From Score To Screen

From Score To Screen

by Sonny Kompanek

Paperback

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Overview

Scoring for film has changed dramatically over the past twenty years. With the advent of MIDI, sequencers and low-cost recording gear, just about any composer anywhere can score a film. Well-known composer Sonny Kompanek teaches this new film scoring process at prestigious New York University and now he shares his secrets within the pages of From Score to Screen. Learn about the cast of professionals you'll work with as a film composer. Find out how to meet people in the business, network, and create a promotional demo. Learn how to compose themes and battle writers' block. Understand how to preview a score with the director and manage requested changes. And know how to make a director happy with your work. With this book, you'll gain practical knowledge that you can put into action immediately.

SELLING POINTS:
This is the only book that discusses the new film scoring process which utilizes the latest technology.

Written by revered film composer, Sonny Kompanek.

Ideal for any composer interested in film music, from beginner to advanced.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780825673085
Publisher: Omnibus Press
Publication date: 09/01/2004
Pages: 196
Product dimensions: 0.42(w) x 7.00(h) x 10.00(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgmentsviii
About the Authorix
Forewordxi
Introductionxv
1The Cast1
The Composer2
The Orchestrator4
The Conductor7
The Musicians7
The Director8
The Music Editor10
The Mixer11
The Contractor13
The Music Copyist14
The Studio Executives16
2Getting Started19
Meeting People in the Business21
Success Stories22
Networking on the Net23
Promotional Demos23
What To Do With Your Demo25
Agents26
3Composition29
Trust Your Instincts29
Listen to the Silence30
Themes30
Harmonic Language31
Writer's Block32
Musical Baggage33
How Much to Write33
Less is Better35
Sequencer Short-Comings36
To Click or Not to Click37
Orchestrators38
"Mr. Mockup"39
4From Midi to Live Orchestra43
The Midi Orchestra44
Choosing Your Midi Orchestra44
Why Midi Files Look So Strange46
Quantizing46
Import Filtering47
Tapping-in Beats47
Too Many Tracks?48
Standard Midi File Format49
Midi Can Do the "Impossible"50
What Midi Cannot Do52
5Orchestration57
Color58
Picking the Band59
Using Your Sequencer at the Session60
Unusual Instruments61
Slurs and String Bowings61
Clefs and Transposing Instruments62
Printed Scores63
Modulations64
Tempo Changes64
Synth Pitfalls64
Big Sound, Small Band65
6Conducting67
Know the Film69
Communicating With the Director69
Planning the Recording Order70
About Batons70
Prepare the Orchestra Before Playing71
Headsets71
Prepare the Percussion72
Player Lists72
Mistakes Along the Way72
A Problem in the Booth73
7Fix It75
It Doesn't Work76
Changes at the Recording Session77
The Music Sounds Too Big77
Thinning the Orchestra78
The Music Sounds Too Small78
Quickly Fixing Wrong Notes80
Correcting Balance By Overdubbing81
Dialog82
Use Rhythm Section for Quick Changes84
Fixing Difficult Ensemble Rhythms84
Fixing Sync Points With the Film85
Fixes After the Session85
Contemporary Techniques as Coloristic Effects86
Fixing the Film87
8Recording89
Choosing the Right Mixer90
Where to Record92
The Studio Assistants92
Recording Order of Cues93
Percussion93
Overdubbing94
Vocals and Solo Instruments94
Synth Pre-records95
9Score and Parts97
Basics98
Printing the Score100
Chord Symbols102
Transposed vs. Concert Scores102
Meter and Key Signatures103
Accidentals103
Proofing Parts104
PDF Scores104
Copies of Scores for the Session104
Percussion Parts105
Bowings and Slurs106
Changing Instruments107
Harp107
10Practice109
Film Schools109
Animation110
Friends in the Business110
Features With No Music110
Smpte Timecode111
Digitizing Video111
Making Your Own Digital Video111
Editing Pre-Existing Feature Films for Scoring112
11Study115
Recording Session as a Learning Experience115
Things to Test at a Recording Session116
What To Do If You Have No Access to Big Sessions117
Studying Film Scores119
Tension and Motion120
Other Elements121
Analyze an Entire Film Score121
Film Scoring Study Programs122
12Business123
What to Charge124
Clients125
Package Deals125
Contracts126
The Musician's Union128
Credits128
13Final Notes129
Ask Questions in Advance129
Assume Nothing129
Do Not Cut Corners130
Be Concise and Focused130
Have Opinions130
Take Your Time130
Be Calm and Courteous131
Be Prepared for Rejection131
Keep Moving131
It's All Good132
Resources133
Film / Music Schools133
Professional Societies and Organizations142
Suggested Scores to Study145
Suggested Reading147
Web Sites149
Glossary151
Index167

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