Free Fall

Free Fall

by David Wiesner

Paperback(Reprint)

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Overview

When he falls asleep with a book in his arms, a young boy dreams an amazing dream-about dragons, about castles, and about an unchartered, faraway land. And you can come along.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780688109905
Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date: 09/18/1991
Edition description: Reprint
Pages: 32
Sales rank: 368,859
Product dimensions: 10.06(w) x 10.92(h) x 0.17(d)
Age Range: 4 - 8 Years

About the Author

David Wiesner has been awarded the Caldecott Medal three times, for Flotsam in 2007, The Three Pigs in 2002, and Tuesday in 1992. He has received the Caldecott Honor twice, for Sector 7 in 2000 and Free Fall in 1989. Free Fall is the first title he both authored and illustrated. His cover art now graces The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Among many other accolades, David has been nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.


David Wiesner has been awarded the Caldecott Medal three times, for Flotsam in 2007, The Three Pigs in 2002, and Tuesday in 1992. He has received the Caldecott Honor twice, for Sector 7 in 2000 and Free Fall in 1989. Free Fall is the first title he both authored and illustrated. His cover art now graces The Chronicles of Narnia by C. S. Lewis. Among many other accolades, David has been nominated for the Hans Christian Andersen Award.

Hometown:

Outside Philadelphia, P.A.

Date of Birth:

February 5, 1956

Place of Birth:

Bridgewater, NJ

Education:

Rhode Island School of Design -- BFA in Illustration.

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Free Fall 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 11 reviews.
TheMightyQuinn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
While reading a book, a little boy falls asleep, the rest of the pages depict his dreaming until he wakes up the next morning. This book is a wordless picture book, but it maintains a story line through the pictures. The main, in between pages, of the story are all double-page spreads including portions of the boy's dream sequence and contain clues to the next segment blended into the upper right hand corner of the image. The starting page and the last page contain little details that appeared throughout the dream. Pictures were very precise and detailed (and beautiful!). Excellent addition to any picture book collection.
baachan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Wiesner's Free Fall depicts the story--there's no "telling," per se, since the book uses wordless pictures--of a boy who falls asleep while reading a book of maps. His dreams that night are especially vivid--he experiences some larger-than-life objects. When you reach the end of the story, you see where all these objects have come from. The watercolors were beautiful, and the story really pulls together at the end when you find out where the objects have come from--without that final illustration spread, the story would feel extremely disjointed. But Wiesner pulls it off well. Recommended for purchase for all public and school library collections. The illustrations for the breakfast scene are especially great. This was Wiesner's first book that he both wrote and illustrated. It's interesting to read this book, and then read his later works to see how his style has evolved over the years.
kikione on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A young boy falls asleep with a book filled with treasure in his hands. As he sleeps, he dreams. He dreams of kings, queens, knights, castles, dragons, and magical people and places. The scenes are surrealistic, and spark the imagination. Cornflakes turn into fish and leaves turn into swans. When he awakens in the morning you see many things sitting beside and around his bed that were a part of his fantastic dream. It would be fun to have students write words to go with this book. I bet you would get a lot of different kinds of stories.
crochetbunnii on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Personal Response:Like a dream influenced by different things in our lives, the plot shifts constantly, creating new and amazing images to spark the imagination. It's fun to follow this boy through his dreamland and guess what influences helped shaped the images he finds in his dreams.Curricular Connections:The images from this story are so varied and open to interpretation that I think it would be interesting to have children write stories for the characters and places depicted in the images. Children can also discuss places or stories that the images remind them of.Illustrations:The illustrations are all double-page images meant to depict the dream, more than carry a plot forward. Like dreams that everyone experiences, sometimes there isn't a clear-cut progression of the story and the illustrations reflect the melting of one dream into another. I really like the images of the books between the trees in the forest.Themes:Everyday items can unlock a world of wonder.
lpeal on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Free Fall is about a boy who goes to sleep and has a very vivid imagination. When he makes up in the morning he sees some of the things he dreamed about in his dream next to his bed. I feel that this is a book for all kids to look through. It shows how imagination can lead you anywhere.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being a wordless book, it relies completely on the illustrations to tell the story. While they were well done and flowed into the next page for transition, I found it to be really short. This did allow me to "re-read" it several times, thus bettering the experience. If not for going over them again, it would have been much worse due to my quick glancing thru.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a Caldecott Honor Book in 1989. It would be appropriate for children ages 5-12. This is a very entertaining story that captures your imagination. Throughout this story you follow a little boy through his dreams to find out where he will end up. I really liked this story. I think that it would keep a child¿s attention throughout the entire story. This was the first book that David Wiesner wrote. His book Tuesday was a Caldecott Award winner in 1992. He was born and raised in New Jersey and graduated from Rhode Island School of Design with a BFA in Illustration. He now lives in Brooklyn with his wife Kim, where he devotes full time to illustration and she pursues
Guest More than 1 year ago
Free Fall is a Caldecott Honor Book. Set Back and let your imagination run free. Follow the little boy through his dreams to find out where he will end up. As you flip through the pages of this book you will find something very interesting. This book would be good for grades k-12. I really like this book. You could use it to create your own story. It would be great to use as a story starter. This is a realistic book. This book is by David Wiesner. Wiesner was born and raised in Bridgewater, New Jersey. Him and his wife live in Brooklyn where she is pursuing her career as a surgeon. Wiesner, David. Free Fall. New York: Lothrop, Lee & Shephard Books, 1988.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read this book as a part of an illustrator analysis of David Wiesner for a children's literature course. I had never heard of Wiesner before, but I examined six of his most popular works, and now I'm hooked on his books! His creativity amazes me, and every time that I take another look at his books, I find something else in the illustrations that blows me away! Free Fall was a constant source of pleasure for me since I discovered something new every time that I opened the cover. This is an excellent wordless book to introduce children to (and so different from The Snowman, the traditional wordless book). If you have not discovered Wiesner yet, look into it and fall into ingenious world of humor, bizarreness, and amazement.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I am an adult and found this book in paperback in a used bookstore while looking for another book. I was hooked. The artwork is amazing and it is like a moving picture with things turning into other things as the dream proceeds. It is fun just to study the pictures. I agree it may be too much for a very young child, but an older child may find it intriguing, as did I.