Fallen Dragon

Fallen Dragon

by Peter F. Hamilton

Paperback

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Overview

In the distant future, corporations have become sustainable communities with their own militaries, and corporate goals have essentially replaced political ideology. On a youthful, rebellious impulse, Lawrence joined the military of a corporation that he now recognizes to be ruthless and exploitative. His only hope for escape is to earn enough money to buy his place in a better corporation. When his platoon is sent to a distant colony to quell a local resistance effort, it seems like a stroke of amazing fortune, and Lawrence plans to rob the colony of their fabled gemstone, the Fallen Dragon, to get the money he needs. However, he soon discovers that the Fallen Dragon is not a gemstone at all, but an alien life form that the local colonists have been protecting since it crashed in their area. Now, Lawrence has to decide if he will steal the alien to exploit the use of its inherent biotechnical processes — which far exceed anything humans are capable of — or if he will help the Resistance get the alien home.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780316021838
Publisher: Orbit
Publication date: 12/14/2009
Pages: 825
Sales rank: 519,573
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.25(h) x 1.50(d)

About the Author

Peter F. Hamilton was born in Rutland, England in 1960. He began writing in 1987, and sold his first short story to Fear magazine in 1988. He has also been published in Interzone and the In Dreams and New Worlds anthologies, and several small press publications. His first novel was Mindstar Rising, published in 1993, and he has been steadily productive since then. Peter lives near Rutland Water with his wife and two children.

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Fallen Dragon 4.4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 35 reviews.
RandyStafford on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
As the novel states at the beginning, the fault of most things in the universe is money.And money is the problem with space exploration in the mid-24th century. Space exploration and colonization just isn't paying for itself. Colonies take centuries to repay investors. To make matters worse, some declare themselves independent of their corporate founders on Earth. The solution? The "asset-recovery mission", legalized piracy where corporate armies swoop down on colonies to plunder them.Lawrence Newton is a sergeant in such an army, and, when he gets word of an impending mission to the planet Thallspring, he starts to plan a little private asset realization of his own. On Thallspring, we get the story of a mission frustrated by local resistance headed up by Denise Ebourn who is much more than the simple storyteller and schoolteacher she appears to be.Alternating with this plot is the story of how Newton, son of corporate elite on the colony Amethi, fled his home after a bitter betrayal. Spurred on by a beloved science fiction "i-drama", he dreams of becoming a starship explorer. Twenty years later, this exiled corporate prince is a corporate mercenary and still dreaming. Counterpointed to Newton's adventures are Ebourn's tales, for her students, of Prince Mozark of the long dead Ring Empire and the civilizations he finds in his quest for life's purpose and what course his people should adopt. Thus the novel not only turns out to be filled with Hamilton's typically clear and exciting combat sequences and technological skullduggery but is also a look at the economic constraints on space travel and colonization, the spreading of corporate uniculture on Earth and on man's colonies, the purpose humans should find in their lives as technology advances, and the influence of science fiction's romances on our future.This novel doesn't immerse you in a world as thoroughly as Hamilton's Night's Dawn series did simply because it has fewer pages, but Hamilton pays careful attention to his technology and economics.And the last hundred pages of this novel will change your whole perception of what has gone before.
BrianBlose on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Fallen Dragon depicts a future where corporations have colonized distant solar systems - and extract dividends from these new worlds by raiding them for technology and resources every few decades. Due to some bad choices in his past, Lawrence is a soldier for a large corporation. He hops inside a techno-organic suit and terrorizes (usually innocent) civilians for a living. Lawrence plans to get out of the soldiering business after the Thallspring campaign. Little did he know what was waiting for him on that world.This book is a real gem. Peter Hamilton is known for his sprawling epics, but I think this stand-alone novel is his best work. It is quintessential Hamilton, so if you don't like deus ex machina endings then steer clear. Otherwise, I strongly recommend it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Nobody does space opera of the quality of Peter F Hamilton. Solid characters, complex but logical plots, excellent and inventive technology. He does fantastic fantasy, too, but not in this novel. Some readers complain of the complexity and numerous characters and interwoven plots. That's why I love his stuff. I read for entertainment, not speed. The Nook gives the ability to quickly look up characters who might not have appeared for a few chapters so you can remind yourself of their role, should you forget or get confused. No big deal. Just slow down and enjoy the ride. The biggest problem I have with PFH's books is that I've read nearly all of them. Anyway, Fallen Dragon is a very enjoyable coming of age story (as was Star Wars...) written for adults, though teens could also enjoy it if they have the vocabulary. Hamilton doesn't dumb it down. Fun read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good read. Interesting characters
MyOpinion More than 1 year ago
The story was pretty complex with some very interesting technology. I would have given this another star if the writer had made it more obvious when it went into a flashback. I was confused in the first third of the book because the timelines just didn't seem right. Call me simple, but I read SF for entertainment, and I don't want to have to over analyze a story just to follow it. That said, the story is captivating and exciting in places. If you are reading this and decide to read the book, then spend a little extra time at the beginning of each chapter to figure out when it belongs. They are not in chronological order. It will be more enjoyable.
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Of DragonClan.
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