Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said

by Philip K. Dick

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Overview

"Dick skillfully explores the psychological ramifications of this nightmare."—The New York Times Review of Books

Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said grapples with many of the themes Philip K. Dick is best known for— identity, altered reality, drug use, and dystopia—in a rollicking chase story that earned the novel the John W. Campbell Award and nominations for the Hugo and Nebula.

Jason Taverner—world-famous talk show host and man-about-town—wakes up one day to find that no one knows who he is—including the vast databases of the totalitarian government. And in a society where lack of identification is a crime, Taverner has no choice but to go on the run with a host of shady characters, including crooked cops and dealers of alien drugs. But do they know more than they are letting on? And just how can a person’s identity be erased overnight?

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780547724904
Publisher: HMH Books
Publication date: 07/17/2012
Sold by: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 240
Sales rank: 246,767
File size: 284 KB

About the Author

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned to deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably, Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall, Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

Over a writing career that spanned three decades, PHILIP K. DICK (1928–1982) published 36 science fiction novels and 121 short stories in which he explored the essence of what makes man human and the dangers of centralized power. Toward the end of his life, his work turned toward deeply personal, metaphysical questions concerning the nature of God. Eleven novels and short stories have been adapted to film, notably Blade Runner (based on Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Total Recall,Minority Report, and A Scanner Darkly. The recipient of critical acclaim and numerous awards throughout his career, Dick was inducted into the Science Fiction Hall of Fame in 2005, and in 2007 the Library of America published a selection of his novels in three volumes. His work has been translated into more than twenty-five languages.

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Flow My Tears, the Policeman Said 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 40 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Okay, I'm an avid PKD fan, and this is my number one favorite book by him, for several reasons. The characters are amazing, and the plot sticks in my mind like no other, but what urged me to read this book is the phenomenon behind it that I read about online. You can look it up yourself, but basically what happened was, 4 years after PKD wrote the book, he started meeting people with the same names as the people in this book, and unintentionally living out actual scenes from it, too. Weird? Of course, that's why we love PKD, isn't it? My favorite book from my favorite author, everyone should read it.
Xyon921 More than 1 year ago
Surprisingly ahead of its time, its not for everyone but I thought it was excellent. Its a quick read, but fans of the genre who are looking for something outside of the ordinary will enjoy the strangeness of this novel.
jnwelch on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a small gem from one of sci-fi's most accomplished and interesting writers, Philip K. Dick. Movies based on his books keep coming out, with Blade Runner being the most famous. A new Total Recall is being released this year, and others include Minority Report and Adjustment Bureau, the latter a favorite of my wife's and mine.OK, enough about movies, other than I could see Flow My Tears, The Policeman Said being filmed, too, if one squeam-inducing plot thread were changed.Jason Taverner is a genetically enhanced Six, top of the heap, and the host of a hugely popular TV show. He's also full of himself and a womanizer. Our world has become a police state, with tabs kept on every citizen and problematics sent to forced labor camps. When one of his abandoned trystees expresses her anger and injures him with an ugh-toss, he ends up waking up in a world that doesn't know him. His fame has disappeared. His identity is missing from all databanks. In a police state, he's a disaster waiting to happen. What to do?His quest to first acquire some identity so he can survive, and to eventually recover his own identity, connects him with some memorable characters. They include a 19 year old ID forger and police informant who craves his bod and may do him in, an old flame who likes to wax philosophical, and the whacko sister of a police captain who may be behind all that has happened.Dick is a good writer, with a great imagination. The police state is a convincing backdrop, and the storyline is irresistible: why is his reality so changed? Will he be able to regain his identity? Will he be betrayed, chewed up and spit out into a forced labor camp? Along the way we have characters engage in deep discussions about grief, love, life, death, and what exactly is reality. Written in the 70s, drugs play a role in opening eyes and also potentially destroying lives. A bit of disturbing societal racism at the beginning comes full circle at the end.The author does provide an occasional clunker, e.g. a character making a remark in "his doglike panting voice." But mainly the story zips along, packing a remarkable amount of ideas, developments and story into approximately 200 pages.I also learned a good Latin phrase from it: De gustibus non disputandum est. In matters of taste there's no dispute. This may not be your cuppa, but for those who are intrigued by this sort of thing, it's a cinematic trip with a master.
BlankReg on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the book I read that finally solidified my feeling that I don't like PKD. For one thing, I don't really enjoy the pathologically dystopian view in his stories where every human society seems not just corrupt but irredeemable to the core. However, I also realize this was the fashion in the mid '70s so, while it's not to my liking, I can take that part of it as n historical artifact. The thing that pushed me over the edge to disliking PKD entirely-- once I realized it was his style and not just in a few stories and novels-- can be summed up in one phrase: "Wall-to-wall exposition." Hardly a paragraph goes by when the reader is not preached at, spoken down to, or forced to listen to a boring character monologue which explains concepts, and forces the story points home with a tone that manages to be stilted, condescending, pretentious, and contrived all at once.But I made it through, so that's something.
dwfree on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I've never been a huge sci-fi or fantasy reader, but I do dig PKD. This is one of his best.
Pool_Boy on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Enjoyable read, but I honestly think the ending (prior to the epilogue) was kind of unnecessary. It's a quick read and you have to love the author's brevity.
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Absoluteky one of the books that become the myth of your life
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David Lipscomb More than 1 year ago
Tackles the funadamental issues of identity and makes you question what makes you who you are.
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