The Outlaw Album: Stories

The Outlaw Album: Stories

by Daniel Woodrell

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Overview

Twelve timeless Ozarkian tales of those on the fringes of society, by a "stunningly original" (Associated Press) American master.

Daniel Woodrell is able to lend uncanny logic to harsh, even criminal behavior in this wrenching collection of stories. Desperation-both material and psychological—motivates his characters. A husband cruelly avenges the killing of his wife's pet; an injured rapist is cared for by a young girl, until she reaches her breaking point; a disturbed veteran of Iraq is murdered for his erratic behavior; an outsider's house is set on fire by an angry neighbor.

There is also the tenderness and loyalty of the vulnerable in these stories—between spouses, parents and children, siblings, and comrades in arms-which brings the troubled, sorely tested cast of characters to vivid, relatable life. And, as ever, "the music coming from Woodrell's banjo cannot be confused with the sounds of any other writer" (Donald Harington, Atlanta Journal Constitution).

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316019002
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 10/09/2012
Pages: 167
Product dimensions: 5.64(w) x 8.02(h) x 0.59(d)

About the Author

Five of Daniel Woodrell's eight published novels were selected as New York Times Notable Books of the Year. Tomato Red won the PEN West Award for the Novel in 1999. Woodrell lives in the Ozarks near the Arkansas line with his wife, Katie Estill.

Customer Reviews

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Outlaw Album 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
BookishDame on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Ozark deep woods stories that will both shock and amaze you with the intelligence and depth of Daniel Woodrell's writing. These stories are not to be missed! The are as gritty and raw as the Appalachia stories you may have heard of...only they're better. Woodrell has won too many awards to list for his writing abilities, but you'll know him best for his book to movie, "Winter's Bone," which won Academy Awards last year.I highly recommend this small book. It's reminiscent of Falkner at his best.
Allizabeth on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Description: The Outlaw Album by Daniel Woodrell is a set of 12 short stories describing "those on the fringes of society". These include a man who seeks revenge for the murder of his wife's dog; a girl who makes her rapist uncle pay for his sins, and a jealousy that could be deadly to a hitchhiker. Review: Being a fan of the film version of Daniel Woodrell's Winter's Bone, I had a feeling I would enjoy a set of his "backwoods" short stories. Each of the twelve stories was chillingly realistic and gritty. I love the detail and the dialogue, especially in the most twisted tales, like in The Echo of Neighborly Bones. I also really like the cover art, it adds to the overall dark, twisted, and broken feel of the stories. My only complaint was that there weren't more stories since they were all between 7 and 28 pages each. I would recommend The Outlaw Album to anyone in the mood for some seriously unsettling and eerie stories of the "invisible" outlaws.Rating: On the Run (4.5/5)***I received this book from Little, Brown and Company (Hachette Book Group) in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.
tloeffler on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is Daniel Woodrell's first collection of stories. As he does with his novels, he portrays the seedier side of Missouri Ozarks life, but in shorter segments, and he makes bad behavior almost justifiable . The short story format allows him to tell his stories from varying viewpoints, and he is definitely a storyteller. Each story has its own flavor and style, and you can hear his writing as you read. As he does in his novels, he doesn't always tell you what happens as much as he sets the stage and lets you figure it out on your own. An amazing offering from an amazing writer.
eenerd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Interesting mix of short stories, based in various parts of Appalachia. Covers many topics, but mostly examines relationships between people, whether family or not. Some of the stories really shine, like the first one about a man who kills his neighbor over and over again in response to his wife's grief. Really amazing, really beautiful story and writing. There are several stories like that, but there are a few that are super-literary, which I found very difficult to get through--they were just way too abstract for my taste. The goods even out the bads here, for certain, which is one of the things I love about short story collections.
MarcusH on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This review is originally posted on LuxuryReading.com:Daniel Woodrell¿s The Outlaw Album is a collection of 12 short stories that offer a desolate investigation of individuals residing on society¿s fringe. Woodrell¿s tales explore themes centered on abuse, trauma, and the inability to outrun one¿s past. The characters throughout do not represent feel good heroes or heroines, but those who struggle to cope with what their environment has provided for them. Throughout the collection Woodrell focuses on the grittiness of society. He explores many themes, which include the consequences of war, both past and present; and the effects of sexual abuse, poverty, and traumatic loss.Woodrell makes no apologies for the actions of his characters. In ¿Uncle,¿ one of the more gritty and unrepentant stories in the collection, a young girl grows tired of her uncle¿s sexual abuse. After being raped and witnessing other rapes performed by her uncle, the young girl violently and unremorsefully paralyzes the man with a pickaxe. She is then forced by her mother to tend to him. She embarks on a mission to make him suffer for his transgressions until eventually taking steps to enact her final revenge upon him.Another pinnacle from the collection includes ¿Night Stand.¿ The story investigates the psychological damage both past and current wars create, as a young war veteran breaks into the home of a veteran from a past war. The story centers around the lack of understanding civilians have for soldiers either returning from war or those dealing with the trauma from past conflicts.Woodrell does an amazing job of maintaining a connection to society¿s dark and actively dismissed dilemmas. At points, however, his writing style slows to a painful crawl and becomes experimental and distracting. ¿The Horse in Our History¿ employs a writing style that at one moment relies on first hand oral transcriptions of an event and first person narration that tries to connect the past to the present. While interesting, the stylistic choice breaks the momentum created throughout the preceding stories and may distract the reader from noticing the story¿s connection to the collection¿s overall theme. While all of the stories investigate a gritty truthfulness that we all would like to hide from, Woodrell¿s meticulous attention to the psychology of his characters and their surrounding environment makes for a culturally significant addition to our literary heritage.
Hagelstein on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
There¿s a depth and complexity to Daniel Woodrell¿s stories that few writers can approach. If the goal of a short story is to pack as much perfection as possible into a small space, Woodrell comes close more often than not. Plot, character, motivation and place are layered, intertwined and caressed to create truly original stories. Desperation is the common theme. A young soldier damaged by Iraq and the suicide of his father may choose to return rather than accept his options at home. A girl cares for the ¿joyful and mean¿ uncle that she turned physically helpless ¿ the uncle that raped her. A father loves his thieving son ¿like the way I love the Korean conflict. Something terrible I have lived through.¿ The carnage of the civil war -with former neighbors slaughtering one another - is explored. Woodrell¿s writing is brutally unique. A man describes the houses in his neighborhood as ¿the kind that if they were people they would cough a lot and spit up tangled stuff.¿ A man who¿s had just about enough of another: ¿My arms ached already from the thought of digging his new home, for I was thinking he would soon be in it.¿
kraaivrouw on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Daniel Woodrell became one of my favorite writers when I discovered Winter's Bone, a book that has a place in my top 10 favorite books. His stories are sly, brutally honest, removed from redneck stereotype - firmly rooted in a particular kind of reality. He also writes beautifully. Winter's Bone is a book that made me ache the first time I read and did so again after I finished it and read it all over a second time.The Outlaw Album is a book of short stories - capsulized moments of revenge, of what can happen when people are pushed to the edge. It is strongly of its place - one that I know well from the time I spent living in Arkansas. I spent a summer in college going out on the Little Rock library's bookmobile. Twice a week we sat in the big bookmobile in a suburban parking with lots of choice and air conditioning. The other two days we took the smaller bookmobile and drove back roads up into the Ouachita mountains - no air conditioning, but breathtaking beauty and patrons who brought us food from their gardens and homemade sausages. I can remember riding those roads through the woods with trees that formed a canopy over the road and wild roses growing in the trees that colored them all like a young girl's blush.Daniel Woodrell gets the place and the people and its stories. His voice reminds me most of singers like Meredith Sisco or Levon Helm or early early Loretta Lynn or any of the people I've heard singing Appalachin folk songs and hymns at tent revivals, church, and bluegrass gatherings. The Outlaw Album isn't Winter's Bone, but it's still got that lonely soulful mountain feel and that's good enough.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Excellent read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The_Paperback_Pursuer More than 1 year ago
Description: The Outlaw Album by Daniel Woodrell is a set of 12 short stories describing "those on the fringes of society". These include a man who seeks revenge for the murder of his wife's dog; a girl who makes her rapist uncle pay for his sins, and a jealousy that could be deadly to a hitchhiker. Review: Being a fan of the film version of Daniel Woodrell's Winter's Bone, I had a feeling I would enjoy a set of his "backwoods" short stories. Each of the twelve stories was chillingly realistic and gritty. I love the detail and the dialogue, especially in the most twisted tales, like in The Echo of Neighborly Bones. I also really like the cover art, it adds to the overall dark, twisted, and broken feel of the stories. My only complaint was that there weren't more stories since they were all between 7 and 28 pages each. I would recommend The Outlaw Album to anyone in the mood for some seriously unsettling and eerie stories of the "invisible" outlaws. Rating: On the Run (4.5/5) ***I received this book from Little, Brown and Company (Hachette Book Group) in exchange for an honest and unbiased review.
Atty_Tude More than 1 year ago
I highly recommend this book of captivating short stories of the fringes of the down and out.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Don't waste your money. The author must have gotten more and more wasted as he struggled to complete this. Winter's Bone was his one good shot.