Justine

Justine

by Marquis de Sade

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Overview

‘Justine’ was the Marquis de Sade's first novella, written in 1787, whilst imprisoned for two weeks in the Bastille. Although published anonymously, de Sade was eventually indicted for blasphemy and obscenity (without trial) for the authorship of ‘Justine’ at the behest of Napoleon Bonaparte.

Who suffers in the pursuit of desire?

The Countess de Lorsange reveals her history, in a tavern, to a young woman named Therese; where a young girl and her sister fight a battle of morality. Set in a period before the French Revolution, Justine shows the battle of virtue versus vice, where earning your keep takes on fresh connotations, and a titled lady holds a lifetime of illicit secrets.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780007300440
Publisher: HarperCollins UK
Publication date: 01/19/2009
Series: Harper Perennial Forbidden Classics Series , #2
Pages: 224
Sales rank: 428,304
Product dimensions: 4.40(w) x 6.90(h) x 0.70(d)

About the Author

The Marquis de Sade was a French aristocrat, revolutionary and writer of violent pornography. Incarcerated for 32 years of his life (in prisons and asylums), the majority of his output was written from behind bars. Famed for his graphic depiction of cruelty within classic titles such as ‘Crimes of Love’ and ‘One Hundred Days of Sodom’, de Sade's name was adopted as a clinical term for the sexual fetish known as ‘sadism’.

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Justine (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 3.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 28 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Sade's 'Justine' is a major work in de Sade's career and a powerful work, but it's ruined by this horrible translation. The translator opted to use obsolete 'old English' phraseology (the translator uses ¿thee¿, ¿thy¿, and ¿thou¿), rendering the novel almost unreadable and ruining the power and force of Sade¿s writing. In addition to the translation problems, this edition has an introduction that is loaded with factual errors. The person who wrote the introduction makes the ridiculous claim that ¿Justine¿ was the only time the Sade had a woman narrator, and discusses this at some length. Apparently, she never bothered to read ¿Julliette¿ or ¿Florville and Courval,¿ both major works of Sade, and both of which have female narrators. ¿Justine¿ can be found in far better English translations, with erudite commentary. Interested readers should seek out those volumes and avoid this one.
BaxterBoy More than 1 year ago
I agree with everything stated above. This is such a beautifully written book, but an awful translation... to anyone interested in reading Justine, choose any of the many translations out there, but I wouldn't reccomend this one!
gigi_13 More than 1 year ago
I purchased this book only because I was looking for something new and I happened to come accross it at the bookstore. What was intriguing was the fact that Marquis De Sade was the author which made me curious because I had not read any of his work. This book has some very disturbing scenes that almost made me put down the book but I thought better of it and am not disappointed. It provides a psychological view to sexual experiences and if you are able to read it without judgment then you will appreciate the work for what it is. It is amazing that this was written so long ago and is still a dark, interesting and shocking masterpiece that will have you analyzing the characters desires and morality. The characters are not great yet they are what moves the story along and provide an ocean of actions to analyze.
Guest More than 1 year ago
de Sade shows himself here to be the true forefather of psychology, muting Frued when read after Frued. The balance of pleasure and pain and the truth that we create our realities in society through personal and tribal belief comes through with astonishing brilliance.
Joybee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I actually enjoyed this book. However it is not for the easily offended, or squeamish. Justine and Juliette are orphaned sisters. They were raised, in a rich family, to be good virtuous girls and had no skills. When orphaned at 12 and 15, with no money, the girls went their separate ways, Justine to be virtuous and seek people's kindness, and Juliette to 'surrender herself to libertinage'. This book is mostly about Justine's struggles trying to make her way through life where everything seems to be against her. There is a lot of sexual abuse, and rape and horrific sadism. Justine goes through a lot and just when you think her life is going to get better, misfortune awaits. The moral of the story is "that true happiness is to be found nowhere but in Virtue's womb, and that if, in keeping with designs it is not for us to fathom, God permits that it be persecuted on Earth, it is so that Virtue may be compensated by Heaven's most dazzling rewards."
sarah_rubyred on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I did get confused over who was listening at what time and to whom. This is the story of a young orphan whose inheritance was lost. Although everyone keeps telling her to sell her body or to become a bad person as then the money will come, she is determined to live a pious life, ultimately meaning she has to suffer horrific sexual and physical abuse anyway.I do believe it is possible to live a happy life, whilst being 'good', without having to prostrate myself in front of every rich (and obviously evil) man or woman I come across, begging they listen to my story as I have no skills, and will not spend the time to learn any either. I just want your charity thank you.Interesting, but the young heroine is no heroine of mine.
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Bookish_Ribaldry More than 1 year ago
of the works of Marquis de Sade I've read thus far 'Justine' is not my favorite but it does show the consistency of timeless storytelling and well crafted words.
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