Kin (Good Neighbors Series #1)

Kin (Good Neighbors Series #1)

by Holly Black, Ted Naifeh

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Overview

From the amazing imagination of bestselling author Holly Black, a mysterious and wonderful teen graphic novel masterpiece. Rue Silver's mother has disappeared . . . and her father has been arrested, suspected of killing her. But it's not as straightforward as that. Because Rue is a faerie, like her mother was. And her father didn't kill her mother -- instead, he broke a promise to Rue's faerie king grandfather, which caused Rue's mother to be flung back to the faerie world. Now Rue must go to save her -- and must also defeat a dark faerie that threatens our very mortal world.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780545328890
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 07/30/2013
Series: Good Neighbors Series , #1
Sold by: Scholastic, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 128
Sales rank: 320,547
File size: 20 MB
Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range: 12 - 17 Years

About the Author


Holly Black is the author of the bestselling series The Spiderwick Chronicles (with Tony DiTerlizzi), The Good Neighbors graphic novels, and the novels Tithe, Valiant, and Ironside. She currently lives in the realm of Western Massachusetts.

Ted Naifeh is the author and illustrator of many acclaimed graphic novels, including Polly and the Pirates, Courtney Crumrin and the Night Things, and Courtney Crumrin Tales: Portrait of the Warlock as a Young Man. He has also illustrated the popular Death Jr. and Gloomcookie series.

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Kin 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fo not buy nomatter what people say relly really really bad
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
DO NOT BUY THIS AS AN EBOOK!! I cannot tell if the story and art are any good or not because I can't freakin' see them. Each PAGE (all art, all panels, text) is less than half the size of the screen with inches of useless white margins around. It cannot be zoomed in on or enlarged, and the text is TINY. Practically impossible to read. This is no way to enjoy a graphic novel, someone really dropped the ball on executing this ebook. Don't waste your money, as you can't return it even though it is clearly a defective, unusable product for the buyer. Get the print version.
TeensReadToo More than 1 year ago
Rue is trying not to worry. Her mother has disappeared after a terrible fight with her father. Right after her mother disappears, her father is arrested and accused of murdering one of the students he teaches at the University. Rue knows her father didn't do anything wrong, but doesn't know how to prove it. To add to her stress, Rue starts seeing things. Things that shouldn't be possible in the real world. Things with wings. Things that look like faeries. While Rue's father is in jail, she is taken to meet the grandfather she's never met - her mother's father. She finds out that her grandfather is one of the fey, and what he has planned for the world is a danger to all mankind. Rue is the only one who can stop him. When Rue's mother makes a reappearance, she is extremely ill. Rue picks up some clues as to why her mother disappeared in the first place and puts others information together on her own. In between looking for clues to the real story behind the girl her father is accused of killing, finding out about her mother, and coming to terms with her heritage, Rue is trying to maintain her life at school and with her friends. KIN is the first volume in THE GOOD NEIGHBORS series. Holly Black wraps up this volume nicely while still leaving readers begging for more. Fans of Black's novels TITHE, VALIANT, and IRONSIDE will enjoy seeing the faeries come alive on the page of this graphic novel. Be looking for sequels in the near future.
krau0098 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first book in series of graphic novels called "The Good Neighbors" by Holly Black and Ted Naifeh. Looks like right now there are going to be three books. The second one is called "Kith" and it is already out. The third will be called "Kind" and will be out in 2010. I enjoyed this graphic novel a lot. Both the artwork and the story are very engaging.Rue's mom has disappeared and her dad has been accused of murdering one of his students. As if this isn't bad enough Rue is starting to see things that she shouldn't; things that no one else can see. What is happening to Rue and her family? Will she be able to figure it out in time to save her dad and find her mom?This book had a good plot; I was intrigued and am looking forward to reading the next graphic novel. As with most graphic novel series, this first book basically introduces you to the main characters and sets up the beginning of the story. Rue is a great character. Her friends areinteresting and the fair folk Rue meets are the most intriguing characters of all.The illustration throughout is awesome. I really enjoyed Naifeh's drawing style. All the pictures are in black and white. The detail that is in them is amazing; there are a number of pages you need to stare at for some time to process all that is going on in the drawings. Naifeh does an excellent job portraying the character's emotions.Both the writing and the illustration are dark and moody. This is definitely not a child's fairy tale, although there isn't anything that makes this a mature book (no swearing, minimal violence, etc.). This is a great graphic novel for young adults or adults who love fairies and love Holly Black's writing.I am eagerly awaiting the next book "Kith".
ElizaJane on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue's world is torn apart when her mother disappears and her professor father is held on suspicion of murdering a student. She finds out that her mother is a faerie who has returned home and Rue must deal with her own identity as she starts to see strange people that no one else can see. Absolutely beautifully drawn by Ted Naifeh of Courtney Crumrin fame, a better artist couldn't have been chosen to bring Holly Black's faerie world to life. I loved this story! Rue is a totally real person with a full set of emotions and one connects with her right away. I was drawn into the story from the opening pages and had an exciting read from start to finish. The shocking ending leaves me clamouring to read book 2
Aridy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue has not had the most normal of home lives, with a mother who acts kind of crazy and talks to plants and sometimes seeing things that she knows should not be real. When her mother suddenly goes missing and her father is blamed for the murder of a student, Rue's life suddenly starts to fall apart. And then things get stranger and worse as she finds out that she is part part fey (her mother being the daughter of King Aubrey (a ruler among the fey), along with the fact that her grandfather now thinks that she is a danger to him because of a prophesy.
AbundanceofBooks on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue's mother has disappeared and her father is moldering downstairs in a fit of depression. She believes her mother is crazy, something she tried to hide from her friends, and that she just wandered off. Rue just tries to go on with her life without thinking too much about the argument her parents had before her mom disappeared. An argument that implied her father had an affair and he would prevent her mother from leaving him. Rue has also been seeing some strange things, sprites and odd creatures that she can't explain. While she's out with her boyfriend and she discovers that a neighbor has called the police on her father. While in jail, one of Dr. Silver's students is found strangled in a nearby pond. Rue would then meet her young-looking and seemingly evil grandfather. The grandfather and his assistant Tam (Tam Lin, I'm guessing) want Rue to embrace her faerie side and help with a plan to make humans fear faeries once again. When Rue's mother shows back up, thus exonerating Dr. Silver, the story then moves along predictably. There's an equally predictable cliffhanger ending that will be picked up in Kith: The Good Neighbors book two.I like Holly Black's Modern Faerie tale books (Valiant, Ironside, etc.), but this story was just okay. Kin was setting up the story and was slightly predictable, but I do have high hopes for the the other books in the series. I was not a fan of Naifeh's artwork. The black and white ink drawings was a nice approach, I just didn't care for the pencil work. Characters tended to all look the same so I had to think about who the character was at times.Verdict:I appreciate the fact that Kin was setting up the story for the following books. Keeping that in mind, I'll definitely pick up Kith to see how the story moves along. I was disappointed in the the artwork so I probably won't buy the series unless I really liking the other books. So I say, check it out, I think this could be good.
crochetbunnii on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Personal Response:I enjoyed the idea behind this story. This would be one that I would recommend to goth teens interested in fantasy, basically people like my sister. I liked the depictions of the fairies and the style of art in general. I kind of hoped that the parts with fairies in them would be in color, but it is black and white throughout.Curricular Connections:This book could be included in a teen book group for a fantasy/gothic/graphic novel theme.
karafrib on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
¿I don¿t sweat stuff. Worrying just gives you wrinkles lines or stress hives or an acid stomach you can¿t soothe with a whole box of Tums.¿ At least, that¿s what Rue says at the beginning of The Good Neighbors, by Holly Black. Even though her mother has mysteriously disappeared and Rue is seeing strange creatures everywhere she turns, she insists that she is not worried. To make matters worse, Rue¿s father gets arrested for the murder of one of his college students and the murder of Rue¿s mother. Rue can¿t believe that her father would have done either, and intends to find out what really happened to her mother. But first, she must discover why she¿s seeing strange creatures at every turn. She doesn¿t have to wait long before her grandfather turns up¿and he just happens to be a fairy. He informs Rue that she is one of the fey as well and that she should come with him and leave her mortal life behind, but there is something about dear old grandpa that Rue just doesn¿t trust, and soon she cannot avoid being worried any longer. As the mysteries surrounding her mother and the dead college student become more and more involved with fairy affairs, and the city gets more and more overrun with plants, Rue realizes that it may be up to her to put a stop to whatever the fairies are plotting.The Good Neighbors is another successful foray into the darker world of the fey by Holly Black. The graphic novel¿s black and white illustrations are a perfect mixture of the normal and the bizarre, and truly make the story come alive while giving the reader a sense of how much the fey have saturated Rue¿s town. The fairies in this book are beautiful and terrifying all at once. Every part of the text and the illustrations is strategically placed, and nothing is unimportant. What appears in an illustration early in the book will inevitably play into the plot later. Mysterious characters and situations will have readers scrambling for the next volume in this series. Recommended for grades 8 and up.
LarissaBookGirl on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Everything was fine, normal even, except for the fact that Rue's mother has disappeared. Missing for over three weeks with no place to go, Rue can't imagine where she has gone to. But more disturbing then that is the things Rue has been seeing, things she shouldn't be seeing; things with wings, sharp teeth, pointy ears and claws. Rue was going crazy, but besides that everything was fine, normal even.Then the police arrived to take her father away. A student of his was dead and with her mother missing it looked as though her father was now responsible for two deaths. But how could it be true? There had to be another explanation for her mother's disappearance, for the death of a young girl and for the crazy things Rue was seeing. If there wasn't then it meant her father was a murderer, if there was then it meant there were far more things to fear in the world then anyone believed.Kin reveals to Rue the true nature of her mother's family, her parents past and her own identity. With a broken promise comes heartache and retribution. Danger, sacrifice and love reveal to Rue the mystery that has torn her world apart and what may be the only hope to bring it back together. Timeless themes of changelings and faerie wives are portrayed within these dark and gothic images, telling a story that is just as dark and it is tragic.
terriko on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I am not surprised at all to find that Holly Black's work adapts nicely to the graphic novel format. In some ways, this is just a modernization of an old fairy stories about changelings and human-fairy romances, and feels a lot like a story you've already heard as a result, but it's nicely told and beautifully illustrated.
bezoar44 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is more fantasy than horror, but it's awfully close to the line. Rue Silver's mother has gone missing, her father spends most of his days slumped on the couch, and vines are growing fast all over town. Then Rue starts seeing fey creatures that are invisible to all her friends. This first volume of three covers Rue's efforts to understand why her mom disappeared, and why she can see things no one else can. The art is serviceable - sometimes characters look oddly mashed when shown in 3/4 views - and the overall mood is dark.
doxtator on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The librarian sweet-talked me into borrowing this one, and it was good. It's a fast read, although the drawings (black and white, grey-scale, ink-style) are interesting enough that I went back and read through again, taking time to notice details in the artwork. The story is compelling, the teenagers are mostly realistic for today's kids, and there are a couple different layers of storyline going on. It's got a very nice depth for a young adult graphic novel. The only downside is that since this is part of a series, the story is only begun in this installment. There are obviously more things to come, and secrets to be told, and actions to be played out by characters.
mhg123 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue Silver's mother has disappeared . . . and her father has been arrested, suspected of killing her. But it's not as straightforward as that. Because Rue is a faerie, like her mother was. And her father didn't kill her mother -- instead, he broke a promise to Rue's faerie king grandfather, which caused Rue's mother to be flung back to the faerie world. Now Rue must go to save her -- and must also defeat a dark faerie that threatens our very mortal world.
callmecayce on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The back and inside cover of this book, and the fact that it's a YA graphic novel with a female lead, are what drew me to this book. It's short, not a Watchman length book, but that doesn't mean it's not good. In fact, I found it be exceptional. The drawings, while just black and white, don't need to be anything else. They're brilliant, expressive and scary all at once. The story is part mystery and part fantasy, with both genres mixing quite well together. I found myself easily pulled into the story, and once finished, I discovered I wanted the next book immediately (yes, there is a cliff hanger, so readers beware). I will probably check out some of Holly Black's other works as well.
kperry on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue is trying not to worry. Her mother has disappeared after a terrible fight with her father. Right after her mother disappears her father is arrested and accused of murdering one of the students he teaches at the University. Rue knows her father didn¿t do anything wrong, but doesn¿t know how to prove it. To add to her stress, Rue starts seeing things. Things that shouldn¿t be possible in the real world. Things with wings. Things that look like faeries.While Rue¿s father is in jail she is taken to meet the grandfather she¿s never met - her mother¿s father. She finds out that her grandfather is one of the fey and what he has planned for the world is a danger to all mankind. Rue is the only one who can stop him.When Rue¿s mother makes a reappearance, she is extremely ill. Rue picks up some clues as to why her mother disappeared in the first place and puts others information together on her own.In between looking for clues to the real story behind the girl her father is accused of killing, finding out about her mother, and coming to terms with her heritage, Rue is trying to maintain her life at school and with her friends.THE GOOD NEIGHBORS is the first volume in the KIN series. Holly Black wraps up this volume nicely while still leaving readers begging for more. Fans of Black¿s novels Tithe, Valiant, and Ironside will enjoy seeing the faeries come alive on the page of the graphic novel. Be looking for sequels sometime in the future.
razzbelly on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Pretty good. Story doesn't flow as well as other graphic novels I have read, but it's the first one and it was trying to set up the story series in a short space.I look forward to reading the next one.
knielsen83 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Who doesn't love faeries, goth chicks, and graphic novels? Well if you don't love these three things, this is not the book for you. If you do... read it, love it, and wait for the next one.
MeriJenBen on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue, a young woman who sees strange things, is trying not to worry about her mother's disappearence, and her father's complete breakdown. However, when her father is accused of murder, and the strange things she sees start taking back, she can no longer deny her heritage. I really wanted to like this book more than I did. I think the problem, for me, was in Naifeh's artwork. His extensive use of greyscale gives the book atmosphere, and makes it incredibly difficult to tell what's going on. His character designs are all very similar, tall and angular, which served to muddy the plot. Black does dark faerie very well, and I was a little disappointed in this iteration of it. For all the dark warnings and forboding, there is very little payoff. However, this is the first volume in a series, and things might pick up later.
EKAnderson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
With the help of illustrator Ted Naifeh, Holly Black has built another Faerie world for us to love. The first book of the Good Neighbors, Kin, begins the unraveling of a mystery (he disappearance of her mother) - which, of course, leads to a few other mysteries (Did her father kill her? And who is her mother, really?) that our main character, Rue Silver, has to follow to fruition. The problem with the mystery element of Black's narrative is that it is too fast-paced. There is no breathing room for the reader to draw his own conclusions from the clues, which are subtle on one page but explained on the next. But what seems to be lacking in pacing is made up for with the twists that the authors have woven into the plot as it unfolds: the secret family feud, the old-timey folklore, the curses, the love triangles, the P.I.-esque detective work. All of this is seamlessly layered onto our modern world, where teenagers go out for coffee and chat online and go to rock n roll shows. While perhaps not as enchanting as the first Spiderwick series, the Good Neighbors is promising ¿ an exciting read with hearty visual accompaniment.
timothyl33 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While somewhat interesting, I felt that the story of the fae could have been drawn and written better by others.
TeenBookReviews on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue Silver¿s life has turned upside down. Her mother is missing, her father stands accused of murder and now she is starting to see things that can¿t be real. Is she going crazy? Or is the another answer? As Rue digs deeper into her family¿s past, she discovers that nothing is as it seems. Well drawn, though somewhat monochromatic, Kin is an interesting first chapter in a new dark fairy series. Rue¿s character is decently well developed, although some of the secondary characters could use a little more explanation. It will be interesting to see where Black and Naifeh take the story. Will Rue join the fairies of her mother¿s side, or maintain her wish for a ¿normal¿ existence. As with many of Black¿s work, Kin is edgy so I would recommend this graphic novel for mature readers who enjoy a bit of dark in their fantasy.
mikitchenlady on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not a huge graphic novel fan but really liked this one. Surprisingly (to me at least) I found myself stopping and going back over pictures to help me keep up with what was going on as illustrated by the dialogue. Good for middle school as well as high school.
thelittlebookworm on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue is trying not to worry when her parents have a big argument and her mother disappears. To fill her time, she hangs out with her rocker boyfriend and their two friends, but she begins seeing inhumanly things around her as she finds out what she is destined for.A nicely drawn graphic novel with an interesting fairy theme, that although may sound familiar, draws you in anyway. Black's writing is always good.
SunnySD on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Rue Silver's is seeing weird stuff, her mother's disappeared, her father's acting funny (and he's been arrested and accused of murder), and her mother's family claim to be Fae royalty. Oh, and trees and vines are taking over the city. A coming of age graphic novel with a gripping premise, but unfortunately not much happens - oh, wait... I guess you have to read the rest of the series.I usually like Holly Black, so maybe it's just the format here I'm not adjusting to, but I couldn't quite get into this one.