Press Pause Before You Eat: Say Good-bye to Mindless Eating and Hello to the Joys of Eating

Press Pause Before You Eat: Say Good-bye to Mindless Eating and Hello to the Joys of Eating

by Linda Mintle

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Overview

In a world that acts before it thinks, it’s time to “press pause”...

Press Pause Before You Eat and say goodbye to hurried and mindless eating. This ground-breaking book shines a light on the most overlooked area of our relationship with food: mindless and unintentional eating. It teaches readers to understand WHY they eat and provides practical, proven strategies to control eating. Diets treat symptoms; Press Pause Before You Eat deals with the root causes of unintentional eating and restores the joys of mindful eating. Busy schedules translate into eating on the run or skipping meals altogether. Life is not only filled with multitasking and hurried moments but on-the-go consumption. Eating becomes a thing to do while doing other things and all too often becomes a source of guilt and distress. The more stressed and busier people feel, the more food becomes a source of gratification, relief and a numbing agent, as well as a welcomed friend. In order to address the current obesity epidemic and struggles people have with their weight, a new approach is needed—one that addresses the emotional, relational, and spiritual side of the individual and his or her relationship to food.

Dr. Linda Mintle, a licensed professional in clinical practice

and a specialist in eating disorders, knows that unless

people are coached to be intentional about their eating, they

will continue to eat mindlessly and be part of the 90-95 percent

of failed dieters. Therefore, Press Pause Before You Eat

is a prescriptive guide for intentionally cultivating a mindful

awareness of eating that attends to the body, soul, and spirit.

Food is not our enemy; it is something to be enjoyed!

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781439148648
Publisher: Howard Books
Publication date: 05/26/2009
Edition description: Original
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 828,710
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

Dr. Linda Mintle is a national expert on marriage, family and eating issues. She received her Ph.D. from Old Dominion University in Urban Health Services and Clinical Psychology, and she has a Master’s degree in Social Work and Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Communications, both from Western Michigan University. Married for thirty-three years, the mother of two teenagers, Dr. Linda resides in Virginia. She loves to travel, entertain, and walk her puppy, Zoe Jolie.

Read an Excerpt

1

Press Pause:
It Takes Only a Moment

Suzy and I took our usual places in the overstuffed chairs in our favorite coffee shop. As we sipped our tall, skinny, one-pump decaf mochas, her eyes kept wandering to the display case of pastries. She seemed unusually distracted. "Suzy, I know my problem with the rabbits eating my begonias is not exactly front-page news, but you seem distracted. Is everything okay?"

"Huh? Oh, yeah, I guess so. I was just looking at those pastries in the display case. They look so tempting. I would really like an apple fritter with my coffee. My mouth is watering just thinking about it, but I know I shouldn't eat it. I've got to lose ten pounds. Oh, what the heck, I'm going to get it. It looks yummy. Coffee and pastry are great together."

Suzy headed for the counter, bought the pastry, and began munching on it while I resumed our conversation: "Here's what a friend of mine suggests for my rabbit problem. Whenever you have your hair cut, you should ask for the clippings and then spread them around the bed of the begonias. Supposedly, this keeps the varmints away. Sounds a little creepy to me. Like a CSI episode for furry critters...Okay, you're not laughing. What is up with you?"

"I just ate that apple fritter."

"I know. I was sitting right here, remember? I witnessed the crime."

"It's not funny. I do this all the time. I eat when I'm not hungry, and that makes me crazy."

"Well, then, stop it."

"If I could stop, don't you think I would have by now?"

"I suppose so. I'm sorry. I didn't mean to be insensitive."

"It's like I don't have control over this and then I end up gaining five pounds. It is depressing. I'm caught in this vicious cycle. I try to resist but have no willpower. Then I feel bad and could kick myself. So I try to be good, but then a pastry starts calling my name. And you know me. If it's calling my name, I'm going to answer!"

"Do you have to answer by eating it?"

"Yes. Otherwise, it wouldn't be a problem, right?"

"Wrong. Anytime you think there is only one choice, you create a problem. There are other ways to handle this. You have more control than you think you do. Look, I saw that apple fritter, too. It looked delicious and I thought about how great it would taste with my coffee. I wanted it just as badly as you did. But I've learned a little secret that really helps me when it comes to eating. I've learned to press pause."

"Press pause? What are you talking about?"

"I've learned to press a mental pause button and become more aware of my eating. Basically, I've learned to be more intentional with my eating. It doesn't mean I am perfect when it comes to food, but it sure has made a difference."

Press pause is more than a strategy. It is a mindset that has been the foundation of my work with clients in therapy and clinical practice for more than twenty-five years. As an eating disorders specialist employed by medical schools, hospital programs, public schools, universities, and private practices, I have used this technique to help people from all walks of life who struggle with food and eating.

My professional life has focused on developing strategies that work when it comes to food and living a healthy lifestyle. During the past six years, I have had the privilege to talk to an even larger audience through speaking, writing, and appearing as Dr. Linda on ABC Family's Living the Life television show. I often remind our viewers that you don't need to be in therapy to have issues with food!

In fact, have you ever said to yourself, Why did I just eat that? I wasn't hungry. I can't believe I just ate that? This book is for you and the rest of us who eat when we aren't hungry, eat without thinking, or overeat when we are full, then find ourselves saying, I hate myself right now. What is wrong with me?

Once we eat to our own regret, then our sense of defeat only leads to more overeating. What a vicious cycle! We don't want to overeat but do. Then we feel terrible, make self-disparaging remarks or excuse our behavior, feel even worse, and overeat more. We give up and give in. We tell ourselves that the food is more powerful than we are and that we can't defeat this inner urge or impulse. We are left feeling hopeless.

And statistics seem to bear us out. Despite the billions of dollars spent on diets and fitness products, Americans experience record rates of obesity and remain extremely weight conscious. According to a study in The New England Journal of Medicine, 90 to 95 percent of people who diet are unsuccessful in the long term1 — and other studies indicate that most of those dieters regain their lost weight within one to five years!2 These are not encouraging statistics — just thinking about them makes you want to grab the hot buttered popcorn.

To make matters worse, after we eat something we don't really want or need, we don't usually tell ourselves to let it go and move on. Instead, we give in to the hopelessness of the moment. What we need to do is learn from the moment: think about why we just did what we didn't want to do and focus our efforts on changing this practiced habit rather than simply feeling bad about it or excusing it.

Let's be honest. We know the facts about food. I mean, look around you. We are saturated with information. We are bombarded by diet and fitness trivia. You can hardly pick up a magazine without finding recipes or reading about a new ab reducer. Truth is, these days you don't have to be a registered dietitian to make good food decisions!

Most overeating or unhealthy eating is not cured by more seminars on what to eat, another new and improved diet, or more creative exercise ideas. The problem most of us have is that we don't do what we know is good to do! What we need to focus on is Why? What is missing? Why do we eat when we aren't hungry?

Our lives are busy. Food is always available and oftentimes we eat without thinking. We need to press pause. Our goal is to feel in control of the food we choose to eat, rather than the food controlling us.

We want eating to be an intentional behavior under our control. Wouldn't it feel great to be in control of the apple fritter rather than have the apple fritter controlling you? Wouldn't you like to look at a yummy pastry and make an intentional decision whether you are going to eat it or not? Or if you do choose to eat it, to not feel guilty afterward? It can be done!

To get there, we must understand that eating is more than a physical act that satisfies hunger. It is emotional, relational, environmental, and spiritual. We eat when we are hurried, stressed, and feeling all kinds of emotions: happy, sad, fearful, and more. Eating can distract us from uncomfortable feelings or connect us to memories of love. Food comforts us when we are lonely or rejected. It distracts us when we are angry and calms us when we feel stressed.

We eat when we fight with our spouse, feel sexually insecure, are stressed by the demands of elderly parents, try unsuccessfully to comfort a screaming toddler, are frustrated with work, and so on. Food gives us pleasure and a momentary break.

We eat because we can. Walking past the smoothie bar and seeing those machines foam up tropical concoctions moves us toward the counter. A cold winter night is warmed by a hot cup of peppermint mocha. The television advertisement of chocolate topping on rich vanilla ice cream is virtually telling us to march to the freezer. Our environment provides ample opportunities and cues to eat and provides inviting choices. We respond.

And finally, we eat to satisfy a spiritual hunger that can't be satisfied with food. There is a natural emptiness in all of us, a longing for something beyond ourselves that can't be met through the natural appetite — but hey, that doesn't stop us from trying! Even though in the long run, food doesn't satisfy those empty places or work to calm us down, sometimes it seems to fill emotional and spiritual emptiness. It provides a stop gap, but a very short one, and in its wake leaves us with guilt, pounds, and poor health.

Understanding that there are so many possible triggers to eating when we are not hungry, we now recognize that examining why we eat is essential for life success. What are the triggers and how can we react in new ways? Unless we become aware of why we eat and learn to press pause before putting food in our mouth, eating will continue to serve unintended purposes and weight-loss efforts will fail. But most important, the enjoyment of eating will be gone forever!

Food gives life. Somehow we've lost that perspective. Food has become our enemy. We obsess, overindulge, and wish we could just eat without giving so much thought to it. But we can't. Thinking about why we eat will help us. We have to become aware of what we are doing, take a deep breath, and make changes.

The purpose of this book is to help you rethink your relationship to food. My hope is that you will enjoy eating and learn to use food in positive, life-sustaining ways. To do so, you need to press pause, to take a moment and think about the meaning we've given food in our lives. If we are to change our negative relationship with food to a healthy one, we must become aware of how we think about food and use it in everyday life.

So what do we do? What is the cure for hurried and unintentional eating? How do we shift our thinking? It is not as difficult as you think, but does require honesty and press pause moments. We must be truthful to ourselves and develop an awareness of why we eat. Once we know ourselves better, we can consider our options, decide to make changes, and take action.

Think about anything you own that uses a remote control. One of the beautiful things about a remote is that it has a button on it marked pause, which allows you to stop the movie or TiVo. With the pause button, you have control and choice. You decide what to watch or what you will do next. The pause button allows you a moment to reflect, to not react impulsively, and to determine your next move. This is what we need to do when it comes to food: press a mental pause button that allows us to be more intentional about our next move. It just takes a moment.

This book will show you how to use that pause button: how to press pause before you eat, to be in control and develop a thoughtful approach to eating, and to think more about what you do and why you do it.

Our moment-by-moment choices determine our future. We need to make changes that lead to happiness and health.

The basic Press Pause Principle is this:

Purpose in your heart to pause.

Attend to the moment.

Understand why and what you do.

Strategize ways to make changes.

Execute new ways to think, feel, and act.

Each chapter will walk you through the process of being intentional. You will learn to press pause, take a deep breath, reflect for a moment, and choose your direction. That's the pattern to develop in order to change your relationship with food. And it takes only a moment — a pause. Because we are body, soul, and spirit, this book will address all three aspects of our being. Our bodies are greatly affected by our eating habits, but so are our soul and spirit. Consequently, we will learn how to engage all three aspects of our being when it comes to food and eating.

At the end of each chapter, you will find a variation of the Press Pause Principle that relates to the theme of that chapter. Each of these principles is part of an overall plan to develop a healthy lifelong positive relationship with food and eating. Pressing pause is the key to intentional eating. It requires only a moment but greatly affects our lives.

The Press Pause Principle will help you remember how to make small but important changes. It is a summary of the information presented in each chapter and a reminder of how to approach food and eating with intention.

As we learn to recognize our eating triggers and understand why they are so powerful in our lives, eating takes on new meaning. It becomes enjoyable, not filled with guilt and angst. Most of us have lost the joy of eating and need to find it once again or maybe experience it for the first time. Whether you are underweight, overweight, or at your ideal weight, learn to look beyond what you eat, to why you eat. Press pause and choose the path to success.

Pause for Wisdom
Eat your food with gladness,
and drink...with a joyful heart.

Ecclesiastes 9:7 © 2009 Linda Mintle

Table of Contents

Part 1 Purpose

1 Press Pause: It Takes Only a Moment 3

2 Hurry Up to Slow Down 10

3 Listen to Your Body Talk 26

4 From Impulsive to Thoughtful 43

Part 2 Attend

5 The Many Meanings of Food 59

6 Relax and Put Down the Fork 75

7 Look Around: Hidden Cues That Make Us Eat 96

8 Food, Marriage, and Family 107

Part 3 Understand

9 Feasting on Emotions 121

10 The Power of Food Thoughts 142

11 Spiritual Hunger Requires Spiritual Food 163

Part 4 Strategize

12 Tackle Your Emotions 177

13 Renew Your Mind 200

14 Eating with People, Not Because of Them 212

Part 5 Execute

15 Press Pause as a Lifetime Practice 229

Acknowledgments 233

Notes 235

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher

"Press Pause Before You Eat brings Linda's fresh, funny, biblical perspective to challenges we all face concerning what we eat. This book will challenge and encourage you while letting you know you're not alone in your daily struggle with a fast-paced world and food." — Joyce Meyer, Bible teacher and bestselling author

"After every late-night bowl of ice cream or every second or third chocolate chip cookie, I find myself lamenting, "Why did I eat that? I wasn't even hungry!" Dr. Linda helps us examine why we continually sabotage our own good intentions in her new book, Press Pause Before You Eat!" — Terry Meeuwsen, cohost of The 700 Club

Reading Group Guide

Dr. Linda Mintle, Ph.D

the Author



Known for her humor and practical advice, Dr. Linda will motivate you towards positive life change. A national expert on marriage, family and eating issues, her no-nonsense approach to everyday life and conversational style will inspire and uplift. For over 20 years, Dr. Linda has been in clinical practice as a licensed therapist, having worked in a variety of settings that have earned her several distinctions.

Dr. Mintle has authored 13 books: Raising Healthy Kids, winner of the 2009 Mom’s Choice Award, selected as book of the week by Dr. Laura and written for parents as a prevention to child obesity and overweight problems; I Married You, Not Your Family, a book aimed at strengthening marriage and preventing divorce endorsed by Dr. Laura; Making Peace with Your Thighs, a book aimed at helping women get off the scales and on with their lives; Lose it for Life, a bestseller co-authored with Stephen Arterburn that presents a total plan for losing weight and keeping it off; A Daughter’s Journey Home: Finding a way to love, honor and connect with your mother, a book designed to help mothers and daughters develop more intimate connections; Breaking Free, a six booklet series covering the topics of depression, anger and unforgiveness, negative self-image, stress, anorexia and bulimia, and compulsive overeating; Getting Unstuck, a book that addresses the top three mental health issues for women; and Kids Killing Kids, a teen violence prevention book. Her newest release, Press Pause Before You Eat, a book that celebrates joyful eating and says goodbye to mindless eating, will be available Spring 2009.

Married for 34 years and the mother of two teenagers, Dr. Linda currently resides in Virginia.





Dr. Linda Mintle, Ph.D

the Book



Why did you write PRESS PAUSE …Before you eat?

I wrote this book to change our relationship with food, to make eating something we enjoy, and not something we do as we rush through our busy lives. Cultivating a life of mindfulness involves regulating what goes in your mouth for the right reasons. The concept of PRESS PAUSE is important to modern living. All of us need to slow down and think more about what we do and why we do it, especially when it comes to eating. Eating should be enjoyed, not a source of guilt or coping.





When did you first become interested in working with food and eating issues as a licensed therapist?

About 30 years ago, I helped develop one of the first eating disorders programs in the medical school in which I was on faculty. Our patients were mostly women who struggled with anorexia and bulimia. Over the years, more and more patients were coming to the institute for help with obesity and overeating. I began expanding my practice to include compulsive overeating and the psychological side of dealing with obesity and weight loss.





Why do so many of us have difficulty delaying gratification?

We live in a culture that reinforces impulsive behavior and does not teach self-control. Look around. We spend money we don’t have, make decisions we regret, act out sexually and basically do what feels good for the moment without much thought to the long term consequences. Eating is no exception. The mistake is thinking that the answer to all this abundance and availability is will power. Will power doesn’t win the impulsive battle. We need spiritual help here. Controlling our appetites requires more than human strength. It requires partnering with God and allowing His Spirit to empower us to make good choices.





You have a story in the book about a woman who used food to try and satisfy spiritual hunger. Do we often confuse the desire for food with spiritual emptiness?

Yes. We have an appetite for spiritual things that is often denied. There is a part of us that longs to be connected to something bigger than ourselves. This spiritual hunger can’t be met through eating. Apart from God, we are restless. We were created to be satisfied by God. Until we develop an intimate relationship with Him, that spiritual hunger will persist.





Dr. Linda Mintle, Ph.D

the Conversation



DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:



1. When we are too busy to think about how and why we eat, we eat mindlessly. Learning to PAUSE and slow down is an important part of eating better and with intention. Based on the information and suggestions in the book, what specific steps can you take to stop being so busy and take better care of yourself?

2. Review the signs of physical hunger. Each time you want to eat, go over those signs and decide if you are really hungry. If not, identify the cue or trigger that is prompting you to eat. For example, is it stress, an environmental cue, an emotion, a relationship issue, etc. Keep the diary suggested in Chapters 5 and 8. Track your patterns of unintentional eating and notice what triggers you the most to eat when not hungry. Share with the group which type of cues trigger you the most?

3. Think about the meaning of food in your life. How does your cultural background influence your thoughts about food and eating? How does your family and prior experiences with food play into how you use food today? Do you use food as reward, love and ascribe other meanings? Discuss these meanings in the group.

4. On a piece of paper, jot down the foods you tend to eat when you feel stressed? Now, come up with strategies to de-stress yourself without using food. Make a list of things you can do when stress begins to mount in your life. Try substituting those things the next time you feel the urge to eat when stressed. Share your successes with the group.

5. Look at your eating area in your house, condo or apartment. Does it look relaxing, inviting and do you even use it? Review all the environmental cues in Chapter 6 that make us overeat and check those against your own eating environment. What physical changes can you make to improve your eating area? Do you also need to commit to eating in that space and take more time with each meal? Finally, count the number of family meals eaten at the table. What can you do to increase that number given all the benefits of families eating together? Have the group discuss the changes they made.

6. Evaluate the important relationships in your life. Are they meeting your expectations? Are your expectations realistic? Do you feel your intimacy needs are being met? Include your relationship with God in this evaluation. Now, think about the times you may eat when upset or disappointed in these relationships? What can do you to resolve these issues other than use food to cope with negative feelings? Identify the relationships that lead you to eat without thinking? How often do you use prayer and time with God when you feel let down in relationships?

7. It is so difficult to make time to be quiet. Yet, the Bible talks about the need for a pause to refresh our spirits. Look up these scriptures: Psalm 131:2; Pslam 130:5-6; Isaiah 30:15, 18; Psalm 40:1-3; Psalm 51:16. Read these scriptures and discuss the importance of waiting on the Lord.

8. This week, notice a time in which you are having food thoughts when you aren’t hungry. Practice the skill of not resisting those thoughts but allowing them to come and go. Notice what happens to those thoughts. Write down your observations. Did this work better than trying to resist those thoughts? Did the craving pass? Practice this several times in the next week and report to the group on your experiences.

9. Take a few moments and examine your spiritual life. Do you practice spiritual disciplines or have you become complacent when it comes to spending time reading your Bible and sitting quietly before the Lord in prayer? If so, commit to those disciplines once again or perhaps for the first time. As you become more intimate with God, what do you notice about food cravings and mindless eating?

10. Eating in response to emotions is perhaps one of the most common things people do. Using the PRESS PAUSE principle, look at the chapter on regulating and tolerating emotions (Chapter 12) and come up with emotional rescues that would work. Decide which lifestyle changes you need to make and choose one to begin the process. Report on how it worked at the next study group.


11. Renewing the mind is a biblical concept that requires us to continually put on the mind of Christ. What can you do on a daily basis to fill your mind with truth and God’s thought? Identify ways that will keep you operating in truth and empower your spirit with the fullness of God.

12. The final chapter in the book focuses on how to execute intentional eating. Evaluate each of the ten guidelines in terms of your own issues with food. Which of these will be the most difficult? Which of these is already a part of you? What can you do to keep these guidelines in place and develop a positive, healthy relationship with food? Discuss these in the group.

Introduction

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS:

1. When we are too busy to think about how and why we eat, we eat mindlessly. Learning to PAUSE and slow down is an important part of eating better and with intention. Based on the information and suggestions in the book, what specific steps can you take to stop being so busy and take better care of yourself?

2. Review the signs of physical hunger. Each time you want to eat, go over those signs and decide if you are really hungry. If not, identify the cue or trigger that is prompting you to eat. For example, is it stress, an environmental cue, an emotion, a relationship issue, etc. Keep the diary suggested in Chapters 5 and 8. Track your patterns of unintentional eating and notice what triggers you the most to eat when not hungry. Share with the group which type of cues trigger you the most?

3. Think about the meaning of food in your life. How does your cultural background influence your thoughts about food and eating? How does your family and prior experiences with food play into how you use food today? Do you use food as reward, love and ascribe other meanings? Discuss these meanings in the group.

4. On a piece of paper, jot down the foods you tend to eat when you feel stressed? Now, come up with strategies to de-stress yourself without using food. Make a list of things you can do when stress begins to mount in your life. Try substituting those things the next time you feel the urge to eat when stressed. Share your successes with the group.

5. Look at your eating area in your house, condo or apartment. Does it look relaxing, inviting and do you even use it? Review all the environmental cues in Chapter 6 that make us overeat and checkthose against your own eating environment. What physical changes can you make to improve your eating area? Do you also need to commit to eating in that space and take more time with each meal? Finally, count the number of family meals eaten at the table. What can you do to increase that number given all the benefits of families eating together? Have the group discuss the changes they made.

6. Evaluate the important relationships in your life. Are they meeting your expectations? Are your expectations realistic? Do you feel your intimacy needs are being met? Include your relationship with God in this evaluation. Now, think about the times you may eat when upset or disappointed in these relationships? What can do you to resolve these issues other than use food to cope with negative feelings? Identify the relationships that lead you to eat without thinking? How often do you use prayer and time with God when you feel let down in relationships?

7. It is so difficult to make time to be quiet. Yet, the Bible talks about the need for a pause to refresh our spirits. Look up these scriptures: Psalm 131:2; Pslam 130:5-6; Isaiah 30:15, 18; Psalm 40:1-3; Psalm 51:16. Read these scriptures and discuss the importance of waiting on the Lord.

8. This week, notice a time in which you are having food thoughts when you aren't hungry. Practice the skill of not resisting those thoughts but allowing them to come and go. Notice what happens to those thoughts. Write down your observations. Did this work better than trying to resist those thoughts? Did the craving pass? Practice this several times in the next week and report to the group on your experiences.

9. Take a few moments and examine your spiritual life. Do you practice spiritual disciplines or have you become complacent when it comes to spending time reading your Bible and sitting quietly before the Lord in prayer? If so, commit to those disciplines once again or perhaps for the first time. As you become more intimate with God, what do you notice about food cravings and mindless eating?

10. Eating in response to emotions is perhaps one of the most common things people do. Using the PRESS PAUSE principle, look at the chapter on regulating and tolerating emotions (Chapter 12) and come up with emotional rescues that would work. Decide which lifestyle changes you need to make and choose one to begin the process. Report on how it worked at the next study group.

11. Renewing the mind is a biblical concept that requires us to continually put on the mind of Christ. What can you do on a daily basis to fill your mind with truth and God's thought? Identify ways that will keep you operating in truth and empower your spirit with the fullness of God.

12. The final chapter in the book focuses on how to execute intentional eating. Evaluate each of the ten guidelines in terms of your own issues with food. Which of these will be the most difficult? Which of these is already a part of you? What can you do to keep these guidelines in place and develop a positive, healthy relationship with food? Discuss these in the group.

Dr. Linda Mintle is a licensed therapist and approved supervisor for the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, a diplomat in social work, an assistant professor of clinical pediatrics, Department of Pediatrics, at Eastern Virginia Medical School, appears regularly on several national television and radio shows, and is a news consultant and contributor for Newswatch. She received her PhD in Urban Health and Clinical Psychology from Old Dominion University and is a national speaker and bestselling author of fifteen books. Known for her humor and practical advice, Dr. Linda will motivate you to positive life change. For more help and/or information regarding Dr. Linda, visit her Web site at www.drlindahelps.com.

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Press Pause Before You Eat: Say Good-bye to Mindless Eating and Hello to the Joys of Eating 3.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
ButterflyEmerge More than 1 year ago
Wonderful read! Many facts that I'd not pondered, didn't know, or had never put together. Helpful information to help me say "No" when I really want to say "Yes" to food. When I put the book down, I've learned something else new about my body ... and I thought I knew so much about it already! Such a learned read!
BevE More than 1 year ago
This is one diet book that is worth looking into. Dr. Mintle tackles the issue of mindless eating which is a big part of what is wrong with our eating habits. With food on every corner, endless commercials and lots of salt, sugar and fat added to the fast foods we eat, we need every strategy possible to help us fight against impulsive eating. PAUSE is an acronym to help us take 'pause' and think before we eat. It takes patience and time but the lifestyle changes that can be made using Dr. Mintle's book will give you the tools to change your diet and will ultimately change the way you look and feel.
vetters on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is largely fluff. The nuggets of sound advice provided would have worked better in a pamphlet rather than in a 250 page book. The book's description says nothing about its religious overtones, yet its target reader is clearly a devout Christian who isn't bothered by reading pages of (pretty pointless and/or repetitive) vignettes and generalities. This got on my nerves and made me more cynical about the book in general. Looking back at the book to writer this review, I would advise skimming it in small doses rather than sitting down to read it all at once.That said, I found "How to Combat Stress Eating" on page 93 useful. For the quickest secular support in learning how to control your eating habits, turn to the last three pages for the 12 practical "study questions" that should help you "press pause before you eat." Well, except numbers 6, 7, 9, and 11, which all focus on your relationship with God and reading passages from the Bible.
Elysabeth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The concept of 'mindfulness' can be applied to eating, and all of life - well-articulated here, I found this book speaks relevantly to those who eat out of boredom, habit, or compulsion. Mindfully setting one's intention prior to eating will return the relationship one has with food back into one of nourishment. Recommended.
skinglist on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
An interesting mix of advice, scientific research and anecdotes make this a very readable book. In addition, the pace of the book was good and it followed a logical progression that seemed to cover a range of topics that lead the reader to (over) eat. I also liked the "thoughts to watch out for" which made it more readable and gave the reader something to look for. That said, I ffound it to be condescending at times and made assumptions that may or may not be true of most readers. I did not find the Chirstian aspects of this book to be offensive or overbearing, though I am not religious myself. It might have made me pause before selecting this to read had I known of the author's leanings. I might recommend this to other readers but I'm not sure it's the most relevant on the topic
iamalibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Press Pause Before You Eat by Dr. Linda Mintle is filled with stories of emotions and events that define our relationships with food. This book has a very impressive suggestions on how to control how we eat, why we eat and what patterns in life have lead to this behavior. Dr. Mintel takes a psychological approach and applies a spiritual aspect to help control eating patterns. This book has great tips, although it provide them with a Christian perspective which could be a turn-off to those of other faiths.
asbooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is more of a psychology or therapy book than a book about food. I realize the doctor is trying to show the relationship we have to our food and how to change it for the better but it felt way too preachy too me. It's riddled with religious overtones which I wasn't expecting.I believe we should all examine our relationship to food especially if we are overweight but I disagree that turning to the bible or prayer is the answer for me personally.If you are a god fearing christian looking to go into therapy about your over indulgence of deserts and aren't aware of why you over eat... then this book may help you out. Me, I think I'll pass.
bruce_krafft on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is like all those great magizine articles that you have read in one book. Anytime you need a little help, its right there, waiting for you to read it agian, becuase really who reads something like this once and then changes that way that they live their life? You need to keep going back and revisiting it to really change habits of a lifetime.We are all different, gaining and losing weight for different reasons. What works for one person doesn't work for another. This isan't really about what you eat, but thinking about what you eat and stategies that you can try. PAUSE = Purpose -Attend-Understand-Strategize-Execute. And this principle can be applied to many other areas of your life. If you have issues with weight, I recommond taking a look at this book.
Agape on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As a physician, I am often critical about the way authors use research and sources and their conclusions. Dr. Linda Mintle is very fair in her assertions and gives enough data so it can be looked up, if desired. The book covers the whole range of eating, but is focused on people who are overweight or have eating problems. But even if you don't have those problems, there is a lot of good information about eating.
sumik on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really liked the concept of this book. And I liked what I read of it. And like so many diet changes I try to make I FULLY intended to read and try the things that she was saying. What I really like is the idea that she is trying to change the way you think about what and why you eat -and I know that when I attempt to be really aware of what and why I eat I generally eat better. I'm not sure what it's going to take to get me to that place where I try to make real changes but obviously I am not there yet because I haven't followed through. I do think that the idea is good and would recommend it to anyone trying to find a way to handle the mental aspects of eating for the wrong reasons.
she_climber on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I'm not sure why authors/publishers feel the need to downplay the fact that a book has Christian theme. My first clue should have been the author reviews on the back from a "Bible Teacher" and "Cohost of The 700 Club", but I moved forward regardless. The author covers no real new ground on the issue of why we overeat and the tried and true tips (at least in theory) of how to overcome the problem that can be find in numerous other books . That is until she brings in her secret weapon: God. The tag line of this book reads "The Secret to a New Relationship with Food", well, SPOILER ALERT - the secret is your relationship with God. We have no willpower (ie free will) but apparently God can lead us from the tempation of that cookie. This book was a turn off for me, but very well may float someone else's boat.
mmhorman on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I will begin by saying that Dr. Mintle is a well known author of Christian self help books. I did not know this before reading the book and mention it only because this book will not speak as well to a non-Christian audience. Indeed many Librarything reviewers were suspicious of this book because it was Christian.That being said, the topic of this book (mindless eating) is a timely one which affects so many of us. Her book is very conversational and includes many anecdotes from her personal life and from the lives of her friends and the patients she encountered in her years as an eating disorders specialist. Dr. Mintle is very knowledgeable and her suggestions are very sound. Her book was very easy to read because of her conversational tone. I have struggled a lot myself with mindless and emotional eating and I definitely recognized myself in many of her stories. I also learned some tricks that might help me in my own struggles with weight. I also found her use of scripture to be very insightful and inspiring and not at all heavy handed.I would recommend this book to anyone who wants a Christian perspective on overcoming struggles with emotional and mindless overeating.
justmeRosalie on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rather than giving heavy hardbound advice about losing weight, Dr. Linda Mintle has lightened up the approach to dieting counsel. By acknowledging that the reader has a brain and has probably already heard most of the latest hype a dozen times, she doesn't elaborate much on all the obvious approaches. At first this leaves the text wanting to be a bit more meaty...pardon the pun. However the consistent use of "press pause..." throughtout gets into your thinking and, i found myself actually doing a lot of that after reading just 1/3 or so of the book. When I was thinking of eating, questions actually came into my mind wondering why I wanted to eat, and for what benefit. Quite an accomplisment and probably moreso than most other writings have offered. I came to appreciate that by being guided through the problems of overeating with helpful suggestions, the reader is, in the finality of it all, given credit for being able to figure the details out for her/himself, What he needs, is spiritual or emotional help to succeed. It seems a habit is formed as you read that is a kind of side affect, that being that you pause before you chow down and think about why you will be doing that, and consider if there is a nonfood alternative. The text and encouragement becomes supplemental in its support, accomplishing the goal of the book.So although the book seemed a bit fragmented at first and not deep enough for my tastes, I think it has turned out to be one of the few that is actually effective. The ideas gleaned won't just disappear after it's finished and set down.
pando19 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
We've all interrupted something we were listening to by pressing the pause button. Linda Mintle takes this common action and applies it to our relationship with food. By pressing the mental pause button, you can say goodbye to the habit of eating without thinking.Dr. Mintle offers five important steps to take to implement what she calls "the pause principle:"Purpose -- setting your intention;Attend -- establishing your awareness and sharpening your focus on your behavior;Understand -- learning what food and feeding every part of your life is really all about;Strategize -- building new behaviors consistent with your purpose; andExecute - putting it all together to practice what you've created.The content of this book is nothing new - you've heard it all before in bits and pieces. What is revolutionary is how she structures this content in easy-to-understand, easy-to-apply layers that you will immediately grasp and remember. And her "pause principle" doesn't have to stop with your relationship with food. It's clear that it can be applied to all areas of your life.If you're looking for yet another diet book, keep looking. There are plenty to be found, but the fact that there are so many points to the more important fact that the diet itself is not where the problem lies. Mintle's volume can help you identify and repair that problem.Press Pause before You Eat is a well-written book with significant help for those of us who do things mindlessly - and isn't that just about everyone?Highly recommended!
06nwingert on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Overall, I enjoyed Press Pause Before You Eat. It was written in a simple, easy to understand manner and is similar to Eat This, Not That . The author gives really simple nutritional information such as eat 5 or 6 smaller, healthier meals a day, rather than 3 larger, unhealthier ones; and make smart choices. However, what I didn't like about the book (this is why it received a low rating) were the Christianity references sprinkled throughout the book. At times, I didn't know whether I was reading a book on religion or on nutrition. The god references were completely unnecessary and took the book off topic. They could have (and should have) been cut and the book would still be coherent. Since science and religion normally don't go hand-in-hand, the religious references seemed to make the author less credible.
Tocar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Down to Earth advice on how to manage your eating with insights on why and how one eats. Each chapter ends with something new to reflect on using the acronym PAUSE, a main them of of this book which impels the reader to reflect on their own choices. Even thought the author uses religious quotes and alludes to the christian god, it is otherwise useful.
nmulvany on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Linda Mintle¿s book, Press Pause Before You Eat, outlines the many factors that encourage mindless and unintentional eating that can cause weight problems and an unhealthy relationship with food. This is definitely not a ¿diet book.¿ There are no prescriptions for ¿eat this, not that.¿ Instead Mintle encourages readers to think about eating in a mindful and intentional manner.The book is well written with interesting stories. There are ten pages of endnotes that are culled from a wide variety of sources. The book includes sidebars that offer informative tangents. There is no index.Although Mintle breaks no new ground, this would be a good introduction to mindful eating for readers new to this subject. One annoying drawback to the book is the interjection of Christian ¿tidbits¿ - God makes his first appearance on page 15 and pops up frequently again and again, there are bible quotes (both Old and New Testaments), and quotes from Christian saints and commentators. While spirituality is often related to mindfulness, non-Christians may be put off by this aspect of the book.
travelinlibrarian on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I received this book as part of the early reviewers program and did not realize that the publisher was of a definite Christian persuasion. While the author does offer some good advice the references to God and the quotes from the bible sprinkled throughout the text was a total turn off for me. If that's your thing this book might be good for you. If not, try reading "In Defense of Food" instead. (In fact, read it anyway.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just passing through~marissa
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Srry bro. I was nvr going out with u. My sister took my nook and was posting as me. I was dating jon and my sis just kinda messed that up...