My Name Is Celia:The Life of Celia Cruz/ Me llamo Celia: La vida de Celia Cruz

My Name Is Celia:The Life of Celia Cruz/ Me llamo Celia: La vida de Celia Cruz

Hardcover(Bi-lingual edition: English-Spanish lang)

$15.95
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Overview

This bilingual book allows young readers to enter Celia Cruz's life as she becomes a well-known singer in her homeland of Cuba, then moves to New York City and Miami where she and others create a new type of music called salsa.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780873588720
Publisher: Cooper Square Publishing Llc
Publication date: 10/30/2004
Edition description: Bi-lingual edition: English-Spanish lang
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 93,144
Product dimensions: 9.41(w) x 10.94(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range: 5 - 8 Years

About the Author

Monica Brown, Ph.D. is the author of many award-winning books for children, including Pablo Neruda: Poet of the People, winner of the Américas Award for Children's Literature and an Orbis Pictus Honor for Outstanding Nonfiction, and Waiting for the Biblioburro, a Christopher Award winner. She is a Professor of English at Northern Arizona University, specializing in U.S. Latino Literature and Multicultural Literature. She is a recipient of the prestigious Rockefeller Fellowship on Chicano Cultural Literacies from the Center for Chicano Studies at the University of California. She lives with her husband and two daughters in Flagstaff, Arizona.
Rafael López is an award-winning children's book illustrator whose work is a fusion of strong graphic style and magical symbolism. In 2012, he won the Pura Belpré honor in illustration for The Cazuela that the Farm Maiden Stirred, written by Samantha Vamos. His Illustrations for Book Fiesta! written by Pat Mora were the recipient of the 2010 Pura Belpré Illustrator Award given by the American Library Association to honor work that best portrays, affirms and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in children's books.

Customer Reviews

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My Name Is Celia:The Life of Celia Cruz/ Me llamo Celia: La vida de Celia Cruz 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 5 reviews.
dianaking on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This non-fiction book is written about the life of Celia Cruz. The author mentions that Celia Cruz grew up in Cuba with eleven brothers and sisters surrounded with extended family members. She tells of growing up singing and neighbors coming out of their homes to enjoy her music. A teacher actually encourages sharing her singing and Celia travels long distances to sing. She ends up with the title ¿Queen of Salsa¿.I enjoyed the book. I knew she was given the title of ¿Queen of Salsa¿, but didn¿t know what country she originated from. It is very important that a book was written for juveniles to read and become informed. She is not someone you would read about in our history books. In the classroom, I would have my students research an individual and write a short story informing all the students. Make a point to include an unknown fact about your individual.Another lesson, I would have the students create a timeline about Celia Cruz¿s life. Start with her birth to death date.
crochetbunnii on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Personal Response:I love how the illustrations are more subdued when she is discussing her childhood, but you see hints of the flamboyant designs creeping into her story as she explains how her background molded her into the salsa queen. I appreciated the short explanation of Celia Cruz's life at the end and the actual photo of the singer was a nice touch to remind the reader that this vibrant story is true.Curricular Connections:In a public library setting, I would use this book in conjunction with other picture book biographies about musicians and play some samples of their music during a music & movement story time. Give the children some instruments and let them have a great time enjoying music. Another great idea would be to invite local musicians from the community or a community group that practices salsa dancing to demonstrate for the kids and maybe teach a few steps.
cassiusclay on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
personal response: The color in this book is fantastic. The language is as enthusiastic as the illustrations. I don't speak spanish so half the book is useless to me, but it is fun to pick out what I remember from the 4 years i took spanish in highschool and middle school.curricular connection:excellent for coinciding with learning spanish or englishhave student write and illustrate their own short autobiographies
erika_elizabeth More than 1 year ago
My Name Is Celia, Me llamo Celia is a bilingual book that tell the life story of a Cuban woman Celia Cruz. She tells her story in rhythmic verse, with artwork that practically leaps off the page from sheer enthusiasm.This book is a very energetic and bright picture-book that makes you just want to dance. My son, only three, loved to see all the beautiful pictures and hear the story read aloud. Although some people may think the word choice is not child friendly, I think if told correctly a child can understand the meaning with the help of the amazing artwork. This picture book is a bright and energetic and just fun to read aloud. I love that this book is a bilingual book, currently i am tutoring bilingual students who very much enjoy this book, because they can relate to being from a different culture. I do recommend this book, it a great read for adults and 3-6 grade children.
WH6 More than 1 year ago
Celia Cruz was a Latina salsa singer from Cuba. This story tells of her life and the difficulties she faced when trying to get her voice heard. Since she was a small girl, she loved to sing but as she tried to sing in some places, they wouldn't let her because of the color of her skin. She formed a band with her friends and together they created their own sound. Despite challenges, Celia worked hard to become one of the world's most popular salsa singer. I really liked this book. This book is filled with bright, colorful pictures to that add to the tone of the book. This would be a very appropriate book to read with children, especially those of Hispanic background because it is in English and Spanish.