A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story of Christmas

A Christmas Carol: A Ghost Story of Christmas

by Charles Dickens

NOOK Book(eBook)

$0.99 View All Available Formats & Editions

Available on Compatible NOOK Devices and the free NOOK Apps.
WANT A NOOK?  Explore Now

Overview

Here is the original Christmas classic that is often credited with returning the true spirit of Christmas to the holiday. This edition features the original interior artwork by John Leech. Come spend Christmas with Bob Cratchit, Tiny Tim, Jacob Marley, Ebenezer Scrooge, and all the ghosts of Christmas. Truly a timeless wonder.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781633844971
Publisher: Wilder Publications, Inc.
Publication date: 10/24/2014
Sold by: Barnes & Noble
Format: NOOK Book
Pages: 68
Sales rank: 1,001,039
File size: 2 MB
Age Range: 11 Years

About the Author

Charles Dickens was born in 1812 near Portsmouth, where his father worked as a clerk. Living in London in 1824, Dickens was sent by his family to work in a blacking-warehouse, and his father was arrested and imprisoned for debt. Fortunes improved and Dickens returned to school, eventually becoming a parliamentary reporter. His first piece of fiction was published by a magazine in December 1832, and by 1836 he had begun his first novel, The Pickwick Papers. He focused his career on writing, completing fourteen highly successful novels including Great Expectations, Oliver Twist and Bleak House, as well as penning journalism, shorter fiction and travel books. He died in 1870.
Charles Dickens was born in 1812 near Portsmouth, where his father worked as a clerk. Living in London in 1824, Dickens was sent by his family to work in a blacking-warehouse, and his father was arrested and imprisoned for debt. Fortunes improved and Dickens returned to school, eventually becoming a parliamentary reporter. His first piece of fiction was published by a magazine in December 1832, and by 1836 he had begun his first novel, The Pickwick Papers. He focused his career on writing, completing fourteen highly successful novels, as well as penning journalism, shorter fiction and travel books. He died in 1870.

Date of Birth:

February 7, 1812

Date of Death:

June 18, 1870

Place of Birth:

Portsmouth, England

Place of Death:

Gad's Hill, Kent, England

Education:

Home-schooling; attended Dame School at Chatham briefly and Wellington

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vi

Introduction vii

Preface x

Stave I. Marley’s Ghost 3

Stave II. The First of the Three Spirits 29

Stave III. The Second of the Three Spirits 53

Stave IV. The Last of the Spirits 86

Stave V. The End of It 108

About the Author 119

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See All Customer Reviews

A Christmas Carol (Prestwick House Literary Touchstone Press Series) 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 340 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a great christmas read for all ages. Im 16 and i loved it. There are some typos, but nothing that would make it difficult to understand. I definately would reccomened this book to a friend!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The character Ebeneezer Scrooge has to be one of Dicken's famous characters. In his novella, Dickens portrays a man disappointed with himself and who regards the world with contempt. I always thought of the visits by the three spirits as therapy. Modern pyschology hadn't evolved in the 1840s and somehow Scrooge's breakthrough comes through as a recovered patient. I read that Dickens was a contemporary of Karl Marx and as Marx advocated social change to improve the conditions prevalent during that time, Dickens believed that change could come about by social awareness. Laws could be legislated because society felt compassion. The two children Ignorance and Want, who are hidden under the cloak of the Spirit of Christmas Present were not intended only for plot of the story but as a reminder for Dickens' readers. Are not the 21st century readers still having to think of that boy and girl today? The media presents us news of children in refugee camps,starving children, and homeless families. We are confronted with the reality of want during this time of joy.
missmattie More than 1 year ago
I have always loved this book and began a tradition of reading it to my children when they were young. The writing may not be the peak of Dickens's style but is still excellent. And the story never fails to move and entertain me. This year I read it on my new Nook -- and once again, I thoroughly enjoyed it. I would certainly recommend this book to anyone who likes a good, rousing and touching story and a well-written book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I enjoyed this book! It was mysterious and funny! Great for all ages!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
One of the best books ever.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is awesome! When my teacher read it to us for the hoiliday season! It was what I would say fantastic! I looooooovvvvvvvveeeeeeeeddddddd this book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Its such a good book! What a tridition
matsu More than 1 year ago
This version was crafted with nook's screen in mind.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
BEST BOOK EVER
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Can anyone lend me this book for school? I don't haveh any money to buy it. Thanks!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Classic - Must have!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
What is that about?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
GOOD BOOK!
Daniel.Estes on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I first read Charles Dickens' version of "A Christmas Carol" in my 7th grade English class. The story remains as lyrical now as I first discovered then. I cannot imagine Christmas or literature without it. The tone is nearly perfect watching Ebenezer Scrooge transform from a cold, old miser into a human being desiring another chance to give back to the world.To fully appreciate the language, I recommend listening to it or reading the story aloud.
LibraryLou on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is one of Dickens best stories, and is immortalised in A Muppet Christmas Carol, which I insist everyone watch every Christmas!
jfoster_sf on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This was so much fun to read, especially after watching Mickey's A Christmas Carol so many times I know it by heart=) I'm sure everyone knows the story, so I"ll just say that its one of those books everyone should read, and everyone will love.
rpdan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I've seen the movie countless times; in fact, I've seen countless versions of the book countless times. There's no denying it's a classic in Western Literature; perhaps one of the best-known stories in the English language.Not that anybody's ever read it.I hadn't, up until this year. But last spring I found it at the Borders Going-Out-Of-Business sale, and decided it was about time to hear it as Dickens intended.It's a difficult book to read, both because we're not used to reading Victorian English, and because it's impossible to avoid hearing the voices of Kermit the Frog and Michael Caine and George C. Scott. And yet, it's such a necessary book.It's become important to the pantheon of "necessary items for Christmas," along with "A Christmas Story" and The Carpenters and ugly sweaters. But even more so, I think it's necessary for our world today. It's a little unfortunate that it's become window dressing for the festive season, because the message is entirely prophetic, judgmental, and yet hopeful. It's a message we need once again.I don't need to rehearse the story or themes for you, but think about it for just a second - there's a message here about the proper place of money in relationships, there's a message of the importance of all people, whether they are rich or poor, there's a message about the voluntary redistribution of wealth; but it's all couched in a story of redemption. Yes, there is strong judgment against selfishness and greed (perhaps echoes of the Rich Man and Lazarus), but rather than simply condemn that man, Dickens paints a picture where even the worst can be redeemed and restored. That is a message sadly lacking in the 21st Century.It's interesting to read the story, as so many familiar lines pop off the page; at the same time, there are tender and poignant scenes that I have yet to see in the movie versions; young couples in love, ships' crews huddled in their cold cabin celebrating Christmas far out at sea. The Ghost of Christmas present even gets in a pretty direct shot at the church of Dickens' day.In the end, though, we're left with the familiar story of an angry, bitter, broken man who has all the money in the world but has lost all human connection, and the work of spirits to save him. Dickens reminds us that there is hope for even the worst of sinners, if repentance is found.The bonus of this book is the addition of two lesser-known Christmas tales penned by Dickens - The Chimes, and The Cricket on the Hearth. The Chimes tells us of a broken-down man beset with terrible dreams while (accidentally) locked inside a church steeple; it's a mystic, visionary tale, lacking a bit of the clarity of A Christmas Carol. It's a cold story, and yet hopeful and redemptive. The Cricket on the Hearth is a warmer tale, with brighter characters and (in my opinion) a more interesting story. There's an old cartoon version of this one out there; I remember seeing it some years ago. Like Carol, it can be a little difficult to follow simply due to the Victorian English vernacular, but it's a fun story full of lame dogs and old horses and mysterious strangers and inept babysitters and blind saints and grumpy old men. And yes, in keeping with the others, it brings a surprise redemptive end, complete with a homespun party.So Borders, I'm sorry you went out of business. But your sale finally convinced me to pick this one up, and for that I'm grateful.
jimmaclachlan on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I've read this a couple of times. Dickens was paid by the word & writes like it. He spends way too much time digressing into idiotic areas & filling up space. Example: "Marley was dead, dead as a door nail, although why a door nail should be deader than a coffin nail..." or something like that & goes on about it forever. Never does come to a conclusion - the proper one being a door nail is dead because it was hammered through the door & clinched on the opposite side, hence is dead. Coffin nails are hammered straight in, hence can move with the wood. His stories are classics, but I detest his writing style. Probably worth reading once.
mysteena on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
When I read Dickens, I'm continually tempted to read bits and pieces aloud to Chris. Dickens has such a beautiful writing style, it practically begs to be read out loud. Beautiful story. I hope to make this a new tradition in my life and read it every year.
bexaplex on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Illustrations by Everett Shinn are a bit weird; his Scrooge looks like an evil elf.
Maydacat on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Some tales are meant to read aloud, and never is this statement truer than when it is applied to "A Christmas Carol." One would be hard pressed to find anyone would does not like this perennial story, and we all have our special favorites, be they illustrated texts or even movies. But everyone should add this audio version to his or her collection. Award-winning Jim Dale renders a masterful performance in this unabridged version which can be enjoyed at any time of the year.
yukiko on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This book is very good.And it is very timely.
isabelx on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The ChimesThe Haunted ManThe Cricket on the HearthThe Battle of LifeA Christmas CarolI read this collection of stories 3 years ago for a Book Club and we all agreed that none of the other stories is a patch on "A Christmas Carol".I did enjoy "The Cricket on the Hearth", a suspenseful story of possible infidelity, and "The Chimes", which was written a year after "A Christmas Carol" and has a similar story, with Trotty who has supposedly fallen to his death from the church bell tower is shown three future New Years by the spirits of the chimes and the ghost of a young girl who dies in one of those future visions.The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain is the third story in this book in which various types of spirit show the protagonist the error of his ways.And a final piece of advice - Don't start by reading "The Battle of Life" like I did, as it's possibly the most annoying story I have ever read!
john257hopper on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Christmas BooksOnly A Christmas Carol is worth re- reading from this collection. 4/5A Christmas CarolAs timeless a classic as ever at Christmas. The ultimate secular story about redemption.The ChimesThis had some interesting things to say about class divisions in mid-19th century England, but delivered without the author's usual charm and warmth. This was very bleak until the last two pages. Worse than that, though, it was confusing. It also isn't a Christmas story, though it is a new year's eve one.The Cricket on the HearthCouldn't get into this. Interesting portrayal of a blind character, but overall too dull and I gave up on it.
SimonW11 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
If only I had been there to offer advice Charles Dickens could have been a truly great author. This read as part of the reading group, where it produced the best discussion for some time. Charles Dickens combined an incredible talent for characterisation with the self indulgence that can marr a rich and popular author. If only a writing group had been there to repeat the basic mantras ¿show not tell¿ and so on.