ISBN-10:
1555914985
ISBN-13:
9781555914981
Pub. Date:
09/09/2003
Publisher:
Fulcrum Publishing
God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, 30th Anniversary Edition / Edition 30

God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, 30th Anniversary Edition / Edition 30

Current price is , Original price is $24.95. You

Temporarily Out of Stock Online

Please check back later for updated availability.

Overview


First published in 1972, Vine Deloria Jr.'s God Is Red remains the seminal work on Native religious views, asking new questions about our species and our ultimate fate. Celebrating three decades in publication with a special 30th-anniversary edition, this classic work reminds us to learn "that we are a part of nature, not a transcendent species with no responsibilities to the natural world." It is time again to listen to Vine Deloria Jr.'s powerful voice, telling us about religious life that is independent of Christianity and that reveres the interconnectedness of all living things.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781555914981
Publisher: Fulcrum Publishing
Publication date: 09/09/2003
Edition description: Thirtieth Edition, 30th Anniversary Edition
Pages: 344
Sales rank: 226,709
Product dimensions: 6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 1.20(d)
Age Range: 9 Years

About the Author


Vine Deloria Jr. was named by TIME magazine as one of the greatest religious thinkers of the twentieth century. He was a leading Native American scholar whose research, writings, and teachings on history, law, religion, and political science have not only changed the face of Indian country, but stand to influence future generations of Native and non-Native Americans alike. He has authored many acclaimed books, including Evolution, Creationism, and Other Modern Myths; Red Earth, White Lies; God is Red; Spirit and Reason and Custer Died for Your Sins. Vine Deloria Jr. passed away on November 13, 2005.

Table of Contents

Forewordvii
Forewordxi
Introductionxv
Chapter 1The Indian Movement1
Chapter 2The Indians of the American Imagination23
Chapter 3The Religious Challenge45
Chapter 4Thinking in Time and Space61
Chapter 5The Problem of Creation77
Chapter 6The Concept of History97
Chapter 7The Spatial Problem of History113
Chapter 8Origin of Religion133
Chapter 9Natural and Hybrid Peoples149
Chapter 10Death and Religion165
Chapter 11Human Personality185
Chapter 12The Group203
Chapter 13Christianity and Contemporary American Culture219
Chapter 14Tribal Religions and Contemporary American Culture237
Chapter 15The Aboriginal World and Christian History257
Chapter 16Sacred Places and Moral Responsibility271
Chapter 17Religion Today287
Appendices297
Bibliography307
Index313

What People are Saying About This

"Deloria's thinking on the subject of religion has lost none of its rage or relevance...since God is Red was first published. This book is broader than its subtitle suggests. It is a trenchant and often witty critique on non-Native religion through Native eyes." — Awkekon Journal

"Deloria's handling of the contrast between Christianity and the naturalistic religion of the American Indians is rich in perceptiveness." — Choice

"Vine Deloria, Jr. could be one of the most important living Native American writers, and insofar as there can be any hope of human survival in the face of civilization's insane onslaught, one of the most important writers ever to exist." — The Bloomsbury Review

"The flagship book on Native American spirituality remains Vine Deloria's God is Red. He does an outstanding job of translating complex spiritual issues into very simple truths." — Wilma P. Mankiller, Former Principal Chief, Cherokee Nation

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

God Is Red: A Native View of Religion, 30th Anniversary Edition 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a great book for anyone wanting to know more about Native American Spirituality. This is great for someone who wants to see treatment of Native Americans their eyes from our government, who claim they have done everything in the name of peace and equality.
KendraRenee on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A thought-provoking book that provides some good insight into Native Indian perspectives and opinions. However, I don't like his double-standard of Christianity and native religions--that Native religions CAN=culture, while it's a failure of Christianity if IT doesn't reflect culture? He also accuses many non-Indians of idealizing about historical Indian society, but then he does the very same thing!! In talking about Native American religion, he waxes romantic about how things used to be, even though, now, their religious communities have deteriorated too. Thirdly, he maintains that whites, or non-Indians, can't understand what it's like to feel tied to the land ... but many families in the U.S. DO stay in one place, DO feel very connected to, responsible for, and connected with the land they've lived on for generations. To keep this short, he's guilty of the same ego-centrism and nostalgia that he criticizes Christians for.Not that I'm Christian. In fact, I liked his critique of American Christian society, I truly did. He was right on target, obviously knows what he's talking about. I wish more people would read this book who needed to--I didn't.
LivelyLady on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
It helped that I read this while visiting the west and native American cultural centers! Great explanation of native American spirituality, how they believe you cannot have a religion without a shared culture. Gives understanding and credibility to the Mormons and the Jewish cultures. Also describes their religion as circular as opposed to vertical as Christianity is. I would love to have read this for discussion.
juglicerr on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a great book when Deloria is actually talking about Native American religion. Unfortunately, he chooses to spend a fair amount of time on other hobby horses, like the controversy about Velikovsky. One might want to read the first part and skip the rest.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago