The Kiss Murder

The Kiss Murder

by Mehmet Murat Somer

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Overview

The Number One Ladies' Detective Agencymeets Pedro Almodovar in this outrageous new series featuring an ultraglamorous sleuth

Bestsellers in Mehmet Murat Somer's home country of Turkey and set to take the world by storm, the arrival of the Hop-Çiki-Yaya mysteries is cause for excitement (and lip gloss!) here in the United States. A male computer technician by day and a transvestite hostess of Istanbul's most notorious nightclub by night, the unnamed heroine of The Kiss Murder is the most charming and hilarious sleuth to debut in recent memory. When Buse, one of the "girls"at her club, fears someone is after private letters from a former lover, she comes to her boss for help. The next day Buse is dead and our girl must find the murderers before they find her. Fortunately, she is well armed with beauty, wit, the wardrobe of Audrey Hepburn, and expert Thai kickboxing skills. With a page-turning plot and an irresistibly charming protagonist, The Kiss Murder is sure to attract mystery lovers and nightlife mavens alike.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781440655708
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 12/30/2008
Series: A Turkish Delight Mystery , #1
Sold by: Penguin Group
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 256
Sales rank: 888,160
File size: 306 KB
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

Mehmet Murat Somer was born in Ankara in 1959. After graduating from Middle Eastern University (ODTÜ) School of Industrial Engineering, he worked for a short time as an engineer, and for an extended period as a banker. Since 1994, he has been a management consultant, conducting corporate seminars on management skills and personal development. Somer has written a number of made-to-order scenarios for feature films and television series, as well as classical music critiques for various newspapers and magazines. He currently lives in Istanbul.

Customer Reviews

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Kiss Murder (Turkish Delight Series) 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Frisbeesage More than 1 year ago
The Kiss Murder is the very over-the-top story of a drag queen who owns a nightclub in Istanbul. One of her "girls" comes to her worried about the secrets she harbors about a top political man. The next day the girl is dead and our heroine is out to discover who killed her and why.
This is an outrageous and fanciful book! If you are looking for an intricate, realistic murder plot this is not the story of you. However, it is entertaining, occasionaly funny, and definately different then anything else you've read. I wasn't crazy about the ambiguous ending, but it did keep me reading all the way to the end.
Makereta on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
NOT high art, NOT thriller of this or any other year - but so camp, so colourful, and really funny. I loved this book!
frisbeesage on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Kiss Murder is the very over-the-top story of a drag queen who owns a nightclub in Istanbul. One of her "girls" comes to her worried about the secrets she harbors about a top political man. The next day the girl is dead and our heroine is out to discover who killed her and why.This is an outrageous and fanciful book! If you are looking for an intricate, realistic murder plot this is not the story of you. However, it is entertaining, occasionaly funny, and definately different then anything else you've read. I wasn't crazy about the ambiguous ending, but it did keep me reading all the way to the end.
lindapanzo on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When I saw a review calling the sleuth in The Kiss Murder "Istanbul's Miss Marple," I was intrigued. I like Turkish mysteries. I love Miss Marple. What could be better? Though the nameless sleuth is, in some ways, like Miss Marple, picture Miss Marple as a transvestite nightclub owner in Istanbul and you'll get a feel for The Kiss Murder.I've read over 1,600 mysteries but I can honestly say I've never read a mystery like The Kiss Murder. Parts of it were fun and entertaining. Some parts, not so much. Even though I thought it was only okay to good, I think it has great potential and I've already bought the next one in the Turkish Delights series.The Kiss Murders is probably not for everyone but it is entertaining in an odd sort of way.
bridget3420 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Kiss Murder is about club owning drag queen resembling Audrey Hepburn, who uses her inner detective skills to find out who has murdered her transvestite friend, Buse. The night before Buse's murder she told the drag queen that she was scared and someone was after her. Audrey's look a like sets out to find the murderer but soon finds that this is no easy task. What she uncovers is a shocker. WIll she be able to connect the dots and find out who the killer is or will she end up dead as well?This was a very fun, quick paced read. I will definitely be picking up the next book "The Gigilo Murders" which comes out in September.
yooperprof on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Glamorous Turkish drag queen (whose day job is as a computer consultant) attempts to unravel the mystery behind a colleague's murder, and unwittingly discovers a web of blackmail and political intrigue. Fortunately our heroine is a master of Thai kick-boxing! Amusing romp set in the intriguing milieu of Istanbul's transvestite community. There are a few hints of underlying corruption and hypocrisy among the politically and socially powerful in contemporary Turkey, but essentially this is "light reading." I did find it very interesting to read about "same-sex sexuality" in a "modernizing" country that nonetheless retains strong elements of a traditional past. This is the first in Mehmet Murad Somer's "Turkish Delight" series that I've read - I'm planning to get at least one more. It would be nice if there was a little more substance in the next one that I read, but it's escapism, so I won't mind too much if there isn't!
miyurose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The last thing I would expect a book set in Istanbul to feature is a transvestite subculture, but that¿s exactly what you have in this Hop-Çiki-Yaya series. The nameless main character is quite interesting¿ he knows exactly what he is, and isn¿t apologetic about it. He plays up his masculine and feminine sides equally well. The story here isn¿t about the murder as much as it¿s about the blackmail, and the main character¿s drive to find out what is going on, mostly for his own curiosity. I didn¿t love the story, but I did enjoy it and would probably read more. I found the writing to be somewhat stilted and choppy, but I don¿t know if that¿s how the writing is or if it¿s an aftereffect of translation.
FicusFan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I decided to read this book and catch up on the series. I enjoyed it. It is more focused than the first book, with fewer characters and a tighter plot. The main character is also more polished, but still not all that likable. This time a transvestite, Buse, is being pressured to turn over incriminating pictures, and letters of her and a prominent straight man, who was once her lover. He is highly placed in a political party that features family values as its claim to power. Buse is killed and the race is on to find the documents and pictures. Buse's blind mother is missing, and an upstairs neighbor is murdered. There are competing groups: the blackmailers and those who work for the politician are stalking people, spying and threatening/roughing up people to get what they want.Some of the characters from the previous book are back, and some are missing. The POV's love interest is not in this book or even mentioned. The masochistic crippled hacker is also not mentioned. Several characters do reappear. Hassan the gossipy-nosy club Maitre'D, Husseyn the taxi driver with the puppy-dog crush on the POV. Hassan becomes unreliable, and the POV finally gives Husseyn a chance. The POV is still arrogant, self-absorbed, and prone to violence. She does seem to be more polished, and less nasty. She also acts a bit dumber in this book however. She refuses to talk to people who might have information or clues, refuses to listen to phone messages, because she is too busy, or tired. Its a common tactic to keep the suspense and mystery simmering, but with the POV talking about how stupid everyone else is, it doesn't sit well.Still it was an interesting, quick read set in a very different world. The writing was good and the translation worked well. I will read the next one.
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