ISBN-10:
1441145753
ISBN-13:
9781441145758
Pub. Date:
10/21/2010
Publisher:
Bloomsbury Academic
Rethinking U.S. Labor History: Essays on the Working-Class Experience, 1756-2009

Rethinking U.S. Labor History: Essays on the Working-Class Experience, 1756-2009

by Donna T. Haverty-Stacke, Daniel J. Walkowitz
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Overview

Labor History has recently undergone something of a renaissance that has yet to be documented. Rethinking U.S. Labor History chronicles this rejuvenation with contributions from new scholars as well as established names.

This unique collection of essays blends the work of senior labor historians with that of young scholars working at the frontiers of what we think will be the field's future. All express a continued interest in questions surrounding the relationship of class and culture, especially the association between the changing experience of class and the broader context of American political culture. Their work also reflects a revived interest in the links between workers' experience and the changing political economy, especially as American workers confront the continued flight of manufacturing jobs and the transformation of the nation's retail sector.

Rethinking U.S. Labor History aims to serve as both a practical and substantive contribution to the field of labor history and a comment on its current state and future prospects. The essays demonstrate that the state of labor history today is strong and its possibilities for the future bright.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781441145758
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic
Publication date: 10/21/2010
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 352
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Donna Haverty-Stacke is Associate Professor of History at Hunter College, CUNY. She is the author of America's Forgotten Holiday: May Day and Nationalism, 1867-1960 (NYU Press, 2009).

Daniel Walkowitz is Director of Experiential Education, Acting Director of Metropolitan Studies, Professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, and Professor of History at New York University. He is an American social historian who specializes in labor, urban, and working-class history. Over the past thirty years, Walkowitz has authored over thirty articles and co-edited or authored six books. His most recent books are Working With Class: Social Workers and the Politics of Middle-Class Identity (North Carolina, 1999), and, co-edited with Lisa Maya Knauer, Memory and the Impact of Political Transformation in Public Spaces (Duke, 2004). He is also General Editor for the ten-volume Social History of the United States, forthcoming fromABC-Clio.

Read an Excerpt

It is, I believe, nearly impossible not to love this book. The care and patience with which it is written, the incisiveness of its observations, its humor, its intellectual rigor, its compassion — all these qualities reinforce one another to make it an important, memorable work. . . . It is the true story of a man's experiences, and it asks nothing but the most essential questions: how is information communicated to an anthropologist, what kinds of transactions take place between one culture and another, under what circumstances might secrets be kept? In delineating this unknown civilization for us, Clastres writes with the cunning of a good novelist.

Table of Contents

Contributors vii

Introduction Donna T. Haverty-Stacke Daniel J. Walkowitz 1

Part I Current Research

Chapter 1 Memoirs of an Invalid: James Miller and the Making of the British-American Empire in the Seven Years' War Peter Way 25

Chapter 2 Losing the Middle Ground: Strikebreakers and Labor Protest on the Southwestern Railroads Theresa Ann Case 54

Chapter 3 Rethinking Working-Class Politics in Comparative-Transnational Contexts Shelton Stromquist 82

Chapter 4 No Common Creed: White Working-Class Protestants and the CIO's Operation Dixie Elizabeth Fones-Wolf Ken Fones-Wolf 111

Chapter 5 A. Philip Randolph, Black Anticommunism, and the Race Question Eric Arnesen 137

Chapter 6 The Contextualization of a Moment in CIO History: The Mine-Mill Battle in the Connecticut Brass Valley during World War II Steve Rosswurm 168

Chapter 7 Organizing the Carework Economy: When the Private Becomes Public Eileen Boris Jennifer Klein 192

Chapter 9 Solvents of Solidarity: Political Economy, Collective Action, and the Crisis of Organized Labor, 1968-2005 Joseph A. McCartin 217

Part II New Directions in U.S. Labor History

Chapter 9 Sensing Labor: The Stinking Working-Class after the Cultural Turn Daniel E. Bender 243

Chapter 10 Re-Imagining Labor: Gender and New Directions in Labor and Working-Class History Elizabeth Faue 266

Chapter 11 The Limits of Work and the Subject of Labor History Zachary Schwartz-Weinstein 289

Part III Resources

Labor and Working-Class History Chronology 307

Resources 317

Further Reading 320

Index 329

What People are Saying About This

Paul Auster

It is, I believe, nearly impossible not to love this book. The care and patience with which it is written, the incisiveness of its observations, its humor, its intellectual rigor, its compassion -- all these qualities reinforce one another to make it an important, memorable work.

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