Copper

Copper

by Kazu Kibuishi

Paperback

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Overview


Copper is curious, Fred is fearful. And together boy and dog are off on a series of adventures through marvelous worlds, powered by Copper's limitless enthusiasm and imagination.
Each Copper and Fred story in this graphic novel collection is a complete vignette, filled with richly detailed settings and told with a wry sense of humor. These two enormously likable characters build ships and planes to travel to surprising destinations and have a knack for getting into all sorts of odd situations.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780545098939
Publisher: Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date: 01/01/2010
Pages: 96
Sales rank: 266,616
Product dimensions: 8.90(w) x 9.08(h) x 0.30(d)
Lexile: GN690L (what's this?)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author


Kazu Kibuishi is the #1 New York Times bestselling and Eisner-nominated creator of the Amulet series, and of a collection of his popular webcomic, Copper. He is also the cover illustrator of the 15th anniversary paperback editions of the Harry Potter series. He lives near Seattle, Washington, with his family. Visit him online at www.boltcity.com.

Customer Reviews

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Copper 3.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
corrylloyd on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
¿Copper¿ by Kazu Kibushi is a humorous comic book about a boy and his dog Fred. They stick together on their little adventures. Copper is the smooth relaxed type where Fred tries to be the sound of reason when they get into a not so great situations. Each page or several pages is one adventure or situation after another. Whether it is surfing with no waves, A maiden voyage that ends with a crash landing or it was all a bad dream, but either way they stick together through it all.This comic book has well developed characters with illustrations that enhance the text as well as brings the characters to life. Copper is comical but also cute. He has a big round head, large round eye and ears that stick out. Fred is a small, round, adorable looking dog. Both illustrations are attractive with their personal characteristics. With the comically attractive illustrations and interesting adventures they would most certainly attract the recommended age group of 2 to 12.
shanda1021 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Summary:This is the story of Copper, an adventurous little boy, and Fred, his dog who lacks the adventurousness and curiosity that Copper has. They always tend to end up in pretty unideal situations.Personal Reaction:I liked this story because it was cute to think of the dog as the little boy's conscience. It wasn't as funny as I like my comics to be but the illustrations were adorable.Classroom Extensions:1. This would be a good book to read a little short story when I need something to take up the few minutes before lunch or the end of the day.2. This book could be read to the class and then have the students write a short story about who might keep them out of trouble, whether it is a sibling, an animal, or an imaginary friend even.
YouthGPL on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Kearsten says: Overall, I'd give this collection a 3 and 1/2, but the step-by-step guide to how Copper is created pushed my rating to a four.Copper and Freg are boy and dog, and each other's best friend. Similar to Calvin & Hobbes, Copper is curious and Fred isn't. At all. The two have many adventures through some truly lovely places, but I found the comics too serious (contemplating a Wall*E landscape, the problems of greed, etc.) for the younger audience it seems aimed at. (It's also lacking the wicked mischievousness and laugh-out-loud humor of C&H.)I'd give this to 6th-8th graders, as they're more likely to get the deeper meanings and catch the ironies.However, I loved the several pages at the end of the book, when Kibuishi details how he draws, inks, letters, scans and colors a page/strip. Fascinating and simple enough to interest younger readers, the step-by-step is a great addition!Recommended.
kayceel on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Overall, i'd give this collection a 3 and 1/2, but the step-by-step guide to how Copper is created pushed my rating to a four.Copper and Freg are boy and dog, and each other's best friend. Similar to Calvin & Hobbes, Copper is curious and Fred isn't. At all. The two have many adventures through some truly lovely places, but I found the comics too serious (contemplating a Wall*E landscape, the problems of greed, etc.) for the younger audience it seems aimed at. (It's also lacking the wicked michieviousness and laugh-out-loud humor of C&H.)I'd give this to 6th-8th graders, as they're more likely to get the deeper meanings and catch the ironies.However, I loved the several pages at the end of the book, when Kibuishi details how he draws, inks, letters, scans and colors a page/strip. Fascinating and simple enough to interest younger readers, the step-by-step is a great addition!Recommended.
ElizaJane on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
A collection of the author/illustrator's first published works which first appeared online as web comics. This collection also includes some new comics and stories plus a special step-by-step section on how the author created the Copper comics. While the majority of comics are one page in length there are a handful which are "story" length covering six or so pages. These are the strange adventures of a little boy, Copper, and his dog, Fred. They venture to strange lands full of mushrooms, fly planes, go underwater, travel by boat, hike, surf and appear in surreal lands full of strange beings. Copper is full of energy, ready to try and do anything on a moment's notice completely carefree. Fred on the other hand, would rather stay home ...safe...but he most go where Copper goes so he is the voice of what could go wrong, he gets scared, he wants to leave, wants to go home, tells Copper the downfalls of his plans, but in the end he's usually won over and sometimes even proven right. They are wonderful characters who contrast each other delightfully. The illustrations are gorgeous, cute, whimsical with drawings I've come to expect form Kibuishi from his Amulet series.My problem with these comics is that I suppose they are meant to be funny. Someone correct me if I'm wrong but that is still the purpose of a comic? Humour, satire, wit? Something to make you chuckle? Well, I simply didn't "get" these comics. I understood what was happening but why it was humorous or witty I haven't a clue. I'll admit there were a couple that made me smile further into the book but seriously on the whole I just seemed to be out of the loop on what was funny here. I really can't see kids appreciating the humour thus I recommend the book for ages 12 and up but even then I wonder. I can only say the humour is extremely esoteric and I am not a member of the club.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think this book is interesting because it has numerous short stories. It is the same characters in different adventures and conversations. If you are into this book you might want to try a book called Amulet. It is by the same author but it is not short stories. Amulet is my favorite book by this author. I am a nine year old girl but boys would like this graphic novel, too.