The Imitation of Christ [NOOK eBook classics with optimized navigation]

The Imitation of Christ [NOOK eBook classics with optimized navigation]

by Thomas à Kempis, Penguin

NOOK Book(eBook)

$2.99
View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now
LEND ME® See Details

Overview

The Imitation of Christ (Latin: De Imitatione Christi) by Thomas à Kempis is a Christian devotional book. It was first composed in Latin ca.1418-1427. It is a handbook for spiritual life arising from the Devotio Moderna movement, where Kempis was a member. The Imitation is perhaps the most widely read devotional work next to the Bible, and is regarded as a devotional and religious classic.
The text is divided into four books which provide detailed spiritual instructions. The four books are, "Helpful Counsels of the Spiritual Life", "Directives for the Interior Life", "On Interior Consolation", "On the Blessed Sacrament".

The approach taken in the Imitation is characterized by its emphasis on the interior life and withdrawal from the world, as opposed to an active imitation of Christ by other friars. The book places a high level of emphasis on the devotion to the Eucharist as key element of spiritual life. [Quoted from wikipedia.org]

[NOOK eBook classics with optimized navigation]

This version contains advanced Nook TOC navigations with extra contents chapter links. Compatible with Nook, Nook Color (best view) and Nook for PC (best view).

Barnes & Noble: "NOOK for PC also allows you to use multiple devices to read the same book, which means you can start a chapter on your laptop, sneak a few pages in at work on your smartphone, and finish the last chapter on your NOOK or iPad in bed."

Product Details

BN ID: 2940012826084
Publisher: Gratitude Penguin
Publication date: 02/04/2011
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
File size: 173 KB

About the Author

"Thomas à Kempis (Thomas Hemerken, Thomas Hämerken, Thomas van Kempen, Tomás de Kempis) (ca.1380 - July 25, 1471) was a Renaissance Roman Catholic monk and author of Imitation of Christ, one of the best known Christian books on devotion.

He was born at Kempen (Germany), County of Cleves in 1380 and died in 1471 near Zwolle in the Prince-Bishopric of Utrecht, 75 miles north of his birthplace. His paternal name was Hemerken, Kleverlandish for "little hammer."

In 1395 he was sent to the school at Deventer conducted by the Brethren of the Common Life. He became skillful as a copyist and was thus enabled to support himself. Later he was admitted to the Augustinian convent of Mount Saint Agnes near Zwolle, where his brother John had been before him and had risen to the dignity of prior. Thomas received priest's orders in 1413 and was made subprior in 1429.

The house was disturbed for a time in consequence of the pope's rejection of the bishop-elect of Utrecht, Rudolf van Diepholt; otherwise, Thomas' life was a quiet one, his time being spent between devotional exercises, composition, and copying. He copied the Bible no less than four times, one of the copies being preserved at Darmstadt in five volumes. In its teachings he was widely read, and his works abound in Biblical quotations, especially from the New Testament.

His life is no doubt fitly characterized by the words under an old picture first referred to by Francescus Tolensis: "In all things I sought quiet and found it not save in retirement and in books." A monument was dedicated to his memory in the presence of the archbishop of Utrecht in St. Michael's Church, Zwolle, on November 11, 1897. Because of the closing of the church, his shrine was replaced in 2006 in an historical church in the centre of Zwolle.

Thomas à Kempis belonged to the school of mystics who were scattered along the Rhine from Switzerland to Strasburg and Cologne and in the Netherlands. He was a follower of Geert Groote and Florentius Radewijns, the founders of the Brethren of the Common Life.

His writings are all of a devotional character and include tracts and meditations, letters, sermons, a life of Saint Lydewigis, a Christian woman who remained steadfast under a great stress of afflictions." [Quoted from wikipedia.org]

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

The Imitation of Christ 3.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 26 reviews.
JulieBulie More than 1 year ago
This book has over a hundred chapters by topic but this particular edition doesn't include the table of contents! Your nook will only list the "go to" chapters by number and you'll have no idea what the topics are. I'm sharing this so that others don't waste their money. It's unfortunate this information isn't available until you purchase a non-refundable ebook.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Simply put, this book changed my life.
1_Mystical_Rose More than 1 year ago
A beautiful and inspiring guide to living in the Image of Christ. This book is simply structured by specific topics, short entries and scriptural citations. A "must have read" for enriching your prayer life and deepening your relationship with God.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I prefer this translation because it is the most penetrating, thought provoking, and most to the point. Comments on the book listed under various translations are not exaggerations. The book is applicable to all ages to all people, even non-Christians. The truths are basic, self-evident, and universal. You have already read or heard much content in other forms, but it is simply much better than anything you have ever read or heard on the myriad of ethical and moral issues. It is founded on basic Christian morality and theology, true, but non-Christians will appreciate and love the words as well. They may be surprised to find that they cherish every word as much (maybe in some cases more) than most Christians, regardless of some theology they do not agree with. I have also reviewed the other most recent translations. The one edited and translated by Joseph N. Tylenda is also well written, and I recommend you purchase both books and compare the two to one another. Keep the Tylenda book for its preface and introduction, and keep this one for the clearer, easier-to-understand content (a matter of taste, which is why you should buy both). This book is small, durable, compact in size and content, and has excellent quality paper. It is also among the least expensive, which has no relationship to its quality; paying more does not necessarily equate to being superior in quality. In my opinion, after comparing, you will buy multiple copies of this compact, maroon book for all your close friends as gifts.
Borg-mx5 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A profound meditation on the interior life and sin.
seoulful on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Although written in the 15th century to a mainly monastic audience, The Imitation of Christ has great relevance for anyone today seeking a deeper spiritual life. His counsels are not easy to read and apply to one's life for his basic premise is dying to self which he explains with great clarity lest anyone should be slow to understand. Thomas a Kempis speaks as one who has struggled mightily with his own passions and demons, "The war against our vices and passions is harder than any physical toil; and whoever fails to overcome his lesser faults will gradually fall into greater. Your evenings will always be tranquil if you have spent the day well. Watch yourself, bestir yourself, admonish yourself and whatever others may do, never neglect your own soul. The stricter you are with yourself, the greater is your spiritual progress." These are not the words that people in any age are interested in hearing and yet he continues to draw large audiences more than five centuries later. There is a power in his writing because he has put into practice the difficult words of Jesus and thereby achieved a position of authority to teach others.
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
A Classic. An essential read for any devout Christian wanting to enhance their devotion to Our Lord Jesus Christ.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago