Flash for Freedom!

Flash for Freedom!

by George MacDonald Fraser

Paperback(Reissue)

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Overview

A game of cards leads Flashman from the jungle death-house of Dahomey to the slave state of Mississippi as he dabbles in the slave trade in Volume III of the "Flashman Papers". When Flashman was inveigled into a game of pontoon with Disraeli and Lord George Bentinck, he was making an unconscious choice about his own future - would it lie in the House of Commons or the West African slave trade? Was there, for that matter, very much difference? Once again Flashman's charm, cowardice, treachery, lechery and fleetness of foot see the lovable rogue triumph by the skin of his chattering teeth.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780452260894
Publisher: Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date: 08/28/1985
Series: Flashman Series
Edition description: Reissue
Pages: 304
Sales rank: 323,733
Product dimensions: 5.45(w) x 8.00(h) x 0.82(d)
Age Range: 18 Years

About the Author

George MacDonald Fraser was a bestselling historical novelist, journalist and screenwriter. He is perhaps most famous for his series of Flashman novels, featuring his antihero Harry Flashman. In addition to his novels, he wrote numerous screenplays, most notably The Three Musketeers and the James Bond film Octopussy. George MacDonald Fraser died in 2008 at the age of 82.

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Flash for Freedom 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Flashman again flies in the face of adversity, if he is not dodging his black ship Captain John Charity Spring, he is dodging Amazons or the US Navy. Historical accuracy and fine footnotes again bring added value to the Flashman collection. A book to be read by all people for many reasons, totally enjoyable, the way history should be taught.
ehines on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Not for the easily offended, Flashman's narrative shows quite a bit of the offhand racism we might expect from a Victorian. But he's also honest and acknowledges merit where he finds it--so long as it isn't the high-principled kind.
MrsPlum on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Discovering Flashman has been my highlight for 2010. Fraser¿s skills as a novelist and historian is such that he created a character who remains ultimately likeable, despite his treatment of women. There have been many such men in life ¿ why not in art? Flash for Freedom in the first, and perhaps most disturbing, of the American Flashman adventures.
jztemple on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The recent death of George McDonald Fraser has brought a close (maybe permanent, maybe not?) to this delightful series of books. I have had the pleasure of following this series every since the release of the first book back in the sixties. The Flashman novels combine history (including substantial endnotes) with sex, action, adventure and the secret pleasure of enjoying the exploits of one of the most notoriously popular non-politically correct characters of 20th Century literature. Flashman is a womanizer, a coward, a scoundrel and a cheat, but in the novels, which are all narrated by Flashman himself, he is utterly honest with his readers. He is a man not proud of his faults, but certainly unabashed about them.The Flashman novels could be dismissed as sensationalized light reading , but Fraser cleverly tied his character into most of the major events of the last sixty years of the nineteenth century, a Victorian Zelig or Forrest Gump. Flashman casually mentions this minor detail or that simple observation, then Fraser in his assumed role as editor of the Flashman papers meticulously explains in the endnotes how these mentions by Flashman confirm the truth of his narrative, since only if Flashman was there could he have known about this fact or that. Fraser's endnotes also round out the historic details of the narrative, giving background and elaboration to the history-as-I-lived-it tales told by Flashman. It all works wonderfully, even if you somewhat suspect that some details are being outrageously fabricated.I very strongly recommend these books to anyone who has an interest in history and is willing to keep an open mind towards the womanizing and the language (the n-word appears quite a bit, but completely in character for Flashman). I would suggest the best way to read them is in order of publication. This doesn't follow Flashman's own life chronology, but the books published later often make reference to previous editions of the "Flashman Papers" and so is more fun for the reader to follow.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What can be said?
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