Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era

Remaking Black Power: How Black Women Transformed an Era

by Ashley D. Farmer

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

In this comprehensive history, Ashley D. Farmer examines black women's political, social, and cultural engagement with Black Power ideals and organizations. Complicating the assumption that sexism relegated black women to the margins of the movement, Farmer demonstrates how female activists fought for more inclusive understandings of Black Power and social justice by developing new ideas about black womanhood. This compelling book shows how the new tropes of womanhood that they created—the "Militant Black Domestic," the "Revolutionary Black Woman," and the "Third World Woman," for instance—spurred debate among activists over the importance of women and gender to Black Power organizing, causing many of the era's organizations and leaders to critique patriarchy and support gender equality.

Making use of a vast and untapped array of black women's artwork, political cartoons, manifestos, and political essays that they produced as members of groups such as the Black Panther Party and the Congress of African People, Farmer reveals how black women activists reimagined black womanhood, challenged sexism, and redefined the meaning of race, gender, and identity in American life.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781469654737
Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press
Publication date: 08/01/2019
Series: Justice, Power, and Politics
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 614,373
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.80(d)

About the Author

Ashley D. Farmer is assistant professor of history and African and African Diaspora Studies at the University of Texas-Austin

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

Farmer's astute reading of visuals and print culture produced by black women not only resets the chronological clock of the Black Power era but also shifts our gaze from the well-worn paternalistic utterings of male leaders to women who imagined empowerment on their own terms by developing ideologies, rituals, and texts that redefined who they were and, in some cases, who they wanted to be.—Ula Yvette Taylor, author of The Promise of Patriarchy

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