Kon-Tiki (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

Kon-Tiki (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition)

by Thor Heyerdahl

Hardcover(Library Binding - THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY)

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Overview

Photographs illustrate the author's account of his voyage from Peru to Tahiti on a balsa raft to test a theory concerning the origins of the Polynesian race.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780833513861
Publisher: Turtleback Books
Publication date: 05/01/1990
Edition description: THIS EDITION IS INTENDED FOR USE IN SCHOOLS AND LIBRARIES ONLY
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 730,518
Product dimensions: 4.19(w) x 6.69(h) x 0.75(d)
Lexile: 1310L (what's this?)
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

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Kon-Tiki 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 36 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
A tale of bold explorers risking life and liberty for an adventure and to prove an historical hypothesis. This is a great story that reflects 'freedom of spirit' in the world. Refreshing in this day of lazy, arm-chair, Monday morning quarterbacks.
Guest More than 1 year ago
You want adventure? You want risk? You want thrills? You want a mind-out-of-body experience while reading? Then, by all means, read KON-TIKI! No one believed he could do it. They all said he was crazy. He didn't even know how to swim! But he sailed across the pacific and proved his controversial theory. I've read it 4 times and will undoubtedly read it 4 times more - at least. It's an amazing, thrilling read. Please don't miss this book. It's one of those books you never forget.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a piece of history well told. Everyone said they would die in the attempt, but they arrived where they set out to go and proved what they wanted to prove.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The premise of the book is very interesting (how the Pacific Islands were settled) but the book itself grew a little repetitive. I lost count of how many times a large fish came to investigate the raft, or a fish jumped or swam up onto the raft and became a meal. I would have liked the book more if it offered some insight into what the men on board were thinking. This was really not touched upon, instead I felt I was reading the same chapter over and over again.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Kon Tiki is good read. Notice I said 'good'. This book gave me mixed feelings. At times it dragged on a little, yet at times, it really picks up. I am in the 8th grade, so thats probably why I wasn't as into it as other people. This is a good sea adventure book, unlike Treasure Island. Overall, I liked this book and thought it was a cool story. I would give it 3 1/2 stars, but in a way, it deserves 4. I hope you like this book, and I hope you won't get bored. :-)
Guest More than 1 year ago
After a somewhat slow beginning, Kon Tiki is hard to put down. The book takes almost a documentary approach with Heyerdahl spending almost no time developing characters or leading the reader to extract a theme or moral. Just as well! The action is sustaining with ample discussions of storms, sea creatures, and challenges with the raft. Read the book and then remind yourself that it is a true story that took place during the Truman presidency. No sonar and accompanying yachts here--just pure adventure! Get a copy with photographs; they're terrific.
SeriousGrace on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was a lot of fun to read. I enjoyed everything about this adventure. Heyerdahl is a fabulous storyteller and really funny too. Although slightly inaccurate, Heyerdahl was convinced there was a connection between the peoples of South America and the population of the Polynesian (Easter/Tahitian) Islands. Building a raft made of the same materials the Incas would have used (balsa wood, bamboo and other natural elements), Heyerdahl and five companions spent 101 days crossing 4,300 nautical miles of the Pacific ocean in all kinds of weather to prove the point. The six men (five from Norway and one Swede) took turns cooking and steering and got along surprisingly well for a group of grown men stuck in the middle of the Pacific for almost four months. They endured raging seas, wild winds and all sorts of aquatic creatures that insisted on joining them on the raft. The episode with the squid was especially disturbing.The photography, while in 1940s black and white, is a helpful addition to the story. Imagining the size and heft of the raft would be difficult without it.
Cecrow on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
In 1947, Norwegian archaeologist and WW2 veteran Thor Heyerdahl decided to test his theory that the Polynesian islands had been settled by South Americans rather than Asians. With five other men he constructed and boarded a small wooden raft, built according to design specifications recorded by early Spanish explorers, and navigated westward from Peru with intent to land on a tiny spot of land several months' distant. The building of the raft is briefly told, but is a story in itself. The determination of these men to meet their timeline for launch was awesome, especially in 1947 with limited transportation and communications compared to today. We're talking no cell phones, no internet, no GPS. Long after I would have shrugged and said "maybe next year", they kept finding workarounds. I was especially impressed with how much thought and care went towards accommodating the psychological effects six men would face while living alone on a small raft for several months. My appreciation for this preparedness increased when the image was fully revealed of just how quiet, endless and - well - boring this trip would have been for me as a passenger. Speaking as someone who doesn't even swim, it was hard to imagine living for so many days with nothing but water surrounding and washing over you, the same unchanging scenery with no landmarks on the horizon. Aside from being riddled with casually mentioned feats of endurance and near-death-experiences, much of the story is taken up with describing the only thing worth observing besides measurements: the wide array of aquatic sea-life which might have lain hidden to noisy engines, but that became companionable with the noiseless raft. The ocean provided fresh food, and the men's primary source of entertainment. As the author put it, "with such company in the water, time never passed slowly." Only once did he remark on someone's wishing for dry land, and that well towards the end of the voyage. The voyage reached its destination, as related, but failed to provide convincing evidence for the author's theory that Polynesia was settled from South America. His opinion remains rather isolated to this day in scientific circles, despite his seemingly viable arguments. This paints him as a bit of a maverick, but does nothing to detract from this book's enduring quality as a good true-life adventure story.The author went on to conduct a number of other rafting adventures around the world. Thor Heyerdahl was seen on worldwide television in 1994 as a host at Norway's Olympic Games ceremonies, and later died following a brain tumour diagnosis in 2002 at age 87. The original Kon-Tiki raft is housed in a museum in Oslo.
keylawk on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Thor Heyerdahl tested the hypothesis of a westward migration to Rapa Nui. The sweet potato was the staple food and it was developed in Peru. Although Linguistic, and even genetic ties are to Polynesia, there was no other explanation for the presence of the sweet potato. In 1947, with his 13.7 meter (45 ft) balsa raft Kon Tiki, Thor showed that in an El Nino year, the Humboldt Current and the trade winds are primarily westerly. Kon Tiki drifted with 6 Norse scientists aboard for 4,300 nautical miles for 3 months and reached the Polynesian island of Raroia (Puka Puka) in the Tuamotus. Heyerdahl also notes the unique Pre-Inca Peruvian quality of the stone walls at Ahu Vinapu. In addition, the tradition of a short-ear race annihilating a long-ear race is unique to Easter Island.Kon-Tiki, speaking of linguistic connections, is said to be an "old name" for the Inca sun god, Viracocha. The word Tiki is not in Rapanui, although it appears in Maori (the name of the first man), Tuamotuan, and as ti'i in Tahitian, and ki'i in Hawaiian. "Tiki" culture is now native to nowhere, but has evolved into a tropical theme decor.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Charlottes-son More than 1 year ago
One of those charming books that have been promoted for years. It is that good.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kon Tiki is the tale of how Heyerdahl and five other courageous men set out to prove the origins of the Polynesian people, conquering the Pacific Ocean using only a raft. It is full of experiences and exploits that make one believe that the ocean in the Life of Pi is realistic. Heyerdahl expertly recounts the true ingeniousness of the primitive people's construction of the balsa raft with their own replica, and its astounding sea-worthiness. Kon Tiki is a whale of a tale that does not disappoint. I recommend this book to anyone who is in need of an excellent non-fiction read,  and I especially recommend this book to those with interests in anthropological studies. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Kon Tiki is an excellent book describing the adventure of six men crossing  the pacific in a raft.   I had to read a non-fiction book for 12th grade English, and Kon Tiki was no disappointment. It was a bit slow at times, but I recommend it to anyone who loves a good adventure. I highly recommend this book to people interested in anthropological studies, as Thor presents a solid case for his argument regarding the origins of the Polynesian peoples.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this many years ago and could hardly wait to get back to it. It is one of the best true adventure tales of the ages and I have given a copy to one of my grandchildren for Xmas along with another of Thor Heyerdahl's books. He is the best.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I am in the middle of the book and am so excited even though I know the outcome. It is beautifullly written. So uplifting. I highly recommend it to anyone eho has an adventurous heart. I recently saw the new movie of the same name and enjoyed it so much that I had to read the book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I first read this book when it was first published by the origional, author, i prefer that edition, thor was an interesting man who was not afraid to test his theories even when he could not be sure of the outcome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
THIS IS AN AWESOME ADVENTURE TAKING PLACE ON THE SURFACE OF THE PACIFIC.
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