Frankie and Johnny

Frankie and Johnny

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Overview

The ill-fated lovers Frankie and Johnny were already legends by 1930, the year of this illustrated drama's publication. The unique interpretation is a collaboration between John Huston, the future director of The Maltese Falcon and other film classics, and Miguel Covarrubias, an influential painter and caricaturist. Huston, who reputedly interviewed a neighbor of the real-life Frankie and Johnny, was inspired to adapt the tale of love gone wrong for a puppet show for which George Gershwin supplied musical accompaniment.
In addition to Huston's script and distinctive images by Covarrubias, this edition features the "Saint Louis Version" of the folktale, regarded as the most authentic version, as well as 20 variations on the story and song.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780486803449
Publisher: Dover Publications
Publication date: 01/23/2015
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 176
File size: 4 MB

About the Author

John Huston (1906–87) was a film director, screenwriter, author, and actor. He is best known for the screenplays and direction of such films as The Maltese Falcon, Key Largo, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, The African Queen, and many others.
Mexican artist Miguel Covarrubias (1904–57) was celebrated for his paintings and caricatures. His work appeared in The New Yorker and Vanity Fair, and his style influence many latter-day artists, including Al Hirschfeld.

Read an Excerpt

Frankie and Johnny


By John Huston, Miguel Covarrubias

Dover Publications, Inc.

Copyright © 2015 Dover Publications, Inc.
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-0-486-80344-9



CHAPTER 1

A barroom. Lila, a drunken chippy, and the Prizefighter are dancing. Johnny, the Madam, Nelly Bly, and the Piano Player look on. The Bartender is stacking glasses.


LILA

Dance me easy, Prizefighter. Don't wrassle me so, or I may slop over on ye.


MADAM

Now, Lila, do like the gent wants. Be merry, dearie.

to Prizefighter

Her tongue's a mite sharp, but she don't mean ye no harm.


LILA

Whoops,—ki-yi! The tide's a-risin'!

She falls. The Madam helps her to a chair.


MADAM

Do ye want a good smacking? to the others

Her stummick's upset, pore child.


LILA

shrieking

I got 'em. They're a-climbin' up under my dresses.


PRIZEFIGHTER

to the Bartender

Squirrel.


BARTENDER

A peg.


LILA

They're in under my skirts.


MADAM

slapping Lila*s ears

It'll clear her head.


PRIZEFIGHTER

to Bartender

The same.


BARTENDER

It ain't covered.


PRIZEFIGHTER

I laid down a dime.


BARTENDER

Put up your nickel or it's back in the vat.

Bartender and Prizefighter both grab for the glass. The Prizefighter seizes it from the Bartender who reaches for his mallet and brings it down on the Prizefighter's head. The Prizefighter sags to his knees.

The rat's swallered the glass.

Johnny goes to the bar, puts his arm around the Prizefighter and hoists him straight. Then, sliding his hand into the Prizefighter's pocket, he brings out some coins.


JOHNNY

His speech is impeded by his hare lip. to the unconscious Prizefighter, conversationally

Why yes, I will. That's more'n kind. What?—ain't that a little costly? But just as ye says.

to the Bartender

We're to have the best the house can offer. An' you can keep the change.

Johnny drains his own and the Prizefighter's glass, to the Prizefighter

What? What was that? He's a-puttin' suthin' over on us, ye says? Well, Mr. Barkeep, we'll stand none a that. We ain't buyin' hog wash.

The Prizefighter shows signs of reviving. Johnny nails him with his right and resumes his load. He drinks again.

to the Bartender

He says that is more like it, an' would ye please set out the bottle.

Johnny puts the bottle first to the Prizefighter's lips, then to his own.

Nelly Bly sidles to the bar.


NELLY

Ye looks beautiful in yer new suit, Johnny.


JOHNNY

discarding his victim

Well, I got the form for it. Wet yer whistle.


NELLY

They tells how Frankie paid one hunnerd dollars for it. You look wunnerful in it. Ye shows it off so good.


JOHNNY

I'd a-rather she'd a-given me the cash.


NELLY

I thought at the time I bet he'd rather had the coin. I says it was downright selfish a-dressin' him up 'cause she took pleasure lookin' at him an' him in need a the dough.


JOHNNY

Aye, I had use for it.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from Frankie and Johnny by John Huston, Miguel Covarrubias. Copyright © 2015 Dover Publications, Inc.. Excerpted by permission of Dover Publications, Inc..
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

Table of Contents

Contents

FRANKIE AND JOHNNY A Play by John Huston, 15,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT The St. Louis Version The Story of the St. Louis Version • 104, 93,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT The Other Versions, 113,
FRANCES SHE SHOT ALBERT, 115,
AMY AND ALBERT, 123,
FRANKIE, 127,
FRANKIE BAKER, 131,
LILLY, 136,
FRANKY, 142,
ALBERT, 145,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT, 147,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT, 149,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT, 153,
FRANKIE AND ALBERT, 157,
AMY AND ALBERT, 159,

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