Fear Itself (Fearless Jones Series #2)

Fear Itself (Fearless Jones Series #2)

by Walter Mosley

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Overview

Written with the voice and vision that have made Mosley one of the most entertaining writers in America, "Fear Itself" marks the return of a master at the top of his form. Unabridged 6 CDs.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780759528116
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 07/01/2003
Series: Fearless Jones #2 , #2
Sold by: Hachette Digital, Inc.
Format: NOOK Book
Sales rank: 277,921
File size: 343 KB

About the Author

Walter Mosley (b.1952) is an American author of crime fiction best known for his Easy Rawlins detective series. Mosley began the series in 1990 with his book Devil in the Blue Dress, which was later adapted into a 1995 movie of the same name starring Denzel Washington. Some of the latest titles in the series include Little Green, Rose Gold, and Charcoal Joe. In 2016 Mosley was named Grand Master by the Mystery Writers of America.

Hometown:

New York, New York

Date of Birth:

January 12, 1952

Place of Birth:

Los Angeles, California

Education:

B.A., Johnson State College

Read an Excerpt

1

MOUSE IS DEAD. Those words had gone through my mind every morning for three months. Mouse is dead because of me.

When I sat up, Bonnie rolled her shoulder and sighed in her sleep. The sky through our bedroom window was just beginning to brighten.

The image of Raymond, his eyes open and unseeing, lying stockstill on EttaMae's front lawn, was still in my mind. I lurched out of bed and stumbled to the bathroom. My feet hurt every morning, too, as if I had spent all night walking, searching for EttaMae, to ask her where she'd taken Ray after carrying him out of the hospital.

So he was still alive? I asked a nurse who had been on duty that evening. No, she said flatly. His pulse was gone. The head nurse had just called the doctor to pronounce him dead when that crazy woman hit Arnold in the head with a suture tray and took Mr. Alexander's body over her shoulder.

I wandered into the living room and pulled the sash to open the drapes. Red sunlight glinted through the ragged palms at the end of our block. I had never wept over Raymond's demise, but that tattered light reflected a pain deep in my mind.


IT TOOK ME over half an hour to get dressed. No two socks matched and every shirt seemed to be the wrong color. While I was tying my shoes Bonnie woke up.

"What are you doing, Easy?" she asked. She had been born in British Guyana but her father was from Martinique, so there was the music of the French language in her English accent. "Gettin' dressed," I said. "Where are you going?"

"Where you think I'ma be goin' at this time'a day? To work." I was feeling mean because of that red light in the far-off sky. "But it's Saturday, baby." "What?"

Bonnie climbed out of the bed and hugged me. Her naked skin was firm and warm.

I pulled away from her. "You want some breakfast?" I asked. "Maybe a little later," she said. "I didn't get in from Idlewild until two this morning. And I have to go back out again today." "Then you go to bed," I said. "You sure? I mean... did you need to talk?" "Naw. Nuthin's wrong. Just stupid is all. Thinkin' Saturday's a workday. Damn."

"Are you going to be okay?" she asked. "Yeah. Sure I am." Bonnie had a fine figure. And she was not ashamed to be seen naked. Looking at her pulling on those covers reminded me of why I fell for her. If I hadn't been so sad, I would have followed her back under those blankets.


FEATHER'S LITTLE YELLOW DOG, Frenchie, was hiding somewhere, snarling at me while I made sausages and eggs. He was the love of my little girl's life, so I accepted his hatred. He blamed me for the death of Idabell Turner, his first owner; I blamed myself for the death of my best friend.


I WAS SITTING at breakfast, smoking a Chesterfield and wondering if EttaMae had moved back down to Houston. I still had friends down there in the Fifth Ward. Maybe if I wrote to Lenora Circel and just dropped a line about Etta — say hi to Etta for me or give Etta my love. Then when she wrote back I might learn something. "Hi, Dad."

My hand twitched, flicking two inches of cigarette ash on the eggs. Jesus was standing there in front of me. "I told you not to sneak up on me like that, boy." "I said hi," he explained.

The eggs were ruined but I wasn't hungry. And I couldn't stay mad at Jesus, anyway. I might have taken him in when he was a child, but the truth was that he had adopted me. Jesus worked hard at making our home run smoothly, and his love for me was stronger than blood.

"What you doin' today?" I asked him. "Nuthin'. Messin' around." "Sit down," I said.

Jesus didn't move the chair as he sat, because there was enough room for him to slide in under the table. He never wasted a movement — or a word. "I wanna drop out of high school," he said. "Say what?"

His dark eyes stared into mine. He had the smooth, eggshellbrown skin and the straight black hair of people who had lived in the Southwest for thousands of years. "It's only a year and a half till you graduate," I said. "A diploma will help you get a job. And if you keep up with track, you could get a scholarship to UCLA."

He looked down at my hands. "Why?" I asked. "I don't know," he said. "I just don't wanna be there. I don't wanna be there all the time." "You think I like goin' to work?" "You like it enough," he said. " 'Cause if you didn't like it, you'd quit."

I could see that he'd made up his mind, that he'd thought about this decision for a long time. He probably had the papers for me to sign under his bed.

I was about to tell him no, that he'd have to stick out the year at least. But then the phone rang. It was a loud ringer, especially at sixthirty in the morning.

While I limped to the counter Jesus left on silent bare feet.

"Hello?" "Easy?" It was a man's voice. "John? Is that you?"

"I'm in trouble and I need you to do me a favor," John said all in a rush. He'd been practicing just like Jesus. My heart quickened. The little yellow dog stuck his nose out from under the kitchen cabinet.

I don't know if it was an old friend's voice or the worry in his tone that got to me. But all of a sudden I wasn't miserable or sad. "What you need, John?"

"Why'ont you come over to the lots, Easy? I wanna look you in the eye when I tell ya what we want." "Oh," I said, thinking about we and the fact that whatever John had to say was too serious to be discussed over the phone. "Sure. As soon as I can make it."

I hung up with a giddy feeling running around my gut. I could feel the grin on my lips. "Who was that?" Bonnie asked. She was standing at the door to our bedroom, half wrapped in a terry-cloth robe. She was more beautiful than any man could possibly deserve.

"John." "The bartender?" "Do you have to leave today?" I asked. "Sorry. But after this trip I'll have a whole week off." "I can't wait that long," I said. I gathered her up in my arms and carried her back into the bedroom. "Easy, what are you doing?" I tossed her on the bed and then closed the door to the kitchen. I took off my pants and stood over her.

"Easy, what's got into you?"

The look on my face was answer enough for any arguments she might have had about the children or her need for sleep.

I couldn't have explained my sudden passion. All I knew was the smell of that woman, her taste and texture on my skin and tongue, was something I had never known before in my life. It was as if I discovered sex for the first time that morning.


Copyright © 2002 by Walter Mosley

Table of Contents

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Fear Itself (Fearless Jones Series #2) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 12 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Stage and cinema star Don Cheadle is an actor audiences seldom forget. His performances in 'Boogie Nights' and 'Traffic' leave an indelible impression, while his Golden Globe Award for his portrayal of Sammy Davis, Jr. on HBO's 'The Rat Pack' was more than well deserved. His training as a classical actor comes to the fore in his energetic, suspense filled reading of the latest Fearless Jones adventure. Listeners are transported to 1950s California - Los Angeles to be exact where Fearless enlists the help of Watts resident and bookstore owner Paris Minton. A good looking woman (of course) wants Fearless to locate her husband, and he wants Paris to join in the hunt. In true Mosley style it's not too long before Paris finds himself at odds with one of the richest black women in L.A. He's at a loss to know from whom to hide as danger closes in on him from all directions. The plot is complex as he careens from mishap to close call to almost-gotcha. Here's a first rate detective story spun by a master.
harstan More than 1 year ago
In 1955 Los Angeles, Leora Hartman hires Fearless Jones to find Kit Mitchell, the father of her son, who simply vanished. Though the case seems quite simple, finding someone who appears to have just moved on, Fearless quickly concludes he needs some intellectual help and who better than a book lover would suffice? So he enlists his friend, book seller Paris Minton to help him.

However, the easy queries that his mousy friend makes soon prove perilous as everyone including the client lie and are willing to use, even perhaps kill, Fearless and Paris. Others have vanished too with the sleuthing duo learning they, including Kit, are probably all dead. The dynamic pair (at least one dynamo and one passive) soon finds themselves as part of the focus of a war between local VIPs, a cosmetics queen and a developer, which also makes Fearless and Paris important to LAPD.

Have no fear, FEAR ITSELF is a great historical mystery that not only brings to life pre- Dodger LA, but does so inside an exciting who-done-it. Though perhaps the novel has too much subterfuge (and consequently subplots), the keys to this terrific tale are the lead detectives. Fearless lives up to his name, as he is somewhat like many of the genre¿s hard boiled types. However, Paris brings freshness by not being a superhero preparing to break steel with his teeth. Instead he is an intelligent individual so frightened with the threats to his well being and from what he has learned about the affluent, fans including those in Brooklyn, will feel at home with him even if the Padres is winning the subway series a continent away.

Harriet Klausner

Darrol on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Interesting characters in a somewhat convoluted plot. Intriguing idea of a family diary kept in handmade books since the 17th century. Winifred Fine, a Madame Walker (of Indianapolis) sort of character.
JFBallenger on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Noir fiction is all about character and voice. In Fearless Jones, Mosley presents a character that is such a physically strong and morally straightforward man of action that he runs the risk of coming off as a cartoonish super hero. But Mosley masterfully balances the moral simplicity of Jones with the narrator of the novels, his always reluctant partner if steadfast friend and timid intellectual Paris Minton. The contrast and rich friendship that develops between the two allows Mosley to say important things about the history and aspirations of African Americans in the hostile environment of post-World War II America. Like all of Mosley's detective fiction, Fear Itself presents the fast-paced action and intriguing plot required of the genre, but is laced with penetrating social commentary. In this book, Mosley continues to develop as a reliable guide to the ultimate mystery -- the human heart.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love the writing of Walter Mosely. I feel in love with the Fearless Jones series and am hoping that he will write another two or three books in this series. I have read all of the Easy Rawlins books and I highly recommend all of these books! Easy Rawlins and Fearless Jones.
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reader37JS More than 1 year ago
I'm a big fan the Author and have read just about all of his books. "Always Out Numbered, Always Out Gunned" is in my top 20 books. This book was good but not as good as his others. I'm still a fan and will always be.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Walter Mosley is a poet. His characters, scenes, plots, and language are beautifully sculpted. This is worth reading a few times over as you will surely pick up something extra each time through. This author and these characters are each a treasure.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I read the first Fearless Jones novel and enjoyed it. I listened to the 2nd Fearless Jones novel on Audio and I can't say enough about Don Cheadle's rendition. It was like seeing a movie in my head, just wonderful. I listened to that book at least five times in my car. The plot and the characterizations were wonderful. I read Walter Mosely's novels like other people read text books. I use a yellow marker, so I can highlight and remember those little gems of information on Black life he scatters through his novels. Walter Mosely and Don Cheadle are an unbeatable combination.