star-crossed lovers whose deaths ultimately reconcile their feuding families. It was among Shakespeare's most popular plays during his lifetime and along with Hamlet, is one of his most frequently performed plays.William Shakespeare, Shakespeare also spelled Shakspere, byname Bard of Avon or Swan of Avon, (baptized April 26, 1564, Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire, England—died April 23, 1616, Stratford-upon-Avon), English poet, dramatist, and actor, often called the English national poet and considered by many to be the greatest dramatist of all time.Shakespeare occupies a position unique in world literature. Other poets, such as Homer and Dante, and novelists, such as Leo Tolstoy and Charles Dickens, have transcended national barriers; but no writer’s living reputation can compare to that of Shakespeare, whose plays, written in the late 16th and early 17th centuries for a small repertory theatre, are now performed and read more often and in more countries than ever before. The prophecy of his great contemporary, the poet and dramatist Ben Jonson, that Shakespeare “was not of an age, but for all time,” has been fulfilled.Shakespeare was a long time coming to his tragic phase, the six or seven years that produced his five greatest tragedies—Hamlet.It may be audacious even to attempt a definition of his greatness, but it is not so difficult to describe the gifts that enabled him to create imaginative visions of pathos and mirth that, whether read or witnessed in the theatre, fill the mind and linger there. He is a writer of great intellectual rapidity, perceptiveness, and poetic power. Other writers have had these qualities, but with Shakespeare the keenness of mind was applied not to abstruse or remote subjects but to human beings and their complete range of emotions and conflicts. Other writers have applied their keenness of mind in this way, but Shakespeare is astonishingly clever with words and images, so that his mental energy, when applied to intelligible human situations, finds full and memorable expression, convincing and imaginatively stimulating. As if this were not enough, the art form into which his creative energies went was not remote and bookish but involved the vivid stage impersonation of human beings, commanding sympathy and inviting vicarious participation. Thus, Shakespeare’s merits can survive translation into other languages and into cultures remote from that of Elizabethan England.Although the amount of factual knowledge available about Shakespeare is surprisingly large for one of his station in life, many find it a little disappointing, for it is mostly gleaned from documents of an official character. Dates of baptisms, marriages, deaths, and burials; wills, conveyances, legal processes, and payments by the court—these are the dusty details. There are, however, many contemporary allusions to him as a writer, and these add a reasonable amount of flesh and blood to the biographical skeleton.For a chronological listing of Shakespeare’s plays, see below. Despite much scholarly argument, it is often impossible to date a given play precisely. But there is a general consensus, especially for plays written in 1588–1601, in 1605–07, and from 1609 onward. The dates of composition used here are based on external and internal evidence, on general stylistic and thematic considerations, and on the observation that an output of no more than two plays a year seems to have been established in those periods when dating is rather clearer than others.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781974997831
Publisher: Dreamscape Media
Publication date: 10/30/2018
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 86
File size: 337 KB
Age Range: 13 - 18 Years

About the Author

William Shakespeare was born in April 1564 in the town of Stratford-upon-Avon, on England’s Avon River. When he was eighteen, he married Anne Hathaway. The couple had three children—an older daughter Susanna and twins, Judith and Hamnet. Hamnet, Shakespeare’s only son, died in childhood. The bulk of Shakespeare’s working life was spent in the theater world of London, where he established himself professionally by the early 1590s. He enjoyed success not only as a playwright and poet, but also as an actor and shareholder in an acting company. Although some think that sometime between 1610 and 1613 Shakespeare retired from the theater and returned home to Stratford, where he died in 1616, others believe that he may have continued to work in London until close to his death.

Barbara A. Mowat is Director of Research emerita at the Folger Shakespeare Library, Consulting Editor of Shakespeare Quarterly, and author of The Dramaturgy of Shakespeare’s Romances and of essays on Shakespeare’s plays and their editing.

Paul Werstine is Professor of English at the Graduate School and at King’s University College at Western University. He is a general editor of the New Variorum Shakespeare and author of Early Modern Playhouse Manuscripts and the Editing of Shakespeare and of many papers and articles on the printing and editing of Shakespeare’s plays.

Date of Death:

2018

Place of Birth:

Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

Place of Death:

Stratford-upon-Avon, United Kingdom

Read an Excerpt

Romeo and Juliet


By WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 1993 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-11000-4


CHAPTER 1

SCENE I. Verona. A public place.


Enter SAMPSON and GREGORY, of the house of Capulet, with swords and bucklers.

SAM. Gregory, on my word, we'll not carry coals.

GRE. No, for then we should be colliers.

SAM. I mean, an we be in choler, we'll draw

GRE. Ay, while you live, draw your neck out o' the collar.

SAM. I strike quickly, being moved.

GRE. But thou art not quickly moved to strike.

SAM. A dog of the house of Montague moves me.

GRE. To move is to stir, and to be valiant is to stand: therefore, if thou art moved, thou runn'st away.

SAM. A dog of that house shall move me to stand: I will take the wall of any man or maid of Montague's.

GRE. That shows thee a weak slave; for the weakest goes to the wall.

SAM. 'Tis true; and therefore women, being the weaker vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Montague's men from the wall and thrust his maids to the wall.

GRE. The quarrel is between our masters and us their men.

SAM. 'Tis all one, I will show myself a tyrant: when I have fought with the men, I will be civil with the maids; I will cut off their heads.

GRE. The heads of the maids?

SAM. Ay, the heads of the maids, or their maidenheads; take it in what sense thou wilt.

GRE. They must take it in sense that feel it.

SAM. Me they shall feel while I am able to stand: and 'tis known I am a pretty piece of flesh.

GRE. 'Tis well thou art not fish; if thou hadst, thou hadst been poor John. Draw thy tool; here comes two of the house of Montagues.


Enter ABRAHAM and BALTHASAR.

SAM. My naked weapon is out: quarrel; I will back thee.

GRE. How! turn thy back and run?

SAM. Fear me not.

GRE. No, marry: I fear thee!

SAM. Let us take the law of our sides; let them begin.

GRE. I will frown as I pass by, and let them take it as they list.

SAM. Nay, as they dare. I will bite my thumb at them; which is a disgrace to them, if they bear it.

ABR. Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAM. I do bite my thumb, sir.

ABR. Do you bite your thumb at us, sir?

SAM. [Aside to GRE.] IS the law of our side, if I say ay?

GRE. NO.

SAM. No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir; but I bite my thumb, sir.

GRE. Do you quarrel, sir?

ABR. Quarrel, sir! no, sir.

SAM. But if you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you.

ABR. No better.

SAM. Well, sir.

Enter BENVOLIO.

GRE. [Aside to SAM.] Say 'better': here comes one of my master's kinsmen.

SAM. Yes, better, sir.

ABR. You lie.

SAM. Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow.

[They fight. [Beating down their weapons.

BEN. Part, fools! Put up your swords; you know not what you do.

Enter TYBALT.

TYB. What, art thou drawn among these heartless hinds? Turn thee, Benvolio, look upon thy death.

BEN. I do but keep the peace: put up thy sword, Or manage it to part these men with me.

TYB. What, drawn, and talk of peace! I hate the word, As I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee: Have at thee, coward!

[They fight. Enter several of both houses, who join the fray; then enter Citizens and Peace-officers, with clubs.

FIRST OFF. Clubs, bills, and partisans! strike! beat them down! Down with the Capulets! down with the Montagues!

Enter old CAPULET in his gown, and LADY CAPULET.

CAP. What noise is this? Give me my long sword, ho!

LA. CAP. A crutch, a crutch! why call you for a sword?

CAP. My sword, I say! Old Montague is come, And flourishes his blade in spite of me.

Enter old MONTAGUE and LADY MONTAGUE.

MON. Thou villain Capulet!—Hold me not, let me go.

LA. MON. Thou shalt not stir one foot to seek a foe.

Enter PRINCE ESCALUS, with his train.

PRIN. Rebellious subjects, enemies to peace,
Profaners of this neighbour-stained steel,—
Will they not hear? What, ho! you men, you beasts,
That quench the fire of your pernicious rage
With purple fountains issuing from your veins,
On pain of torture, from those bloody hands
Throw your mistemper'd weapons to the ground,
And hear the sentence of your moved prince.
Three civil brawls, bred of an airy word,
By thee, old Capulet, and Montague,
Have thrice disturb'd the quiet of our streets,
And made Verona's ancient citizens
Cast by their grave beseeming ornaments,
To wield old partisans, in hands as old,
Cankere'd with peace, to part your canker'd hate:
If ever you disturb our streets again,
Your lives shall pay the forfeit of the peace.
For this time, all the rest depart away:
You, Capulet, shall go along with me;
And, Montague, come you this afternoon,
To know our farther pleasure in this case,
To old Free-town, our common judgement-place.
Once more, on pain of death, all men depart.

[Exeunt all but MONTAGUE, LADY MONTAGUE, and BENVOLIO.

MON. Who set this ancient quarrel new abroach? Speak, nephew, were you by when it began?

BEN. Here were the servants of your adversary
And yours close fighting ere I did approach:
I drew to part them: in the instant came
The fiery Tybalt, with his sword prepared;
Which, as he breathed defiance to my ears,
He swung about his head, and cut the winds,
Who, nothing hurt withal, hiss'd him in scorn:
While we were interchanging thrusts and blows,
Came more and more, and fought on part and part,
Till the Prince came, who parted either part.

LA. MON. O, where is Romeo? saw you him to-day? Right glad I am he was not at this fray.

BEN. Madam, an hour before the worshipp'd sun
Peer'd forth the golden window of the east,
A troubled mind drave me to walk abroad;
Where, underneath the grove of sycamore
That westward rooteth from the city's side,
So early walking did I see your son:
Towards him I made; but he was ware of me,
And stole into the covert of the wood:
I, measuring his affections by my own,
Which then most sought where most might not be found,
Being one too many by my weary self,
Pursued my humour, not pursuing his,
And gladly shunn'd who gladly fled from me.

MON. Many a morning hath he there been seen,
With tears augmenting the fresh morning's dew,
Adding to clouds more clouds with his deep sighs:
But all so soon as the all-cheering sun
Should in the farthest east begin to draw
The shady curtains from Aurora's bed,
Away from light steals home my heavy son,
And private in his chamber pens himself,
Shuts up his windows, locks fair daylight out,
And makes himself an artificial night:
Black and portentous must this humour prove,
Unless good counsel may the cause remove.

BEN. My noble uncle, do you know the cause?

MON. I neither know it nor can learn of him.

BEN. Have you importuned him by any means?

MON. Both by myself and many other friends:
But he, his own affections' counsellor,
Is to himself—I will not say how true—
But to himself so secret and so close,
So far from sounding and discovery,
As is the bud bit with an envious worm,
Ere he can spread his sweet leaves to the air,
Or dedicate his beauty to the sun.
Could we but learn from whence his sorrows grow;
We would as willingly give cure as know.

Enter ROMEO.

BEN. See, where he comes: so please you step aside; I'll know his grievance, or be much denied.

MON. I would thou wert so happy by thy stay, To hear true shrift. Come, madam, let's away.

[Exeunt MONTAGUE and LADY.

BEN. Good morrow; cousin.

ROM. IS the day so young?

BEN. But new struck nine.

ROM. Ay me! sad hours seem long. Was that my father that went hence so fast?

BEN. It was. What sadness lengthens Romeo's hours?

ROM. Not having that which, having, makes them short. BEN. In love?

ROM. Out—

BEN. Of love?

ROM. Out of her favour, where I am in love.

BEN. Alas, that love, so gentle in his view, Should be so tyrannous and rough in proof!

ROM. Alas, that love, whose view is muffled still,
Should without eyes see pathways to his will!
Where shall we dine? O me! What fray was here?
Yet tell me not, for I have heard it all.
Here's much to do with hate, but more with love:
Why, then, O brawling love! O loving hate!
O any thing, of nothing first create!
O heavy lightness! serious vanity!
Mis-shapen chaos of well-seeming forms!
Feather of lead, bright smoke, cold fire, sick health!
Still-waking sleep, that is not what it is!
This love feel I, that feel no love in this.
Dost thou not laugh?

BEN. NO, COZ, I rather weep.

ROM. Good heart, at what?

BEN. At thy good heart's oppression.

ROM. Why, such is love's transgression.
Griefs of mine own lie heavy in my breast;
Which thou wilt propagate, to have it prest
With more of thine: this love that thou hast shown
Doth add more grief to too much of mine own.
Love is a smoke raised with the fume of sighs;
Being purged, a fire sparkling in lovers' eyes;
Being vex'd, a sea nourish'd with lovers' tears:
What is it else? a madness most discreet,
A choking gall and a preserving sweet.
Farewell, my coz.

BEN. Soft! I will go along: An if you leave me so, you do me wrong.

ROM. Tut, I have lost myself; I am not here; This is not Romeo, he's some other where.

BEN. Tell me in sadness, who is that you love?

ROM. What, shall I groan and tell thee?

BEN. Groan! why, no; But sadly tell me who.

ROM. Bid a sick man in sadness make his will:
Ah, word ill urged to one that is so ill!
In sadness, cousin, I do love a woman.

BEN. I aim'd so near when I supposed you loved.

ROM. A right good mark-man! And she's fair I love.

BEN. A right fair mark, fair coz, is soonest hit.

ROM. Well, in that hit you miss: she'll not be hit
With Cupid's arrow; she hath Dian's wit,
And in strong proof of chastity well arm'd,
From love's weak childish bow she lives unharm'd.
She will not stay the siege of loving terms,
Nor bide the encounter of assailing eyes,
Nor ope her lap to saint-seducing gold:
O, she is rich in beauty, only poor
That, when she dies, with beauty dies her store.

BEN. Then she hath sworn that she will still live chaste?

ROM. She hath, and in that sparing makes huge waste;
For beauty, starved with her severity,
Cuts beauty off from all posterity.
She is too fair, too wise, wisely too fair,
To merit bliss by making me despair:
She hath forsworn to love; and in that vow
Do I live dead, that live to tell it now.

BEN. Be ruled by me, forget to think of her.

ROM. O, teach me how I should forget to think.

BEN. By giving liberty unto thine eyes; Examine other beauties.

ROM. 'Tis the way
To call hers, exquisite, in question more:
These happy masks that kiss fair ladies' brows,
Being black, put us in mind they hide the fair;
He that is strucken blind cannot forget
The precious treasure of his eyesight lost:
Show me a mistress that is passing fair,
What doth her beauty serve but as a note
Where I may read who pass'd that passing fair?
Farewell: thou canst not teach me to forget.

BEN. I'll pay that doctrine, or else die in debt.

[Exeunt.


SCENE II. A street

Enter CAPULET, PARIS, and Servant.

CAP. But Montague is bound as well as I,
In penalty alike; and 'tis not hard, I think,
For men so old as we to keep the peace.

PAR. Of honourable reckoning are you both;
And pity 'tis you lived at odds so long.
But now, my lord, what say you to my suit?

CAP. But saying o'er what I have said before:
My child is yet a stranger in the world;
She hath not seen the change of fourteen years:
Let two more summers wither in their pride
Ere we may think her ripe to be a bride.

PAR. Younger than she are happy mothers made.

CAP. And too soon marr'd are those so early made.
The earth hath swallow'd all my hopes but she,
She is the hopeful lady of my earth:
But woo her, gentle Paris, get her heart;
My will to her consent is but a part;
An she agree, within her scope of choice
Lies my consent and fair according voice.
This night I hold an old accustom'd feast,
Whereto I have invited many a guest,
Such as I love; and you among the store,
One more, most welcome, makes my number more.
At my poor house look to behold this night
Earth-treading stars that make dark heaven light:
Such comfort as do lusty young men feel
When well-apparell'd April on the heel
Of limping winter treads, even such delight
Among fresh female buds shall you this night
Inherit at my house; hear all, all see,
And like her most whose merit most shall be:
Which on more view, of many mine being one
May stand in number, though in reckoning none.
Come, go with me. [To Servant] Go, sirrah, trudge about
Through fair Verona; find those persons out
Whose names are written there, and to them say,
My house and welcome on their pleasure stay.

[Exeunt CAPULET and PARIS.

SERV. Find them out whose names are written here! It is written that the shoemaker should meddle with his yard and the tailor with his last, the fisher with his pencil and the painter with his nets; but I am sent to find those persons whose names are here writ, and can never find what names the writing person hath here writ. I must to the learned. In good time.

Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO.

BEN. Tut, man, one fire burns out another's burning.
One pain is lessen'd by another's anguish;
Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning;
One desperate grief cures with another's languish:
Take thou some new infection to thy eye,
And the rank poison of the old will die.

ROM. Your plantain-leaf is excellent for that.

BEN. For what, I pray thee?

ROM. For your broken shin.

BEN. Why, Romeo, art thou mad?

ROM. Not mad, but bound more than a madman is;
Shut up in prison, kept without my food,
Whipt and tormented and— God-den, good fellow.

SERV. God gi' god-den. I pray, sir, can you read?

ROM. Ay, mine own fortune in my misery.

SERV. Perhaps you have learned it without book: but, I pray, can you read any thing you see?

ROM. Ay, if I know the letters and the language.

SERV Ye say honestly: rest you merry!

ROM. Stay, fellow; I can read.

[Reads.

'Signior Martino and his wife and daughters; County Anselme and his beauteous sisters; the lady widow of Vitruvio; Signior Placentio and his lovely nieces; Mercutio and his brother Valentine; mine uncle Capulet, his wife, and daughters; my fair niece Rosaline; Livia; Signior Valentio and his cousin Tybalt; Lucio and the lively Helena.'

A fair assembly: whither should they come?

SERVUp.

ROM. Whither? to supper?

SERV. TO our house.

ROM. Whose house?

SERV. My master's.

ROM. Indeed, I should have ask'd you that before.

SERV. Now I'll tell you without asking: my master is the great rich Capulet; and if you be not of the house of Montagues, I pray, come and crush a cup of wine. Rest you merry!

[Exit.

BEN. At this same ancient feast of Capulet's
Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so lovest,
With all the admired beauties of Verona:
Go thither, and with unattainted eye
Compare her face with some that I shall show,
And I will make thee think thy swan a crow

ROM. When the devout religion of mine eye
Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;
And these, who, often drown'd, could never die,
Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars!
One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun
Ne'er saw her match since first the world begun.

BEN. Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by,
Herself poised with herself in either eye:
But in that crystal scales let there be weighed
Your lady's love against some other maid,
That I will show you shining at this feast,
And she shall scant show well that now seems best.

ROM. I'll go along, no such sight to be shown,
But to rejoice in splendour of mine own.

[Exeunt.


SCENE III. A room in Capulet's house.

Enter LADY CAPULET and NURSE.

LA. CAP. Nurse, where's my daughter? call her forth to me.

NURSE. NOW, by my maidenhead at twelve year old,
I bade her come. What, lamb! what, lady-bird!
God forbid!—Where's this girl? What, Juliet!


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Romeo and Juliet by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE. Copyright © 1993 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Romeo and Juliet - William Shakespeare - Edited by J. A. Bryant, Jr. Samuel Johnson: From The Plays of William Shakespeare
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: From The Lectures of 1811-1812, Lecture VII
H. B. Charlton: From Shakespearian Tragedy
Michael Goldman: ?Romeo and Juliet?: The Meaning of Theatrical Experience
Susan Snyder: Beyond Comedy: ?Romeo and Juliet?
Sylvan Barnet: ?Romeo and Juliet? on the Stage and Screen

NEWLY ADDED ESSAYS:
Marianne Novy: Violence, Love, and Gender in ?Romeo and Juliet?

What People are Saying About This

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'… beautifully edited … and presented' The Daily Telegraph

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Romeo and Juliet 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 572 reviews.
Bob Watkins More than 1 year ago
Romeo and Juliet is a tale of doomed love. I think the movie Gnomeo and Juliet, while being good, is offensive to Shakespeare's masterpiece. I enjoy it very much. And I'm almost 11 and a half! But I understood Shakespeare's beautiful language well. Want to know my secret? A series called "Shakspeare Made Easy." On one page is Shakespeare's beautiful language, and on the other is the translation. This series is not available on the nook, but you can always find it at your local library. I recommend this book for everyone with a vast vocabulary. To put long words in short, Romeo and Juliet is a tragically beautiful story.
Reid Martin More than 1 year ago
This was a very good book and I enjoyed this book through out. I feel that there is alot to learn from this book. Shakespeare's connotation and diction really help the reader to understand and evaluate the interests of William Shakespeare himself. The reader can really see the chemistry between Romeo and Juliet because Shakespeare is so descriptive in his writings. Juliet's fate was determined ultimatly through fate. It was fate that brought Romeo and Juliet together, and it was fate that made their families enemies. Other characters in his play that comtributed to Juliet's demise would be Juliet's Nurse, Friar Lawrence, Capulet, and pretty much every other chacacter in his play. William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet was a very good book and I would highly recomend it! :)?
ChristineNg More than 1 year ago
A great classic Shakespeare tale of love and tragedy, but this book takes each part, and translates it into modern, easy-to-read English. What struck me while reading is how little people have changed in 500 years, obsessed with sex appeal, status, and envy of their neighbors.  
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love this book and i am only in 5th grade! Read it its the best!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I wanted a book not a play but it is very good
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was truly outstanding I loved it.I wanted to cry it was such an amazing book full of drama and such suspition. I understood it more than my 15 year old sibiling. I also loved the language that Shakespeare used it was so unique and vigorous. If I could I would read it every day for the rest of my life. It was very honorable to read this book.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was really good. At first I found it hard to care about Romeo and Juliet but the words and descriptions caught my eyes. Then I could not stop reading. I really like Shakespear's style of writing.
Guest More than 1 year ago
When I started reading it, it caught my attention and I did not want to put it down. It has been one of the most best plays I have read and a really interesting one. When you read it, you won't want to put it down either.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book in my English class and loved it! It is really a great book, and the 'mush' is overrated! If you're a fan of Shakespeare (like I am) than you should really pick up a copy!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book was really good. even though it was written such a long time ago, it sort of deals with the troubles that teens go through today when their parent(s) do not approve with the person they are daitng. Teens can reaaly relate to this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You went through some pretty shi.tty times in your life. Youre insecure and have issues trusting people. You have social anxiety and a guitar obsession. But you made a good decision in asking me out. Cause i promise that i will treat you like the angel you are. Everyone else you dated was abusive? You dont need to worry about any of that with me. I made a promise to keep you safe and help you heal those emotional scars. You mean the world to me, and I want you to know that i will do absolutely anything for you. You helped me heal my emotional and physical scars, now let me take care of you. Let me give you the endless attention you secretly crave. Let me shower you with the affection your too embarrassed to admit you want. You deserve to be treated like a prince, honey. Let me be the one to do that &hearts
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
well hey there you. i'll definitely tell you about this because i want you to gush over me. :)) where do i begin? i've known you for quite awhile now, nearly four years. we never were close until recently, when you stoooollleeee myyyy hearrrttt. we just started talking outside of rp and i was like wowza this better be a dude and you were and i was like double wowza ily. it was more serious then that. xD you have the kindest soul, and i love it. you care for me dearly, and I the same. you /ARE/ cute, like super duper cute, and i will continue to tell you this until the end of time. even though you did look a little feminine, but it WAS JUST THE FILTER I SWEAR. okay, ily with all my heart. bbg. &hearts
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well...crab...im a little freaked out right now... cuz....of things... I know he would never like me back let alone love me. He never looks at me the way he looks at her. If she lied to him or upset him..i bet he would always forgives her. It breaks my heart how he always pushes me away. But i always stand up for her. I could never tell him because i would never want to hurt her.... im not sure how i live with out him.. or i even remember to breathe with his absence... sides im not her.. he would never want me..... he says he cant trust me. I wish he would give me another chance. To show him how much i want him. It hurts... i love him so much it hurts.. i want him so much it hurts.... i dunno wat to do...he hasnt been on in forever... i miss him.
rose5716 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Romeo and Juliet has to be the greatest love story of all time. The comic and dramatic words of Shakespeare are simply breath taking. I loved the irony and always knowing what was going to happen at the end, but hoping, somehow some way their fate would not be true. This book gave me chills on almost every page. I think that the characters are very interesting and you can picture each one as you read. Reading the book as a script was also enjoyable because I was able to hear each character's voice in my head. This was a phenomenal book, and I would recommend it to anyone up for the challenging word plays, because it is well worth it.
kswanteck on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The story of Romeo and Juliet is classic...star crossed lovers from two different families who are in love and end up dying for their love. This is a good book to practice many things: decoding an unfamiliar language, acting out scenes, and analyzing character development (among others). Its overall theme of adolescent love is one that students will be able to relate to.
john257hopper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My favourite Shakespeare play, so stuffed full of quotes that have become famous, it's almost a dictionary of quotations. Wonderful language and a timeless, simple plot.
ablueidol on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Yes studied at school but I have seen it at Stratford with my wife on a wedding anniversary. I had the pleasure of criticising the production and performance and then seeing this confirmed by the theatre critics in the serious papers-evidence that some of the reading and study has sank in!
ctpress on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
For never was a story of more woe¿Than this of Juliet and her Romeo.Reading a Shakespeare-play and seeing one is two entirely different things. Having been to the Globe in London and experienced the magic of an evening with Shakespeare it seems a dry thing to "just" read the play. Still, reading it offers time to stop and contemplate and enjoy and savour all the famous quotes and lines of poetry.In this romantic tragedy there's plenty of over-the-top emotions, frantic pace, overwhelming love-songs and declarations of eternal bliss or eternal sorrow - it's just a thing you accept coming to Shakespeare. This is his world and it's just for us to drink it in.And although it's exaggerated the theme is eternal and universal - love - mixed with infatuation and madness - it's a force too powerful to be kept down - and it's explosive in the midst of a feud between two families. This emotional tour de force between Romeo and Juliet is something to be appraised and lamented at the same time. I'm not sure what Shakespeare does most. But both things are there. The admiration of such head-over-the-heels love and the warning against it's power to overwhelm and blinding the persons involved. Good Night, Good night! Parting is such sweet sorrow
MissBoyer3 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When two star-crossed lovers meet, it's love at first sight. Despite being from rival families, Romeo and Juliet forsake their own families and risk everything to be together, which ends in tragedy.
brettjames on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You know, it's a play written in the sixteen hundreds. Not a bad read as far as these things go, but only the sort of thing you read in school or when you're going to put on the play
junesong on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Such a beautiful and tragic story. One of Shakespeare's best.
LisaMaria_C on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Just cultural literacy alone demands you read this play; which I actually think is among Shakespeare's most readable and lyrical, with indelible, lovely lines. It ranks among my favorite of his because of the way he both expresses the beauty of young love as well as the potential destructiveness of adolescent passions in which, unfortunately, Romeo and Juliet are well-matched. I remember a teacher once explaining how character propels plot through Shakespeare plays. If Othello had been inserted into Hamlet's plot and vice versa there would have been no tragedy. Othello wouldn't have hesitated to destroy Claudius and Hamlet would have thoroughly investigated before killing Desdemona. In this play Romeo and Juliet each pull each other towards the tragedy, their immaturity and overwhelmed emotions as much the linchpin as their family's feuds. Of course, there's nothing like seeing this dramatized. I rather love the 1968 film directed by Franco Zeffirelli. A traditional approach with actors of the right ages to fit their roles.
AEbert on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Romeo and Juliet is a romantic play written by the famous playwright William Shakespeare. This play shows an in-depth story about two lovers who suffer a tragic end. Their love is denied through the play because the two Montague and Capulet families are sworn enemies. This book is written from many different perspectives and characters. This book focuses on the two main characters, Romeo and Juliet, but it also focuses on many other characters; such as Friar Lawrence, Tybalt and Benvolio.Romeo and Juliet tells the tragic tale of two star crossed lovers who met by fate. Their fateful meeting was followed by a series of unfortunate events after they found out they were sworn enemies by name. The Montague and Capulet families had been fighting each other for centuries but Romeo and Juliet found each other and were united by love. Romeo hastily proposed to Juliet and they were married by Friar Lawrence. Their marriage had to be kept secret and they were in constant danger of being caught together.Romeo and Juliet is a very sad story that ends in tragedy and death. Both the main characters die at the end play after they making many bad choices and by keeping their marriage secret. This book was originated from the famous play `Romeo and Juliet¿ which was written and directed by William Shakespeare. Shakespeare used smart writing techniques to engage the audience and readers. Romeo and Juliet¿s unfortunate deaths are caused by bad choices made by close friends and enemies. Throughout the play, both Romeo and Juliet constantly tempt their fate by making bad choices, which finally ends in their unfortunate, early demise. In the end, Romeo and Juliet both suffer a painful and emotional death which was caused by bad choices and unlucky timing; this is the classic ending of William Shakespeare¿s famous play `Romeo and Juliet¿.In my opinion, I think that Romeo and Juliet is a very confusing book but it is also very exciting and enjoyable. Shakespeare indelicately uses insults and cussing in arguments instead of harsh swearing or foul language. By doing this, he makes the reader think about what the characters are saying and it makes the book much more interesting. This book has unfortunate and avoidable deaths which intensify situations and make the book more emotional. I rate this book 9 out of 10 because it was a perfectly written book over 500 years ago, and even till this day, it is still considered one of the best plays/books ever written.
EmilyRB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
William Shakespeare's epic tale of comedy, tragedy, and love is a staple for romantic literature. When two adolescents from feuding families fall in love, their destinys' suddenly become intertwined, with neither able to live without the other.
ayumig on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I have thought that I want to read this book in japanese but I have never read . This time I read this book in English , I felt so painful that I cryed their fortune . I think this story is not only love story but also terrible sad story . Romeo and Juliet fallen in love each other . But their Family : The Capulet Family and The Montague Family . At last they died aothough they did not need to die . Now I want to fall in love my prince who love only me !!