The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789

The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789

by Robert Middlekauff

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Overview

The first book to appear in the illustrious Oxford History of the United States, this critically acclaimed volume--a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize--offers an unsurpassed history of the Revolutionary War and the birth of the American republic. Beginning with the French and Indian War and continuing to the election of George Washington as first president, Robert Middlekauff offers a panoramic history of the conflict between England and America, highlighting the drama and anguish of the colonial struggle for independence. Combining the political and the personal, he provides a compelling account of the key events that precipitated the war, from the Stamp Act to the Tea Act, tracing the gradual gathering of American resistance that culminated in the Boston Tea Party and "the shot heard 'round the world." The heart of the book features a vivid description of the eight-year-long war, with gripping accounts of battles and campaigns, ranging from Bunker Hill and Washington's crossing of the Delaware to the brilliant victory at Hannah's Cowpens and the final triumph at Yorktown, paying particular attention to what made men fight in these bloody encounters. The book concludes with an insightful look at the making of the Constitution in the Philadelphia Convention of 1787 and the struggle over ratification. Through it all, Middlekauff gives the reader a vivid sense of how the colonists saw these events and the importance they gave to them. Common soldiers and great generals, Sons of Liberty and African slaves, town committee-men and representatives in congress--all receive their due. And there are particularly insightful portraits of such figures as Sam and John Adams, James Otis, Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, and many others. This new edition has been revised and expanded, with fresh coverage of topics such as mob reactions to British measures before the War, military medicine, women's role in the Revolution, American Indians, the different kinds of war fought by the Americans and the British, and the ratification of the Constitution. The book also has a new epilogue and an updated bibliography. The cause for which the colonists fought, liberty and independence, was glorious indeed. Here is an equally glorious narrative of an event that changed the world, capturing the profound and passionate struggle to found a free nation. The Oxford History of the United States The Oxford History of the United States is the most respected multi-volume history of our nation. The series includes three Pulitzer Prize winners, a New York Times bestseller, and winners of the Bancroft and Parkman Prizes. The Atlantic Monthly has praised it as "the most distinguished series in American historical scholarship," a series that "synthesizes a generation's worth of historical inquiry and knowledge into one literally state-of-the-art book." Conceived under the general editorship of C. Vann Woodward and Richard Hofstadter, and now under the editorship of David M. Kennedy, this renowned series blends social, political, economic, cultural, diplomatic, and military history into coherent and vividly written narrative.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780199740925
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Publication date: 03/09/2007
Series: Oxford History of the United States Series
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 752
Sales rank: 139,912
File size: 13 MB
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About the Author

Robert Middlekauff is Preston Hotchkis Professor of American History Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. The winner of a Bancroft Prize for The Mathers, he was Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford University and also served as Director of the Huntington Library, Art Gallery, and Botanical Gardens.

Table of Contents

Maps Editor's Introduction Porlogue: The Sustaining Truths 1. The Obstructed Giant 2. The Children of the Twice-Born 3. Beginnings: From the Top Down 4. The Stamp Act Crisis 5. Response 6. Selden's Penny 7. Chance and Charles Townshend 8. Boston Takes the Lead 9. The "Bastards of England" 10. Drift 11. Resolution 12. War 13. "Half a War" 14. Independence 15. The War of Posts 16. The War of Maneuver 17. The Revolution Becomes a European War 18. The War in the South 19. The "Fugitive War" 20. Inside the Campaigns 21. Outside the Campaigns 22. Yorktown and Paris 23. The Constitutional Movement 24. The Children of the Twice-Born in the 1780s 25. The Constitutional Convention 26. Ratification: An End and a Beginning Epilogue

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Glorious Cause 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
'The Glorious Cause' provides ample history that leads up to the Revolution, just as any book on the subject should. Mr. Middlekauff presents this history in breathtaking detail that is exciting and fresh. Without mincing words, his unbiased writing will give the reader a comprehensive understanding of the attitudes on both sides of the Atlantic; not only in England, but also France and Spain and all the players involved in our independence. Mr. Middlekauff delves brilliantly into the attitudes of the Americans who did not believe in the fight against England and how our founding fathers fought to change those attitudes. This exquisitely researched and superbly written book provides intimate insight regarding George Washington, John Hancock, Samual Adams, Charles Cornwallis, Thomas Gage and a multitude of other players, both famous and not so famous. This is first-rate work that belongs in every school and one that is the torch bearer of how history so should be unbiasly written and presented.
BACarvalho More than 1 year ago
An intriguing and in-depth look at the most critical point in the development of our great republic. A must read for students of the formation of the United States and Revolutionary War buffs alike.
Guest More than 1 year ago
The Glorious Cause. I like the title because it explains in detail about the American Revolution. Robert Middlekauff has a way to say what he wants to say and not make it dry and boring. The book is very well detailed and at the same time you can still read it and understand it. I really recommend this book for people who want to learn about The American Revolution you will enjoy this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is the first in the Oxford History of the United Stees The author begins the studr of the Revolutionary period at the closo of the French and IndiaWar He ends it with the ratification of the US Constitution He also studies British history to gain an understandiing on theories used by colonial leaders to justify their opposition to British rule I thoght this to be a very entertaing and I gained a greater undertsanding of this pivotal period in human history
patito-de-hule on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One volume of the Oxford History of the United States, this book covers the American Revolution from the end of the French and Indian War to the ratification of the Constitution. It is informative, though some will find it skimpy on details of strategy in the War of Rebellion. I, for one, think the important thing in the period is the evolution of ideas and how the patriots went about putting those ideas in practice. We see here how the ideas developed and became very general during those sixteen years.
bexaplex on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I found this book and Middlekauff's description of narrative history odd, but perhaps I've been tainted by reading too many academic books. There is little discussion of source material other than secondary sources (I routinely glanced at the bottom of the page only to encounter a recommendation for a book published in the 30s), and it seems doubtful that your average reader would reach for a 700+ page book on the American Revolution for a little recreation. I certainly got some incredulous looks as I toted it around for a few weeks. However, the story of the revolution is pretty compelling stuff, and Middlekauff dexterously handles the personal (both famous characters and ordinary soldiers, patriots and loyalists) and the tide of history. If you've got a few volumes of Bruce Catton, you'll love this book.A few minor irritations: typos scattered about (don't publishers employ copy editors any more?), the tacked-on chapter about women, Indians and slaves (leaving it out would have made it less obvious that our traditional story of the birth of the United States is completely dead-white-male-focused), and the phrase "to be sure," which sounds dismissive and unintelligent. Witness this waste of space: "In a sense no one in America escaped the war, even those in areas remote from it. To be sure much went on as usual... Yet the war could not be forgotten." [p. 650] In what sense? How sure are you?
wildbill on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the first volume of the Oxford History of the United States. There is much that I liked about this book but I also feel it had some serious shortcomings.My favorite part of the book was the section dealing with the events leading up to the Revolution. The author does a very good job of setting forth the positions of the British and the Americans. His analysis of the British political situation that led to the Acts which incited the Revolution was excellent. That section also showed clearly how the conflict between the parties escalated as the British sought to impose their authority on the colonies and the Americans reacted. The American reaction would lead to stronger actions by the British which then incited more aggressive actions by the Americans. The Boston Tea Party led to the British closing the port of Boston and shortly thereafter the war began.The section on the war itself was also well done. I gained a good understanding of the role of Washington and how he grew into his position as the war progressed. On the British side the author pointed out how the lack of real direction from London and the squabbling of the military leadership hampered coordinated activity by the British.I think it was a mistake to try to fit the Constitutional Convention and the ratification into this book. This process is covered in forty pages and while the author did provide some insights his narrative did not do justice to the events.The book relied on secondary sources to a large degree. This book was published in 1982 and cited many sources from the 1930's forward. This is not what I would expect in a book that attempts to be the authoritative source on the subjects covered. The author is relying on the opinions of other historians where in my opinion his analysis of the primary sources would provide greater credibility to his conclusions. If this book were the author's dissertation I doubt he would not have received his Ph. D. There has been a revised, expanded edition of the book published that may have addressed this situation. I will try to find a copy and see what changes were made.This year I have read two other volumes from this series, Battle Cry of Freedom and What Hath God Wrought. I thought that both of those books were much better than this volume. I have the next volume in the series Empire of Liberty:A History of the Early Republic, 1789-1815 (touchstone where are you?) I plan to read it next and hope that it will be better than this volume.I cannot recommend this book. I was disappointed. The book has too many problems and as of now is a bit dated. I would guess that the series has changed editors since this volume was published.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is packed with facts but written in an academic format that makes for much less than a page turner. Normally able to blaze through books on similar topics in days this remains three quarters finished due to a grinding effort. In short a great topic written about in a mundane fashion that leaves me looking for an alternate source on the subject.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a rather dense--meaning chock full if information--but well written tome.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
Tremendous book detailing the men and actions that caused the colonies to become the United States. The author details the legislation passed by the British Parliament that ulitmately resulted in Boston exploding into open rebellion. This is a great book that covers all the men you have heard about in American history. Samuel Adams was the spark and the Sons of Liberty was the fuel... together, look out! Clear progression of the time period and also allows the reader to see how unorganized Britain was dealing with America. A lengthy book but worth your time.