Defending a Contested Ideal: Merit and the Public Service Commission, 1908-2008

Defending a Contested Ideal: Merit and the Public Service Commission, 1908-2008

by Luc Juillet, Ken Rasmussen

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Overview

In 1908, after decades of struggling with a public administration undermined by systemic patronage, the Canadian parliament decided that public servants would be selected on the basis of merit, through a system administered by an independent agency: the Public Service Commission of Canada. This history, celebrating the 100th anniversary of the Commission, recounts its unique contribution to the development of an independent public service, which has become a pillar of Canadian parliamentary democracy.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780776606842
Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
Publication date: 09/13/2008
Series: Governance Series , #19
Pages: 264
Product dimensions: 5.00(w) x 7.90(h) x 0.60(d)
Age Range: 15 - 17 Years

About the Author

Luc Juillet is director of the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs at the University of Ottawa.

Ken Rasmussen is director of the Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy at the University of Regina.

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Defending a Contested Ideal: Merit and the Public Service Commission, 1908-2008 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
LynnB on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is a study of Canada's Public Service Commission, and of the merit principle it is charged with upholding. It examines the changing concept of merit, as it grew to extend hiring preference to veterans and to francophones; as it first was used to bar women from most public service jobs and later changed course to embrace employment equity for women, Aboriginal people, ethinic minorities and people with disabilities. It looks at centralized vs decentralized control of staffing, and of merit, in the search for greater efficiency in the public service. And at whether merit is ultimately upheld as a value or through a process.This book is well researched and, for students of public administration, engagingly written.