Going to the Source, Volume I: To 1877: The Bedford Reader in American History

Going to the Source, Volume I: To 1877: The Bedford Reader in American History

by Victoria Bissell Brown, Timothy J. Shannon

Paperback(Fifth Edition)

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Overview

Many document readers offer lots of sources, but only Going to the Source combines a rich selection of primary sources with in-depth instructions for how to use each type of source. Mirroring the chronology of the U.S. history survey, each chapter familiarizes students with a single type of source while focusing on an intriguing historical episode such as the Cherokee Removal or the 1894 Pullman Strike. Students practice working with a diverse range of source types including photographs, diaries, oral histories, speeches, advertisements, political cartoons, and more. A capstone chapter in each volume prompts students to synthesize information on a single topic from a variety of source types. The wide range of topics and sources across 28 chapters provides students with all they need to become fully engaged with America’s history.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781319105976
Publisher: Bedford/St. Martin's
Publication date: 09/20/2019
Edition description: Fifth Edition
Pages: 400
Product dimensions: 7.34(w) x 9.36(h) x 0.50(d)

About the Author

Victoria Bissell Brown is the L.F. Parker Professor of History at Grinnell College, where she teaches Modern U.S. History, U.S. Women’s History, and U.S. Immigration History. She is the author of The Education of Jane Addams and the editor of the Bedford/St. Martin’s edition of Jane Addams’s Twenty Years at Hull-House. Her articles have appeared in Feminist Studies, The Journal of Women’s History, and The Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society. She has served as a Book Review Editor for The Journal of the Gilded Age and Progressive Era and for the Women and Social Movements website.
 
Timothy J. Shannon is professor of History at Gettysburg College, where he teaches Early American and Native American History. His other books include Iroquois Diplomacy on the Early American Frontier, Atlantic Lives: A Comparative Approach to Early America, and Indians and Colonists at the Crossroads of Empire: The Albany Congress of 1754, which received the Dixon Ryan Fox Prize from the New York State Historical Association and the Distinguished Book Award from the Society of Colonial Wars. His articles have appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly, Ethnohistory, and the New England Quarterly, and he has been a research fellow at the Huntington Library and John Carter Brown Library.

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: Historians and Their Sources


1 Monsters and Marvels: Images of Animals from the New World

Using the Source: Images of Animals

What Can Images of Animals Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Images

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Images of Animals from the New World


1. Succarath

2. Hoga [Manatee]

3. Whale

4. Alligator

5. Llama

6. Birds and Fish of New England

7. Animals of the Carolinas

8. Beaver

9. The Vampire, or Spectre of Guiana [ Vampire Bat]

10. The Aboma Snake [Anaconda]

Analyzing Images of Animals

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

2 Tales of Captivity and Redemption: North American Captivity Narratives

Using the Source: Captivity Narratives

What Can Captivity Narratives Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Captivity Narratives

Source Analysis Table

The Source: North American Captivity Narratives


1. Alvar Nuñez Cabeza de Vaca, 1542

2. Father Isaac Jogues, S.J., 1647

3. Mary Rowlandson, 1682

Analyzing Captivity Narratives

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

3 Colonial America’s Most Wanted: Runaway Advertisements in Colonial Newspapers 00

Using the Source: Runaway Advertisements

What Can Runaway Advertisements Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Print Advertisements

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Runaway Advertisements in Colonial Newspapers, 1747–1770

NEW ENGLAND


1. Boston Evening-Post, August 1, 1748

2. Boston Evening-Post, May 19, 1755

3. Boston Evening-Post, March 29, 1762

MIDDLE COLONIES


4. Pennsylvania Gazette, November 26, 1747

5. Pennsylvania Gazette, July 8, 1756

6. Pennsylvania Gazette, July 22, 1756

7. Pennsylvania Gazette, August 11, 1757

8. Pennsylvania Gazette, November 29, 1764

CHESAPEAKE


9. Virginia Gazette, April 11, 1766

10. Virginia Gazette, April 25, 1766

11. Virginia Gazette, August 10, 1769

12. Virginia Gazette, May 31, 1770

LOWER SOUTH


13. Georgia Gazette, May 26, 1763

14. Georgia Gazette, March 7, 1765

15. Georgia Gazette, January 14, 1767

16. Georgia Gazette, August 31, 1768

Analyzing Runaway Advertisements

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

4 Experiencing the New Birth: Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs from the Great Awakening

Using the Source: Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs

What Can Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs from The Great Awakening, 1742–1785


1. Nathan Cole’s Memoir, 1765

2. Hannah Heatons’ Diary, 1750s

3. John Marrant’s Memoir, 1785

4. Nicholas Gilman’s Diary, 1742

5. Joseph Fish’s Diary, 1773

6. Charles Woodmason’s Journal, 1768

Analyzing Diaries, Journals, and Memoirs

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

5 The Sound of Rebellion: Songs in Revolutionary America

Using the Source: Songs

What Can Songs Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Songs

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Songs in Revolutionary America, 1767–1781


1. "To the Ladies"

2. "The Liberty Song"

3. "The Parody"

4. "The Rebels"

5. "The New Recruit / Fare Thee Well, Ye Sweethearts"

6. "How Stands the Glass Around"

7. "The Epilogue"

8. "Volunteer Boys"

9. "To the Traitor Arnold"

10. "The Dance"

Analyzing Songs

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

6 Debating the Constitution: Speeches from the New York Ratification Convention

Using the Source: The Ratification Debates

What Can the Ratification Debates Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Political Debates

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Speeches Debating the Constitution from the New York Ratification Convention, June 21–28, 1788

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS


1. Melancton Smith, June 21, 1788

2. Alexander Hamilton, June 21, 1788

3. Melancton Smith, June 21, 1788

SOURCES OF CORRUPTION


4. Robert R. Livingston, June 23, 1788

5. Melancton Smith, June 23, 1788

THE CONSTITUTION’S EFFECT ON THE STATES


6. Melancton Smith, June 27, 1788

7. Alexander Hamilton, June 28, 1788

Analyzing the Ratification Debates

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

7 The Question of Female Citizenship: Court Records from the New Nation

Using the Source: Court Records

What Can Court Records Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Court Records

Source Analysis Table

The Source: James Martin (Plaintiff in Error) v. The Commonwealth and William Bosson and Other Ter-tenants, 1805

THE LAWYERS’ ARGUMENTS


1. The Fourth Error Identified by James Martin’s Attorneys in Their Appeal

2. George Blake, Attorney for James Martin

3. Daniel Davis, Solicitor General for Massachusetts

4. James Sullivan, Attorney General for Massachusetts

5. Theophilus Parsons, Attorney for James Martin

THE JUSTICES’ OPINIONS


6. Justice Theodore Sedgwick

7. Justice Simeon Strong

8. Chief Justice Francis Dana

Analyzing Court Records

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

8 Family Values: Advice Literature for Parents and Children in the Early Republic 000

Using the Source: Advice Literature for Parents and Children

What Can Advice Literature Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Advice Literature

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Advice Literature on Child Rearing and Children’s Literature, 1807–1833

ADVICE LITERATURE ON CHILD REARING


1. The Mother at Home by John S. C. Abbott, 1833

2. The Mother’s Book by Lydia Maria Child, 1831

CHILDREN’S LITERATURE


3. The New-England Primer, 1807

4. The Busy Bee, 1831

5. The Life of George Washington, 1832

Analyzing Advice Literature

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

9 The Meaning of Cherokee Civilization: Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal

Using the Source: Newspaper Editorials

What Can Newspaper Editorials Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Newspaper Editorials

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal

ELIAS BOUDINOT, EDITORIALS FROM THE CHEROKEE PHOENIX (1828–1831) 000


1. February 21, 1828

2. January 21, 1829

3. January 28, 1829

4. February 18, 1829

5. April 21, 1830

6. November 12, 1831

JEREMIAH EVARTS, "WILLIAM PENN LETTERS" (1829)


7. From Letter I

8. From Letter II

9. From Letter V

10. From Letter XV

11. From Letter XXIV

Analyzing Newspaper Editorials about Indian Removal

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

10 Challenging the "Peculiar Institution": Slave Narratives from the Antebellum South

Using the Source: Slave Narratives

What Can Slave Narratives Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Slave Narratives

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Antebellum Slave Narratives


1. Henry Bibb, Narrative of the Life and Adventures of Henry Bibb, An American Slave, Written by Himself, 1849

2. Solomon Northup, Twelve Years A Slave, 1853

3. Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl. Written by Herself, 1861

Analyzing Slave Narratives

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

11 Martyr or Madman Biographies of John Brown

Using the Source: Biographies of John Brown

What Can Biographies Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Biographies

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Biographies of John Brown


1. John Brown by W. E. B. Du Bois, 1909

2. John Brown by Robert Penn Warren, 1929

3. John Brown, Abolitionist by David S. Reynolds, 2005

Analyzing Biographies

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

12 The Illustrated Civil War: Photography on the Battlefield

Using the Source: Civil War Photographs

What Can Civil War Photographs Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Photographs

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Photographs of Civil War Battlefields and Military Life, 1861–1866

MILITARY PORTRAITS


1. "Lieut. Washington, a Confederate Prisoner, and Capt. Custer, U.S.A.," James F. Gibson, 1862

2. "Gen. Robert B. Potter and Staff of Seven, Recognized Capt. Gilbert H. McKibben, Capt. Wright, A.A.G. Also Mr. Brady, Photographer," Mathew Brady, c. 1863

3. "Portrait of a Soldier Group," photographer unknown, c. 1861–1865

4. "President Lincoln on Battle-Field of Antietam," Alexander Gardner, 1862

BATTLEFIELD LANDSCAPES AND CITYSCAPES


5. "Pennsylvania, Gettysburg 07 / 1863," Timothy O’Sullivan, 1863

6. "Ruins of Charleston, S.C.," George P. Barnard, 1866

AFRICAN AMERICANS IN MILITARY LIFE


7. "Portrait of Brig. Gen. Napoleon B. McLaughlin, Officer of the Federal Army, and Staff, Vicinity of Washington, D.C.," Mathew Brady, 1861

8. "Culpeper, Va. ‘Contrabands,’ " Timothy O’Sullivan, 1863

9. "African American Soldiers with Their Teachers and Officers," photographer and date unknown

BATTLEFIELD DEAD


10. "Antietam, Md. Bodies of Dead Gathered for Burial," Alexander Gardner, 1862

11. "A Contrast. Federal Buried; Confederate Unburied, Where They Fell on the Battle Field of Antietam," Alexander Gardner, 1862

12. "He Sleeps His Last Sleep," Alexander Gardner, 1862

13. "Battlefield of Gettysburg — Body of a Soldier in ‘the Wheat Field,’ Evidently Killed by the Explosion of a Shell," James F. Gibson, 1863

14. "Field Where General Reynolds Fell, Gettysburg," Timothy O’Sullivan, 1863

15. " . . . View of the Covered Ways inside the Rebel Fort Mahone, Called by the Soldiers ‘Fort Damnation’ . . . Taken the Morning after the Storming of Petersburgh, Va. 1865," T. C. Roche, 1865

16. "Cold Harbor, Va. African Americans Collecting Bones of Soldiers Killed in Battle," John Reekie, 1865

Analyzing Civil War Photographs

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

13 Political Terrorism during Reconstruction: Congressional Hearings and Reports on the Ku Klux Klan 000

Using the Source: Congressional Hearings and Reports

What Can Congressional Hearings and Reports Tell Us

checklist: Interrogating Congressional Hearings and Reports

Source Analysis Table

The Source: Testimony and Reports from the Joint Select Committee to Inquire into the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States

WITNESS TESTIMONY


1. Testimony of Samuel T. Poinier, Washington, D.C., June 7, 1871

2. Testimony of D. H. Chamberlain, Washington, D.C., June 10, 1871

3. Testimony of Elias Thomson, Spartanburg, South Carolina, July 7, 1871

4. Testimony of Lucy McMillan, Spartanburg, South Carolina, July 10, 1871

5. Testimony of Mervin Givens, Spartanburg, South Carolina, July 12, 1871

COMMITTEE REPORTS


6. Majority Report of the Joint Select Committee to Inquire into the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States, February 19, 1872, Submitted by Luke P. Poland

7. Minority Report of the Joint Select Committee to Inquire into the Condition of Affairs in the Late Insurrectionary States, February 19, 1872, Submitted by James B. Beck

Analyzing Congressional Hearings and Reports

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

CAPSTONE Coming Together and Pulling Apart: Nineteenth-Century Fourth of July Observations

Using Multiple Source Types on Fourth of July Observations

What Can Multiple Source Types Tell Us

Source Analysis Table

The Sources: Documents and Images Portraying Fourth of July Observations, 1819–1903


1. Declaration of Independence, July 4, 1776, Painting. John Trumbull, 1819

2. Independence Day in Center Square, Painting. John Lewis Krimmel, 1819

3. "Adams and Jefferson," Speech. Daniel Webster, August 2, 1826

4. "Declaration of Rights of the Trades’ Union of Boston and Vicinity," 1834

5. Excerpt from Diary in America, with Remarks on Its Institutions, Memoir. Frederick Marryat, 1837

6. "Declaration of Sentiments," from the Woman’s Rights Convention, 1848

7. "What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?" Speech. Frederick Douglass, July 5, 1852

8. Speech, John Wannuaucon Quinney, July 4, 1854

9. Excerpts from A Philadelphia Perspective: The Diary of Sidney George Fisher Covering the Years 1834–1871, Diary. Sidney George Fisher, 1864, 1866

10. Excerpt from The Fire of Liberty in Their Hearts: The Diary of Jacob E. Yoder of the Freedman’s Bureau School, Lynchburg, Virginia, 1866–1870, Diary. Jacob E. Yoder, 1866

11. Fire-Works on the Night of the Fourth of July, Cartoon. Winslow Homer, 1868

12. The Fourth of July in the Country, Cartoon. Thomas Worth, 1868

13. The Freed Slave in Memorial Hall, Engraving. Fernando Miranda, 1876

15. 4. July. 1903, Drawing. Amos Bad Heart Bull, 1903

Analyzing Sources on Fourth of July Observations

The Rest of the Story

To Find Out More

APPENDIX I: Avoiding Plagiarism: Acknowledging the Source

APPENDIX II: Documenting the Source

INDEX

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