Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods

Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods

by Nina Planck

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Overview

Ten years ago, Nina Planck changed the way we think about what we eat with the groundbreaking Real Food. And when Nina became pregnant, she took the same hard look at the nutritional advice for pregnancy and newborns, finding a tangle of often contradictory guidelines that seemed at odds with her own common sense.

In Real Food for Mother and Baby, Nina explains why some commonly held ideas about pregnancy and infant nutrition are wrongheaded—and why real food is good for growing minds and bodies. While her general concept isn't surprising, some of the details might be. For expecting mothers and babies up to two years old, the body's overwhelming requirements are fat and protein, not vegetables and low-fat dairy—which is why, for example, cereals aren't right for babies, but meat and egg yolks are excellent.

Nina shares tips and advice like a trusted friend, and in this updated edition, her afterword presents the latest findings and some newly won wisdom from watching her three children grow on real food.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781632864598
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA
Publication date: 05/10/2016
Pages: 288
Sales rank: 838,718
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.20(h) x 0.90(d)

About the Author

Nina Planck is a farmers' daughter, food writer, and farmers' market entrepreneur. She is the creator of the wildly popular London Farmers' Markets. A gifted speaker and a home cook, she is the author of Real Food: What to Eat and Why as well as The Farmers' Market Cookbook and The Real Food Cookbook. She lives in New York City and Stockton, New Jersey, with her husband, Rob Kaufelt, proprietor of Murray's Cheese, and their three children.

NinaPlanck.com

@ninaplanck

Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Chapter 1 What is Real Food? 5

Real Food Defined 5

Real Milk 12

Real Meat, Poultry, and Eggs 17

Real Fish 21

Real Fruit and Vegetables 23

Real Fats 26

Real Bread 33

Real Food Rules 36

Chapter 2 The Fertility Diet 41

Traditional Fertility Foods 41

Four Fertility Rules 46

The Modern Fertility Diet 55

Five Easy Pieces 57

The Sperm Team 65

A Population of One 70

Chapter 3 Forty Weeks 78

Mother and Baby in the First Trimester 78

Knocked Out Loaded 79

More Blood 88

A Glass of Wine? 91

Green in the Gills 94

Red Meat Is Ironclad 98

Mother and Baby in the Second Trimester 101

Prenatal Scare 105

An Ounce of Prevention 110

The Day I Forgot I Was Pregnant 114

Mother and Baby in the Third Trimester 118

Brain Food 121

Not a Tax Return 124

Birth Day 128

Chapter 4 Nursing Your Baby 134

Very Soggy Indeed 134

Pro-Life 139

Your Milk and Your Diet 143

The Queen of Fats 152

Harder Than It Looks 158

When You Cannot Nurse Your Baby 165

Cache or Carry? 170

Tips and Myths 178

Chapter 5 First Foods 185

East of Eden 185

Readiness Is All 189

Baby Foods 190

The Scientific Feeding Method 203

Baby Drinks 207

I Get in Hot Water over Vegan Babies 212

Bread and Chocolate 215

Cod Liver Oil Comes Back 221

Bye Bye, Delicious Milk 224

The State of Real Food, Circa 1940 227

Acknowledgments 231

Resources 233

Notes 241

Bibliography 257

Index 261

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Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby's First Foods 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
DevourerOfBooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nina Planck is a proponent of `real food.¿ She had even written a book on the topic, and was touring for said book when she discovered she was pregnant. As a food activist, Nina did her research about eating before, during, and after pregnancy, as well as feeding young children. When the conventional wisdom sounded wrong to her, she dug deeper to find out what really is best for mothers and babies.This book is broken into 5 parts: What is Real Food; The Fertility Diet; Forty Weeks; Nursing Your Baby; and First Foods. The most important thing to know is probably Nina¿s definition of real food. Real food is ¿old and traditional.¿ If someone hasn¿t been eating it for hundreds of years, you probably shouldn¿t either.What I really liked about this book was Nina¿s approach. While scientific she was also very relational, sharing her experiences of pregnancy, nursing, and feeding her young baby. She laid out what sorts of foods one should eat and why, but she was not dictatorial about it and suggested certain supplements if you simply cannot eat that food for one reason or another.This book is quite informative and an engaging read at the same time. If you have enjoyed any of Michael Pollan¿s books or articles on food and are pregnant, have a young child, or are considering getting pregnant, this is something worth picking up.
DonnerLibrary on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Nina Planck is an advocate for what she calls 'real food.' These are the staples of our ancestors, prepared in traditional ways. Fruits, vegetables, eggs, meats, cheese, and milk minimally processed if processed at all. Planck provides compelling arguments for eating this way based on nutritional comparisons.While some of the ideas she presents for general eating and eating during pregnancy fall quite far from mainstream thinking, she does provide science to back up her claims. The stories she shares of her own pregnancy and how it shaped her diet are interesting. Although there were some aspects of her experiences that I would not have shared during my own pregnancy (such as having glasses of wine), I was able to take away some good information from this section of the book.Planck lost me, however, when it came to the section on baby's first foods. Essentially she fed her son chunks of various table foods almost from the beginning of his solid food experience. While I do not doubt the nutritional value of the foods she was feeding him, my concern is that some of the foods she mentioned would present a potential choking hazard. I simply cannot imagine letting my eight month old daughter chew on a pork chop! Planck also threw out all conventional wisdom regarding babies and allergies, giving her son many foods before his first birthday that most doctors do not recommend.I enjoyed reading this book and I do feel that I learned something from it. I think each person reading this book will have to find their own comfort level with the information presented and take what they can use while leaving the rest behind.
ladydzura on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While I¿m not yet at that point in my life where I¿m settling down and getting married and having babies, I really enjoyed reading through Real Food for Mother and Baby: The Fertility Diet, Eating for Two, and Baby¿s First Foods by Nina Planck. It¿s loaded with information about food and nutrition while maintaining an easy-to-read style, and perhaps best of all, it doesn¿t preach. Planck tells you what she knows ¿ which is, admittedly, a lot, and she brings in the experts to verify what she¿s saying, so you don¿t have to take only her word on it ¿ and she relates stories about her own pregnancy, but then she leaves it up to you to decide what¿s best for your body and your baby.The book is broken down into five sections, beginning with the chapter entitled `What is Real Food?¿ that starts with a basic explanation of, you guessed it, what the author calls `real food¿: the old and the traditional. Foods that were eaten long before food became part of an industry, foods that aren¿t processed within an inch of their life, and foods that haven¿t been enhanced and added-to before they¿re sold are the staples of the `real food¿ diet. Planck then moves on to chapters covering `The Fertility Diet¿ [what to eat when you¿re trying to conceive, and what foods best prepare your body for the rigors of pregnancy], `Forty Weeks¿ [how the foods you eat can influence your baby¿s development], `Nursing Your Baby¿ [championing the benefits of breastfeeding over formula use], and `First Foods¿ [introducing your child to something a little more solid]. The back of the book also provides a list of resources for further reading on a range of topics, from postnatal depression to autism and allergies and various birthing techniques.Overall, this is a stellar book. Like I said, I¿m nowhere near ready for the baby-specific information, but I read this book cover to cover, and it¿s now full of post-it flags for easier future reference. I¿ve found myself returning to the first chapter on foods basics more than once. A lot of what Planck presents just makes sense, and with so much information and misinformation floating around in the media ¿ eggs are bad! no, wait, eggs are good! ¿ it¿s great to have something to fall back on when everything gets confusing. I¿ve even broken it out when having baby-related discussions with friends and plan on presenting a copy or two as gifts to friends in the future. And, yeah, maybe I do look forward to using the information for my own personal use some day.
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nina Planck is an advocate for what she calls 'real food.' These are the staples of our ancestors, prepared in traditional ways. Fruits, vegetables, eggs, meats, cheese, and milk minimally processed if processed at all. Planck provides compelling arguments for eating this way based on nutritional comparisons. While some of the ideas she presents for general eating and eating during pregnancy fall quite far from mainstream thinking, she does provide science to back up her claims. The stories she shares of her own pregnancy and how it shaped her diet are interesting. Although there were some aspects of her experiences that I would not have shared during my own pregnancy (such as having glasses of wine), I was able to take away some good information from this section of the book. Planck lost me, however, when it came to the section on baby's first foods. Essentially she fed her son chunks of various table foods almost from the beginning of his solid food experience. While I do not doubt the nutritional value of the foods she was feeding him, my concern is that some of the foods she mentioned would present a potential choking hazard. I simply cannot imagine letting my eight month old daughter chew on a pork chop! Planck also threw out all conventional wisdom regarding babies and allergies, giving her son many foods before his first birthday that most doctors do not recommend. I enjoyed reading this book and I do feel that I learned something from it. I think each person reading this book will have to find their own comfort level with the information presented and take what they can use while leaving the rest behind.