Elantris: Tenth Anniversary Author's Definitive Edition

Elantris: Tenth Anniversary Author's Definitive Edition

by Brandon Sanderson

Paperback(Mass Market Paperback - First Edition)

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Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780765350374
Publisher: Tom Doherty Associates
Publication date: 05/30/2006
Edition description: First Edition
Pages: 656
Sales rank: 28,429
Product dimensions: 4.21(w) x 6.75(h) x 1.02(d)
Lexile: HL790L (what's this?)

About the Author

Brandon Sanderson grew up in Lincoln, Nebraska. He teaches creative writing at Brigham Young University and lives in Utah with his wife and children. He has been chosen to complete the concluding volumes of Robert Jordan’s bestselling Wheel of Time® series.

What People are Saying About This

"Elantris is the finest novel of fantasy to be written in many years. Brandon Sanderson has created a truly original world of magic and intrigue, and with the rigor of the best science fiction writers he has made it real at every level.”—Orson Scott Card

Elantris . . . is marked by vivid and strongly drawn characters and ingenious plot twists that will keep the reader turning pages. Don’t miss it!”—Katherine Kurtz, New York Times bestselling author of the Deryni series

“Outstanding fantasy debut . . . . The intrigue and excitement grow steadily in this smoothly written, perfectly balanced narrative; by the end readers won’t want to put it down.” –Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

“A completely unique world that enfolds the reader in mystery and wonder right through till the last page.”–Romantic Times BookClub Magazine "Brandon Sanderson is the real thing—an exciting storyteller with a unique and powerful vision. Elantris is one of the finest debuts I've seen in years."—David Farland

"Elantris is a new Ben Hur for the fantasy genre, with a sweeping, epic storyline and well-drawn and sympathetic characters."—Kevin J. Anderson

 "While every new fantasy author is hailed as unique, new, and different, Brandon Sanderson's Elantris does indeed provide an absorbing adventure in a unique, different, and well-thought-out fantasy world, with a few nifty twists as well."-L. E. Modesitt, Jr. “Sanderson’s fantasy debut offers a vibrant cast of characters and a story of faith and determination set against a vividly portrayed world . . . filled with surprising twists and turns and a conclusion both satisfying and original.” –Library Journal, Starred Review

David Farland

"Brandon Sanderson is the real thing—Elantris is one of the finest debuts I've seen in years.

L.E. Modesitt

"A unique, different, and well-thought-out fantasy world, with a few nifty twists as well.

Kevin J. Anderson

"Elantris is a new Ben Hur for the fantasy genre, with a sweeping, epic storyline and well-drawn and sympathetic characters.

Katherine Kurtz

"Vivid and strongly drawn characters and ingenious plot twists that will keep the reader turning pages. Don't miss it!

Orson Scott Card

"Elantris is the finest novel of fantasy to be written in many years. . . . a truly original world.

Customer Reviews

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Elantris: Tenth Anniversary Author's Definitive Edition 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 160 reviews.
ir0nli0nzi0nzbee More than 1 year ago
Elantris, by Brandon Sanderson, is a great novel. This story of "gods" brought low is quite gripping, leaving the reader on the edge of his or her seat. The story of the Elantrans, and their once great race and city, is very deep, with a plot that has more twists and turns than a hedge maze. A prince deeply loved by his people, shows the signs of the changing, pronounced dead, and thrown in the old city of Elantris with the rest of these immortal beings. His betrothed arrives at the palace only to find that he has "died," yet the story she is told seems not to fit with what she sees. A priest of the most powerful religion in the world sees the fall of Elantris as a sign that his religion is the one true path...or is it? Elantris was hard to put down, and even harder to know that it is a standalone, for I only want more!
songbirdsue More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book. I found the time and world fascinating. It was amazing to think of an arranged marriage princess bride arriving to her new land to find out that her intended was dead and she was married to him, thus a widow never having met him in person. I have to admit that I have never met a character who came so close and yet had such a hard time getting married. I marvel how both the Princess and Prince created their own realms similarly yet apart. You want so badly for them to get together because you know that they would be good together. I love how the Prince pieces together the puzzle and comes to really love the Princess. He was so good at changing everyone in Elantris by giving them a job to do, a purpose. It really helps you appreciate our need for purpose in our lives. I was fascinated by the science involved in Elantris. It is hard to keep track of all of the characters especially because they sometimes have similar sounding names. There are a ton of characters to keep track of too. I found the priests involvement in the story disturbing at times but also intriguing. I do like how it ends.
Michael_Sw More than 1 year ago
What if the city of the gods, a beacon of hope and healing around the world, suddenly turned into a place of disease and ceaseless pain? The story of Elantris picks up ten years after the miraculous city of Elantris suffers that fate, and details the political maneuverings in the outside world in the aftermath. The book has no elves, no rings, no dragons, no wands, no vampires, and no werewolves and tells a humdinger of a good story. This is the first book I've read by Brandon Sanderson, and if they're all this good, I'm going to get every one.
KelliJ1 More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book. It's definitely not as good as Sanderson's later works, but it's reflective of his fertile imagination. I loved the premised and enjoyed the plot. The characters were just okay and the ending wrapped up a little too neatly, which is why I don't rate it higher. Don't let the overhyping spoil it for you. It's a fine, middle-of-the-pack fantasy.
Arrat More than 1 year ago
This was an excellent book. For people who are "dying" , they are taken to a city of the damned. The prince of the city, finds himself there, but refuses to let the sickness stop him from helping others, learning more about the sickness, & finds the cure. Prince Raoden is a true prince. He helps the city occupants remember their humanity & with that establishes leadership over many of the factions in the city of the damned. I would also encourage to read many of his other stories.
Chrissy_W More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed it despite the politicking. Did I enjoy this book: I did. A friend of mine recommended it to me, and well, I’m a sucker for sci-fi. There was just a bit too much politicking for my interests, but I did enjoy it, and if you’re a fan of Dune, you’ll like it as well. The imagery was stunning – it would translate well to the big screen – and the writing was darn close to perfection. The conclusion felt a bit contrived; it was, despite the numerous deaths, just a bit too neat. The Elantrians are doused in oil, Spirit is on his way to eternal damnation, and Serene is moments away from her demise, and yet – suddenly – everything falls into place quite perfectly, and everything turns out okay. It was just a bit too lovely to be believable (well, as believable as a book about a city of once-magical-now-zombie people can be, I suppose). Even still, I enjoyed it up to the last page. Would I recommend it: For sure! Especially if you’re a fan of the Dune series, you’ll like the mix of politics, magic, and love affairs. Will I read it again: It’s unlikely due to the ginormous “To Read” list I’m currently grappling with, but Sanderson left ample room for a sequel, and I’d certainly read that! As reviewed by Melissa at Every Free Chance Book Reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't read many fantasy books, but I really enjoyed Brandon Sanderson's reading so I thought that I would do a review on one of his books. Since I was unfamiliar with his work, I went to one of my friends who is a really big fan of his writing and asked him where to start, so I started at the beginning, with his first novel, Elantris. I was almost immediately drawn into this book. I really enjoyed his style of moving from one vantage point to another, giving you the different sides of the story. I loved that this book wasn't as predictable as I thought. As I read books, I'm usually trying to come up with what would happen in the end. I merely got the gist of what was going to happen. I can honestly tell you that I was surprised at the things that happened in this story. I however get impatient when I read a book. I was constantly reading and waiting to see if my conjectures were right. This is one of those books that is hard to put down. I stayed up until two in the morning trying to finish it. It was absolutely fantastic. Sanderson utilized so many elements. It wasn't one of those books where there was a single problem that the entire book was based on. All of his main characters are constantly trying to solve multiple problems, making you wonder exactly how everything fits together. It was a remarkable novel and I would suggest it to just about everyone.
ZebraStripe More than 1 year ago
Elantris is an outstanding novel. Though this is Sanderson's debut, do not be fooled. The novel quickly picks up pace in the first chapter and gains momentum from there on. There are three protagonists--Raoden, prince of Arelon; Sarene, princess of Teod; Hrathen, a gyorn, or Derethi priest. All three characters are well-developed; the reader will soon fall in love with them. The story starts off with Raoden. He awakes to find himself a victim of the Shaod, a condition in which causes a person to seem dead. He is then thrown into Elantris, the city of the dammed who are cursed with the Shaod. The city used to contain god-like humans, but it now holds cursed humans. Raoden wants to restore the former glory of Elantris and studies Aons, Elantrian magic. He soon discovers the problem... In Arelon, Sarene, intended to be wedded to Raoden, finds herself widowed. So, she engages Hrathen in a religious battle hoping to save Arelon--Shu-Korath, her religion, versus Shu-Dereth, Hrathen's religion. However, Sarene is unaware that Hrathen is, in fact, preventing Wyrn from slaughtering the people by converting them to Shu-Dereth. Resistance will cause problems... This is an amazing book; the best I've read in a long time. Elantris is original and intellectually-stimulating. I recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good fantasy novel with interesting characters, as well as an engaging plot.
Tyler_MCA_Knight More than 1 year ago
Brandon Sanderson is now among my favorite authors of all time because of his writing style, character progression, and storyline. He has a way with words that creates a feeling that you are a part of the world, not just a casual observer. Through this feeling, he is able to convey emotions much better because it makes the reader feel them just as much as the characters in the story. The character progression in this book is great, watching the main people grow from emotional states that one might find a bit distasteful, to grown adults with stable emotions. They are not perfect, but that makes the readers able to relate to them even better. Best of all, though, is the storyline that Mr. Sanderson creates. He is able to develop a plot by using a simple obstacle and turning it into one of the biggest worlds of intrigue, mystery, violence, love, supernatural, and all around mayhem. he turns a simple murder into governmental collapse; he turns a travelling princess into the savior of a world; and he turns a very evil antagonist into something that may surprise the reader (sorry no spoilers). The fact that he does these things doesn't make him a great author, for anyone could do that; it is how he does it. He is very subtle with his touch in the progression of the plot, he adds in some ostentatious pieces to distract the reader, and then he springs a twist on you that has been building in the underlying intrigue part of the plot. This is one of the best books that I have read in a long time, and I give it an incredible amout of recommendation and respect.
AmyJ More than 1 year ago
Some people seem to dislike Sanderson's way of not explaining everything about everything. From my perspective, and after reading his other books, I believe Sanderson didn't write Elantris as a part of a series, or even found telling the entire history (other than a few plot points that required it)of the complex civilizations that make up his world entirely necessary to the story. In fact, I thought the parallels between Islam and Derethi were almost obvious, and didn't really require a full, extensive explanation for those who could pick up on that. As well, he includes a glossary with definitions at the back of the book for those who find it too much of a struggle to understand.

Other than that, I was very pleased to discover that Sanderson is a brilliant story teller (I only checked him out because he is finishing up Memory of Light). His characters have depth and likability, and, even though I tend to loathe political fantasy, the political intrigue parts of the story are *actually* intriguing. He gives the tired genre of fantasy a much needed make-over. Would highly recommend this, and his other books.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I have just finsihed reading this amazing book and I am glad I found it. I feel in love with all the wonderful people in this book and read it every chance I got. When I wasn't able to read it I could not get it off my mind this book blew me away becuase at the time I bought it I was not able to fully read what it was about and by luck it was one of the best books I have read. Now I am going to by another book by this author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My job requires a lot of travel, so I'm always looking for great books to keep me company. I finished this one in four days, even with full days and busy nights. Any spare moment I could get was spent reading this novel. As a long-time lover of fantasy, I will be watching this author's career excitedly.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I'm in shock... I can't remember the last time I read good modern fantasy- oh, right. There wasn't a last time. The book does have a few problems- first, his made up languages/alphabet- inventing a language is not a good idea. It's very hard to take someone seriously when they're constantly being referred to as a 'gyorn'. Also, as a general rule, thousand-petaled flower-type things are not good alphabet-wise. Second, the 'cliamctic final battle' drags. For something like 50 pages. Overall, however, it's a good book. It was especially attractive in the store because it had no 'Volume One of Whatever' on its cover, which is quite nice after all the (badly-written) never-ending fantasy sequences that people normally write.
JechtShot on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The Elantrians - a once god like people who could heal the wounded, transform food from waste and travel great distances, all through the use of drawing characters in the air known as Aons. In order to join the noble faction of Elantris one must be chosen; pauper or nobleman were all candidates. However, 10 years ago a curse befell the Elantrians, the Shaod, in which the recipient was transformed into a blotchy skinned human-like creature without the powers once granted to the chosen few. The story centers around the relationship between two characters, Raoden and Sarene. Raoden, the once crown prince of the land is stricken by the Shaod and sequestered to Elantris. There he strives to learn the secrets of the city and hopes to cure the Shaod and restore hope to his people. Sarene, the lanky princess who is slated to marry Raoden, attempts to restore hope and prosperity to the people from outside the grim walls of Elantris. Elantris is not quite as strong as Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy, but it is a solid standalone fantasy novel. Fans of Sanderson's attention to detail, especially to that of magic, are sure to enjoy this epic tale.
Waianuhea on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If you like science fiction or fantasy, especially post-apocolyptic fiction, read this! Hell, just read it anyway! I love it!
bluesalamanders on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I really enjoyed this book; once I got started with it, I could barely put it down, and it took me only a day, day and a half to read it. I thought the characters had depth, the plots intertwined convincingly, and I really liked the resolutions.
harpua on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Since Sanderson is the author tasked with the job of finishing the Wheel of Time series after Robert Jordan's death, I wanted to read some of his other works to get a feel for him. I picked up Elantris since it was a standalone novel, something that seems to be a bit of a rarity these days in the fantasy world. This started out strong as we're introduced to the characters and setting. The book is broken up into a triad of chapters. There are three viewpoint characters and we rotate through them every three chapters. Only one of them held my interest for the first half of the book. This is mostly a political themed book and there is little action in the first 200-300 pages. Plenty of important setup though and considering the story and where we are headed, it was needed to tell the story. While I typically enjoy a bit more action in my fantasy novels, I appreciate that Sanderson didn't sprinkle in some just to satisfy they "we must have massive battles every few pages, just to fill in the gaps between the story" trap that a lot of fantasy novels fall in to. However, the second half of the book was worth the wait. There is a bit more action, still not a ton, but the pacing picks up and wow the twists. Branderson has a way of leading you in seemingly one direction only to throw a twist at you that at least I didn't expect. Everytime I thought I had the story figured out, I was wrong. That style of writing I enjoy. Well done. This is one I would definitly recommend to anyone and I will be picking up the remainder of Sanderson's books and anticipating his finale of Jordan's mammoth series.
MisterJJones on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Elantris has good concepts, but is let down by mediocre writing. It's quite obviously a first novel, and will never be considered a classic, but Sanderson shows potential in his worldbuilding.The novel begins strong, the legendary magic of Elantris failed 10 years ago and the Elantrians turned overnight from living gods into cursed, tortured, and diseased outcasts, imprisoned in the ruins of their once great city. Prince Raoden finds himself thrust among them, while his bride to be must deal with a potential invasion by the neighboring theocracy."From prince to beggar" makes a nice change from "beggar to prince", but Raoden and his betrothed are both irritatingly perfect characters, while their quest to restore an "enlightened" despotism of the magically gifted that made me root for the theocratic invaders, particularly as the main "enemy" is portrayed in a sympathetic light. As a result, I found it difficult to work up much sympathy for the plight of our heroes.The strongest element is the worldbuilding, the magic system is well thought out, issues of politics and religion are reasonably balanced and complex - it's a shame the characters seem something of an afterthought. I haven't read any others of Sanderson's works, but my hope is that they prove more balanced, because he has ideas that are worth exploring.
RebeccaAnn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Elantris used to be the city of the gods. Those who woke up as Elantrians were worshipped. Then, one day, Elantris fell. What once was beautiful began to decay.When the crown prince of Arelon, Raoden, becomes Elantrian, he decides to rebuild the city from within. Meanwhile, his betrothed Sarene battles outside the once great city to keep it safe from Jaddeth fanatics, in particular one bothersome priest: Hrathen.I really liked this story. It was a unique fantasy and even better, it was only one volume (though the ending did hint that there could possibly be a sequel). There was plenty of angst, but it was balanced nicely with plenty of humor. Sanderson did a marvelous job of tying up all the loose ends by the end of the book so there were no details that made you go "But wait! What about that one thing!"The only thing I really didn't like about this book was a lack of character depth. Sarene was a very good character but she had very few faults. The biggest thing was she was too smart in a time where feminism was looked down upon. Raoden had zero faults. He was loved by all. He's funny, witty, and charming. Everything he does contributes only good. It's actually quite annoying. The only characters who were really interesting were Hrathen and Dilaf, both bad guys. Hrathen was the standard bad guy who didn't really want to hurt anyone and Dilaf had been driven crazy by the death of wife. Both interesting backgrounds, but when one's a stereotype and one is just an excuse to be completely evil, it doesn't produce the best story.In short, throughout the entire book, I kept thinking to myself: "This is really, really good but something is just...off." I still think it's worth reading because for some reason, it's fairly easy to overlook the lack of character depth. It is only Sanderson's debut novel and I plan on reading his Mistborn trilogy soon. Hopefully, he will have improved upon this point.
dw0rd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Somewhat predictable but not totally formulaic. A beautiful city and it's beautiful people suddenly begin to rot and deform. Ten years later, the surrounding cities are still trying to cope with the loss of Elantris's beneficence. Matters worsen with the influence of evil kingdoms, politicians, and religious fanatics. Prince Raoden will fix all this, but, whoa, he gets hit with rot and deformity and is banished to the diseased Elantris. The strength of this book is the strong characterization and the intriguing environment. Even knowing how it would have a happy ending didn't keep the plot from flagging.One note of difficulty: I listened from CDs and hearing all the "R" names was confusing at first, especially Raoden and Hrathen. It became clearer as the story progressed. A note of information: I also checked out the hardcover book, which I often do with recordings, to help with any missed listening. It had illustrations of the hand gestures used by the former beautiful Elantrians to perform their magic. They are totally unnecessary to understand the story but might be of interest to some readers.A note of interest: On the author's website you can download a short chapter that he uses to explain some of the rapid action at the book's close. Again, totally unnecessary, but some readers felt the author rushed to finish on time and left out some details. Nobody does that do they?Note of mild regret: I forgot I'd read this, so the review is several weeks removed and a bit sketchy.
edecklund on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Somewhat predictable but not totally formulaic. A beautiful city and it's beautiful people suddenly begin to rot and deform. Ten years later, the surrounding cities are still trying to cope with the loss of Elantris's beneficence. Matters worsen with the influence of evil kingdoms, politicians, and religious fanatics. Prince Raoden will fix all this, but, whoa, he gets hit with rot and deformity and is banished to the diseased Elantris. The strength of this book is the strong characterization and the intriguing environment. Even knowing how it would have a happy ending didn't keep the plot from flagging.One note of difficulty: I listened from CDs and hearing all the "R" names was confusing at first, especially Raoden and Hrathen. It became clearer as the story progressed. A note of information: I also checked out the hardcover book, which I often do with recordings, to help with any missed listening. It had illustrations of the hand gestures used by the former beautiful Elantrians to perform their magic. They are totally unnecessary to understand the story but might be of interest to some readers.A note of interest: On the author's website you can download a short chapter that he uses to explain some of the rapid action at the book's close. Again, totally unnecessary, but some readers felt the author rushed to finish on time and left out some details. Nobody does that do they?Note of mild regret: I forgot I'd read this, so the review is several weeks removed and a bit sketchy.
Karlstar on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is a decent fantasy novel with a couple of original concepts. The conflict in the book is mostly political, with a little bit of traditional fantasy violence mixed in, though much less than usual. The kingdom of Arelene used to be ruled and protected by benevolent beings able to make anything with magic, beings that used to be normal people. However, 10 years ago those beings stopped being magical wish granters and instead became something more like ghouls without magical powers. The king's son becomes one himself, and his future arranged wife has to try and keep the kingdom together, protect it from his incompetent father, and save it from religious fanatics. The biggest drawback to this book is that everyone except the princess and the prince are mostl incompetent, which makes it a bit unrealistic. Still a good read.
mohouno on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Even though it was just Disney's "Atlantis:The Lost Empire" retold with a sci-fi touch, I liked it. It kept me hooked, and I liked the whole fighting between religious concept.
krau0098 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read Warbreaker by Sanderson and absolutely loved it. Then I immediately acquired Elantris as well as Sanderson's Mistborn trilogy because I wanted to read more Sanderson. This was a great book and I am so glad that I read it.The story is told from the viewpoint of three different characters. Riorden is the Crown Prince of Arelon and is struck down by the curse of Elantris and thrown into that city to rot with the other Elantrans. Princess Sarene of Teod finds out about Riorden's death on her way to marry him; because of the contract she is considered married even if the other party should die until Riorden's father is no longer ruling. The third viewpoint is from Hrathen, a leader of the Shu-Dereth faith, who is under a deadline to convert Arelon to the Shu-Dereth religion. These three characters maneuver deftly through complex politics in an effort to save Arelon, the people and themselves. Along the way the secret of Elantris is discovered.Sanderson is an exceptionally story teller; and he really excels at these complex epic fantasies. My biggest complaints about some epic fantasies are there are too many people to remember, the plot is too complex to remember, the magic system is confusing, and relationships between the characters are unbelievably dry. Sanderson never runs into these problems; he introduces the people in a way that makes them easy to remember...never once was I confused about who was who. The magic system is explained very well without getting preachy; we discover it along with the characters. The plot is very complex and full of intrigue but Sanderson maneuvers through it with such grace you never have trouble following what is going on.Most importantly Sanderson's characters have heart. At times they may be a little too perfect, but that just endears them to you more. I always thought that the Lord of the Rings could have done better with a little more emotion and love between the characters, same with the Wheel of Time series. I love both of these series dearly, don't get me wrong. Sanderson just gives his characters a penchant for nobility and love that makes them so interesting to read about. There is also some humor thrown in now and then which made this book more fun to read than your typical epic fantasy. I loved that the story was so complete and that it fit into one book, instead of twelve 800 page books. I am impressed with the intelligence behind the plot, the serious moral issues discussed, the humor, the love, the magic...just everything. This book is much like Warbreaker in that is it more about political intrigue than about massive battles.Overall I loved this book. Now I am ready to read the Mistborn trilogy. I also have his Stormlight series on my list to get when it is released. If you love epic fantasy, intrigue, and magic with a touch of romance you will love this book.
wingedpotato on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Top-notch and original fantasy. One of the best I've read in a long time.