Native Nations: Cultures and Histories of Native North America

Native Nations: Cultures and Histories of Native North America

by Nancy Bonvillain Bard College at Simon's Rock

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Overview

Combining historical background with discussion of contemporary Native nations and their living cultures, this comprehensive text introduces students to some of the many indigenous peoples in North America. The book is organized into parts corresponding to regional divisions within which similar, though not identical, cultural practices developed. Each part opens with an overview of the topography, climate, and natural resources in the area, and describes the range of cultural practices and beliefs grounded in the area. Subsequent chapters are devoted to specific tribal groups, their history, and the conditions of contemporary Native communities.

Nancy Bonvillain provides context for the regional and tribe-specific chapters through a brief overview of Native American history beginning around 1500 and covering the early period of European exploration and colonization. She details both U.S. and Canadian policies affecting the lives, cultures, and survival of more than five hundred Native nations on this continent. Finally, she offers up-to-date demographics and addresses significant social, economic, and political issues concerning Native communities.

The second edition features new material throughout, including a new two-chapter section on the Native nations of the Plateau, expanded introductory material addressing topics such as climate change and recent Supreme Court decisions, up-to-date demographic and economic data, and more.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781442251465
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
Publication date: 11/15/2016
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 552
File size: 181 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Nancy Bonvillain is professor of anthropology and linguistics at Bard College at Simon’s Rock. She is author of several university-level textbooks (Cultural Anthropology; Language, Culture, and Communication; Women and Men) in addition to numerous specialized books written for young readers about Native Americans, including The Zuni, The Santee Sioux, The Hopi, The Teton Sioux, The Sac and Fox, The Haidas, The Cheyennes, The Mohawk, The Huron, The Nez Perce, The Navajos, Hiawatha, and Black Hawk.
Nancy Bonvillain is a professor of anthropology and linguistics at Bard College at Simon's Rock. She is author of over twenty books on language, culture, and gender, including a series on Native American peoples. In her field work she studied the Mohawk and Navajo, and she has published a grammar and dictionary of the Akwesasne dialect of Mohawk. She received her PhD from Columbia University and has taught at Columbia University, The New School, SUNY Purchase and Stonybrook, and Sarah Lawrence College.

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Preface

This book presents an intensive discussion of the cultures, histories, and contemporary lives of members of the First Nations of North America. Following an introduction (Chapter One), is an overview (Chapter Two) of historical processes that have affected indigenous peoples since about 1500. Both Chapters One and Two discuss the complexity of population statistics that in the past and present have seriously undercounted Native communities and individuals. The book is thereafter divided into eight regional parts (Northeast, Southeast, Plains, Great Basin, Southwest, California, Northwest Coast, and Subarctic and Arctic). Each part begins with an overview chapter followed by one (or in some cases two) chapters that deal in detail with a First Nation within the region. The book concludes (Chapter Twenty-three) with a review of contemporary indigenous economic and political issues and also summarizes current economic and social data collected by the governments of Canada and the United States.

I wish to express my thanks to the following Prentice Hall reviewers for their useful comments on the manuscript: Stephen Greymorning, University of Montana; Timothy J. Kloberdanz, North Dakota State University; Sally McBeth, University of Northern Colorado; Martha McCullough, University of Nebraska; and Dean Snow, Pennsylvania State University. I also wish to thank Nancy Roberts, Publisher, and Sharon Chambliss, Managing Editor for anthropology, for their encouragement and advice throughout the process of bringing this book to completion. I appreciate the patience and excellent work of Cathy Dargi, who transcribed and typed the early draft of the book. And I thank Marc Melanson of Statistics Canada, Halifax, for his aid in obtaining linguistic, social, and economic data for First Nations Mi'kmaq, Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl), and Innu (Montagnais) bands.

My deep appreciation goes to the people at Akwesasne for the personal and intellectual support that I have always received there. I am especially grateful to Gloria Thompson, Ernest Benedict, Beatrice Francis, and their families, as well as to Hilda Swamp for the many days over many years spent in their company. My admiration goes to them and others at Akwesasne who have led and participated in many struggles for cultural and political sovereignty. It is to them that this book is dedicated.

Table of Contents


Brief Table of Contents
List of Tables

Preface to the Second Edition
  1. Introduction
Part I: Native North America
  1. A Short History
  2. Native Communities Today
Part II: The Northeast
Iroquois Story of the Origin of the False Faces
  1. Native Nations of the Northeast
  2. The Mohawks
  3. The Mi’kmaqs
Part III: The Southeast
Choctaw Story of Creation
  1. Native Nations of the Southeast
  2. The Choctaws
Part IV: The Plains
  1. Native Nations of the Plains
  2. The Teton Lakotas
  3. The Hidatsas
Part V: The Great Basin
  1. Native Nations of the Great Basin
  2. The Shoshones
Part VI: The Southwest
  1. Native Nations of the Southwest
  2. The Zunis
  3. The Diné (or Navajos)
Part VII: California
  1. Native Nations of California
  2. The Pomos
Part VIII: The Plateau
  1. Native Nations of the Plateau
  2. The Nez Perce
Part IX: The Northwest Coast
  1. Native Nations of the Northwest Coast
  2. The Kwakwaka’wakw (or Kwakiutls)
Part X The Subarctic and Arctic
  1. Native Nations of the Subarctic and Arctic
  2. The Innu (or Montagnais)
  3. The Inuit

Appendix: Websites for Native Nations in the United States and Canada
Credits
Index

Preface

Preface

This book presents an intensive discussion of the cultures, histories, and contemporary lives of members of the First Nations of North America. Following an introduction (Chapter One), is an overview (Chapter Two) of historical processes that have affected indigenous peoples since about 1500. Both Chapters One and Two discuss the complexity of population statistics that in the past and present have seriously undercounted Native communities and individuals. The book is thereafter divided into eight regional parts (Northeast, Southeast, Plains, Great Basin, Southwest, California, Northwest Coast, and Subarctic and Arctic). Each part begins with an overview chapter followed by one (or in some cases two) chapters that deal in detail with a First Nation within the region. The book concludes (Chapter Twenty-three) with a review of contemporary indigenous economic and political issues and also summarizes current economic and social data collected by the governments of Canada and the United States.

I wish to express my thanks to the following Prentice Hall reviewers for their useful comments on the manuscript: Stephen Greymorning, University of Montana; Timothy J. Kloberdanz, North Dakota State University; Sally McBeth, University of Northern Colorado; Martha McCullough, University of Nebraska; and Dean Snow, Pennsylvania State University. I also wish to thank Nancy Roberts, Publisher, and Sharon Chambliss, Managing Editor for anthropology, for their encouragement and advice throughout the process of bringing this book to completion. I appreciate the patience and excellent work of Cathy Dargi, who transcribed and typed the early draft of the book.And I thank Marc Melanson of Statistics Canada, Halifax, for his aid in obtaining linguistic, social, and economic data for First Nations Mi'kmaq, Kwakwaka'wakw (Kwakiutl), and Innu (Montagnais) bands.

My deep appreciation goes to the people at Akwesasne for the personal and intellectual support that I have always received there. I am especially grateful to Gloria Thompson, Ernest Benedict, Beatrice Francis, and their families, as well as to Hilda Swamp for the many days over many years spent in their company. My admiration goes to them and others at Akwesasne who have led and participated in many struggles for cultural and political sovereignty. It is to them that this book is dedicated.

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