ISBN-10:
0123868866
ISBN-13:
9780123868862
Pub. Date:
03/30/2012
Publisher:
Elsevier Science
Embedded Systems Security: Practical Methods for Safe and Secure Software and Systems Development

Embedded Systems Security: Practical Methods for Safe and Secure Software and Systems Development

by David Kleidermacher, Mike Kleidermacher
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Overview

The ultimate resource for making embedded systems reliable, safe, and secure

Embedded Systems Security provides:

  • A broad understanding of security principles, concerns, and technologies
  • Proven techniques for the efficient development of safe and secure embedded software
  • A study of the system architectures, operating systems and hypervisors, networking, storage, and cryptographic issues that must be considered when designing secure embedded systems
  • Nuggets of practical advice and numerous case studies throughout

Written by leading authorities in the field with 65 years of embedded security experience: one of the original developers of the world’s only Common Criteria EAL 6+ security certified software product and a lead designer of NSA certified cryptographic systems.

This book is indispensable for embedded systems and security professionals, new and experienced.

An important contribution to the understanding of the security of embedded systems. The Kleidermachers are experts in their field. As the Internet of things becomes reality, this book helps business and technology management as well as engineers understand the importance of "security from scratch." This book, with its examples and key points, can help bring more secure, robust systems to the market.

  • Dr. Joerg Borchert, Vice President, Chip Card & Security, Infineon Technologies North America Corp.; President and Chairman, Trusted Computing Group

Embedded Systems Security provides real-world examples of risk and exploitation; most importantly the book offers clear insight into methods used to counter vulnerabilities to build true, native security into technology.

  • Adriel Desautels, President and CTO, Netragard, LLC.

Security of embedded systems is more important than ever. The growth in networking is just one reason. However, many embedded systems developers have insufficient knowledge of how to achieve security in their systems. David Kleidermacher, a world-renowned expert in this field, shares in this book his knowledge and long experience with other engineers. A very important book at the right time.

  • Prof. Dr.-Ing. Matthias Sturm, Leipzig University of Applied Sciences; Chairman, Embedded World Conference steering board



  • Gainan understanding of the operating systems, microprocessors, and network security critical issues that must be considered when designing secure embedded systems
  • Contains nuggets of practical and simple advice on critical issues highlightedthroughout the text
  • Short and to –the- point real case studies included to demonstrate embedded systems security in practice

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780123868862
Publisher: Elsevier Science
Publication date: 03/30/2012
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 1,028,966
Product dimensions: 7.50(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.10(d)

About the Author

David Kleidermacher is Chief Technology Officer at Green Hills Software where he is responsible for technology strategy, platform planning, and solutions design. Kleidermacher is a leading authority in systems software and security, including secure operating systems and virtualization technology. Kleidermacher is one of the original authors of INTEGRITY, the first and only operating system technology certified to EAL 6+ High Robustness, the highest Common Criteria security level ever achieved for a software product. Kleidermacher earned his bachelor of science in computer science from Cornell University and has been the world’s most prolific writer and speaker on embedded systems security over the past decade. He has been with Green Hills Software since 1991.

Mike Kleidermacher is a retired electrical engineer whose 45 year career was dedicated to the design, implementation, and strategic evolution of secure embedded communications devices. Mike held various positions, including program manager, technical director, and chief engineer, within GE Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, and L-3 Communications and specialized in hardware and systems engineering for Type-1 NSA certified communications systems. With his countless contributions to innovative products such as the Army’s Mobile Subscriber Equipment, Ricebird crypto chip, Talon network encryptor, and Guardian secure smartphone, Mike is a legend in the United States INFOSEC/COMSEC communities. Mike holds a Top Secret / SCI U.S. government clearance and numerous patents related to the design and implementation of embedded security hardware. Mike received his master of science in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

Mike Kleidermacher is a retired electrical engineer whose 45 year career was dedicated to the design, implementation, and strategic evolution of secure embedded communications devices. Mike held various positions, including program manager, technical director, and chief engineer, within GE Aerospace, Lockheed Martin, and L-3 Communications and specialized in hardware and systems engineering for Type-1 NSA certified communications systems. With his countless contributions to innovative products such as the Army’s Mobile Subscriber Equipment, Ricebird crypto chip, Talon network encryptor, and Guardian secure smartphone, Mike is a legend in the United States INFOSEC/COMSEC communities. Mike holds a Top Secret / SCI U.S. government clearance and numerous patents related to the design and implementation of embedded security hardware. Mike received his master of science in electrical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania.

Read an Excerpt

Embedded Systems Security

Practical Methods for Safe and Secure Software and Systems Development
By David Kleidermacher Mike Kleidermacher

Newnes

Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-12-386887-9


Chapter One

Introduction to Embedded Systems Security

Chapter Outline 1.1 What is Security? 1 1.2 What is an Embedded System? 2 1.3 Embedded Security Trends 4 1.3.1 Embedded Systems Complexity 4 1.3.1.1 Case Study: Embedded Linux 6 1.3.2 Network Connectivity 12 1.3.3 Reliance on Embedded Systems for Critical Infrastructure 14 1.3.4 Sophisticated Attackers 15 1.3.5 Processor Consolidation 16 1.4 Security Policies 18 1.4.1 Perfect Security 18 1.4.2 Confidentiality, Integrity, and Availability 18 1.4.3 Isolation 19 1.4.4 Information Flow Control 20 1.4.5 Physical Security Policies 21 1.4.6 Application-Specific Policies 21 1.5 Security Threats 22 1.5.1 Case Study: VxWorks Debug Port Vulnerability 22 1.6 Wrap-up 23 1.7 Key Points 23 1.8 Bibliography and Notes 24

1.1 What is Security?

Any book about security must start with some definition for it. If ten security professionals are asked to define the term, ten different results will be forthcoming. To attain validity for the innumerable variety of embedded systems and their functions, our brush uses a broad stroke:

Key Point

Security is the ability of an entity to protect resources for which it bears protection responsibility.

In an embedded system, this protection responsibility may apply to resources within or resources of the overall system to which the embedded system is connected or in which it is subsumed. As we discuss later in this chapter, the protective properties of a component or system are embodied in its security policy.

1.2 What is an Embedded System?

Attempts to define "embedded system" are also often fraught with controversy. For the purposes of this book, we define embedded system as follows:

Key Point

An embedded system is an electronic product that contains a microprocessor (one or more) and software to perform some constituent function within a larger entity.

Any definition of embedded system must be augmented with examples. We do not claim an aircraft is an embedded system, but its flight control system; traffic collision avoidance system (TCAS); communication, navigation, and surveillance system (CNS); electronic flight bag system (EFB); and even in-flight entertainment system are all examples of embedded systems within the aircraft (see Figure 1.1).

We do not claim the automobile is an embedded system. But its infotainment "head-unit," antilock breaking system, powertrain engine control unit, digital instrument cluster, and a plethora of other electronic subsystems—dozens in the typical modern car—are all examples of embedded systems (see Figure 1.2).

Embedded systems are often characterized by what they are not: the antithesis of the embedded system is the desktop personal computer whose main Intel Architecture (IA)-based microprocessor powers the human interface and application environment that serves as the entity's sole purpose. Similarly, a rack-mounted server's main microprocessor performs a dedicated service, such as hosting a website.

A gray area causes the aforementioned controversy. Some argue whether a smartphone is an embedded system or just a miniature desktop computer. Nevertheless, there is little debate that individual components within the phone, such as the radio with its own baseband microprocessor and software, are embedded systems. Similarly, some servers contain auxiliary daughter cards that perform health monitoring and remote management to improve overall availability. Each card contains a microprocessor and software and hence meets our definition of embedded system.

The scope of this book liberally includes smartphones whose overall security is highly dependent upon embedded hardware and software.

Of course, this book is concerned about embedded systems that are involved in some security-critical function, and some embedded systems lack security requirements altogether. This book generally does not concern itself with a standalone, battery-powered thermostat run by an 8-bit microcontroller and a few kilobytes of software programmed in assembly code. The largest security challenge in embedded systems lies in network-connected, sophisticated electronic products that are managed by an embedded operating system running significant software applications written in high-level programming languages such as C, C++, Ada, and Java.

1.3 Embedded Security Trends

The MP944, what many consider to be the world's first microprocessor, ran the flight control system aboard the U.S. Navy's F-14 Tomcat fighter jet and began what has been more than 40 years of advancement in embedded systems technology. Depending on the particular analyst asked, embedded computers account for 94% to 98% of the world's computers. Practically every major multinational corporation—firms such as Lockheed Martin, Exxon, General Motors, Hewlett Packard, and Johnson & Johnson—builds and depends on embedded systems within its most important products. And, of course, the average consumer depends on the embedded applications within aircraft, automobiles, games, medical equipment, and so on, constantly.

At the same time, software and hardware complexity, network connectivity, and malicious attack threat continue to grow in embedded systems, which are increasingly relied upon for consumer safety and security. The smart grid—with its smart appliances and sensors, smart meters, and network gateways (all embedded systems)—is a good example, but only one of many. The complex set of embedded systems and networks in a smart grid is shown in Figure 1.3.

1.3.1 Embedded Systems Complexity

One of the first embedded systems within an automobile was the 1978 Cadillac Seville's trip computer, run by a Motorola 6802 microprocessor with 128 bytes of RAM and two kilobytes of ROM. The printed source code could not have occupied more than a handful of pages.

In contrast, even the lowest-end automobile today contains at least a dozen microprocessors; the highest-end cars are estimated to contain approximately 100 microprocessors. With infotainment systems running sophisticated operating systems such as Microsoft Windows and Linux, the total embedded software content can easily exceed 100 million lines of code. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter's avionics is estimated to host approximately 6 million lines of code, driven by fly-by-wire controls, complex situational-awareness capabilities, sensor processing, and high-resolution graphical displays for the pilot. Enterprise network switches and routers routinely contain millions of lines of code for network protocol processing, management and configuration, anti-virus rate limiting, and access controls.

In short, complexity is driven by the inexorable demand for better capabilities, the digitization of manual and mechanical functions, and the interconnection of our world. While this growth in electronic content has been beneficial to society, that growth is also a key source of our security woes.

Key Point

Many of the problems relating to loss in quality, safety, and/or security in electronic products can be attributed to the growth of complexity that cannot be effectively managed.

It is well known that operational flaws, such as a buffer overflows (when software fails to validate the length of an input, permitting the input to overwrite beyond the end of an allocated memory area that is used to hold the input), are often the means by which attackers are able to circumvent system security policies. Complexity, of course, cannot be measured only by code size or transistor count.

Key Point

Linear growth in hardware/software content creates far more than linear growth in overall complexity due to an exponential increase in interactions between functions and components.

Complexity breeds flaws, and flaws can be exploited to breach system security. Controlling complexity from a security perspective is one of the foremost concerns of this book.

1.3.1.1 Case Study: Embedded Linux

To help better understand the scope of this complexity problem and motivate the information in Chapters 2 and 3 regarding software security, let's take a closer look at the use of Linux within embedded systems. Embedded Linux has been growing in popularity due to its royalty-free licensing, open source accessibility, and wide availability of device drivers and applications. Despite having thousands of contributors worldwide, the strictly controlled change management process for Linux (especially the Linux kernel) is excellent relative to general commercial software quality standards. Steve McConnell, in his book Code Complete, estimates a software industry average of approximately 30 bugs per 1,000 lines of production code. Yet the Linux kernel boasts a far better track record of between 1 and 5 bugs per 10,000 lines of code.

The use of Linux in systems requiring high levels of security has been a frequent topic of controversy. Supporters have claimed that Linux's open source approach improves security due to exposure to a worldwide community of developers and users (sometimes called the "many eyes" theory). Detractors have maintained that the complexity and architecture of Linux make it unsuitable for high criticality applications.

Two recent events are shining a bright light on this debate. In August 2009, the Linux Foundation published a paper, Linux Kernel Development, detailing the massive, rapidly growing development and deployment of Linux in everything from mobile phones to television sets and video cameras. About a year later, researchers published details of a severe kernel vulnerability, which had existed in Linux for the preceding eight years.

With a Linux lifetime of over 15 years, there are now plenty of public statistics with which to analyze the operating system's robustness. This case study looks at the aforementioned recent events as well as other public sources of information to conclude on the current state and outlook for Linux in high-security systems.

1.3.1.1.1 Linux in Government Systems

Some powerful organizations have been supporters of Linux in security-critical government computer systems. Linux is the trusted operating system in HP's NetTop, the Raytheon/TCS Trusted Thin Client, and the General Dynamics Trusted Virtual Environment (TVE)—a product of NSA's High-Assurance Platform (HAP) program. All these products are designed to consolidate computers used by government personnel to access classified and unclassified networks. The specialized computer provides multiple "virtual" desktops and is trusted to protect sensitive information. To prepare it better for the task of becoming the "touching point" between physically distinct networks, Linux was enhanced by the NSA's National Information Assurance Research Laboratory with additional security controls, known as Security-Enhanced Linux (SELinux). The SELinux extensions have been adopted by the enterprise Linux community and employed within the aforementioned computer systems.

Along with their investment in Linux, these military suppliers have made bold claims about the trustworthiness of these products. According to General Dynamics, the TVE provides "high robustness" and a "quantum leap in the way military and government security levels are accessed."

It is interesting to note, however, that the NSA's developers were careful not to claim suitability for high criticality systems, stating that SELinux is "very unlikely by itself to meet any interesting definition of secure system." Furthermore, the SELinux effort has included "no work focused upon increasing the assurance of Linux itself."

While many discussions about the security of Linux have been clouded by hyperbole and commercial agendas, a number of independent resources, many published by the Linux community, are painting a more complete, unbiased picture about Linux security.

Linux development follows general commercial practices, not compliant with any stringent safety or security standard. While Linux's open source exposure has enabled it to achieve a low defect rate relative to most commercial software, the size of the kernel assures a large and continuous dose of flaws. In 2004, an automated static analysis tool discovered almost 1,000 bugs in the Linux kernel.

The U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology and the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's National Security Cyber Division publish a catalog, the National Vulnerability Database (NVD), of security defects in commercial software products. As of August 16, 2009, a search on Linux yielded 1,288 entries, 457 of which are considered "High Severity." One hundred thirty-four high severity vulnerabilities are associated with the Linux kernel. The NVD reports 91, 77, 87, 111, and 115 Linux kernel vulnerabilities for each of the years 2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, and 2010, respectively. It is statistically assured that a similar number will be found in future years, implying that numerous vulnerabilities exist in today's shipping version. These numbers, of course, do not account for unreported defects.

On August 10, 2009, a memory leak in the SELinux security extensions was published in the NVD. A few days later, five more vulnerabilities were published. One of these, CVE2009-2692, reports a severe kernel defect that can be trivially exploited by a user to take complete control of the system. This vulnerability was latent in the Linux kernel for eight years!

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Embedded Systems Security by David Kleidermacher Mike Kleidermacher Copyright © 2012 by Elsevier Inc. . Excerpted by permission of Newnes. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
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Table of Contents

Dedication Foreword Preface Acknowledgements 1. Introduction to Embedded Systems Security 2. Systems Software Considerations 3. Secure Embedded Software Development 4. Embedded Cryptography 5 Data Protection Protocols 6 Emerging Applications Index

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