ISBN-10:
1934555649
ISBN-13:
9781934555644
Pub. Date:
03/04/2009
Publisher:
Valancourt Books
Carmilla

Carmilla

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Overview

Carmilla by Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781934555644
Publisher: Valancourt Books
Publication date: 03/04/2009
Series: Valancourt Classics
Edition description: New Edition
Pages: 196
Sales rank: 268,812
Product dimensions: 5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.45(d)

About the Author

Joseph Thomas Sheridan Le Fanu was an Irish writer who was born on 28 August 1814 in Dublin and who died on 7 February 1873 in the same city. He is known mainly for his stories of mystery and terror.
His personal life was complicated due to the illness of his wife, who suffered from an anxiety crisis and an advanced neurosis that apparently cost him his life in 1858. Le Fanu stopped writing, tormented by the death of his wife, and did not return to do so until the death of his mother in 1861, supported by his cousin, Lady Gifford, with whom he corresponded until her death. By owning the Dublin University Magazine, he took advantage to publish in this magazine his novels

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Carmilla 3.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 31 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I haven't really read any other vampire books, but I really enjoyed this. The author did a great job of creating an eeire atmosphere. I reccomend it to anyone who likes creepy stories. Oh, and I read this in a couple of hours...
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A hauntingly descriptive book....but in such a beautiful way. Definitely worth a read if you are questioning it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read about 80 books a year. Most are reference. Sometimes, a novel comes with such a wonderful recomendation, that I will make the attempt and commit to the first chapter. A Vampyre Tale was everything promised. I could not put Carmilla down until I had finished it. It is a well told story that uses brilliant language and vivid discriptions. I have not read very many vampyre tales, but I have read a great deal of good books. This is one of the better narratives for its time (1872?). Brilliant and enchanting, this book draws the reader into the romance and deception that are required for a vampyre to survive. The enraged father that realizes his daughter was taken by a vampyre posing as a friend, and his relentless work at tracking down the monster are a great addition to the story. In the end of the story, I felt bad for everyone involved. It will make you think. It will test your vocabulary and your appreciation for a well turned piece of prose. I highly recomend it.
sweetiegherkin on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
One of the earliest English-language works on vampires, Carmilla tells the story of a young and beautiful female vampire who preys on other young and beautiful women. The story is told from the point of view of Laura, one of Carmilla's potential victims, from the distance of several years after her initial acquaintance with Carmilla when Laura was just 18 years old. A seemingly chance event lands Carmilla at the doorstep of the out-of-the-way castle where Laura lives with her father. Laura and her father immediately offer shelter to Carmilla as dictated by the code of hospitability but also because their solitary lifestyle leaves Laura with few companions her own age. Carmilla and Laura become fast friends, aided by the idea both hold of having met each other before in a strange dreamlike occurrence when they were mere children. At times, the companionship between the two seems like more than just friendship, particularly on the side of the seductive Carmilla. (Laura once briefly contemplates that Carmilla is a young man in disguise because of her seemingly amorous attentions to Laura). All seems well at first until a strange sickness strikes the nearby village, in which women begin wasting away after they claim to see a ghost in the night who pricks their bosoms. Laura, too, becomes afflicted with some unknown melancholic illness. Before long, the cause of Laura's affliction is surmised and subsequently Carmilla's secret is revealed --- she is a vampire! This book is horror more in line with E.A. Poe's works than Stephen King's books, so it may seem mild to today's readers. However, it was perfect for someone like me, who prefers not to be scared witless when reading. I can't help but wonder if the story¿s subtitle ("A Vampyre Tale") were not included, the story would be even more suspenseful as Carmilla's true identity would then be less predictable. The writing style is beautiful, as seen in Laura¿s descriptions of the things around her using clear and precise language that is also sumptuous in its own way and, in particular, in Carmilla's hauntingly seductive lines to Laura. The characters of Laura and Carmilla are both very interesting, and Carmilla is especially entrancing. The ending is perhaps a bit too tidy and could have been fleshed out more. As others have mentioned, there are still some questions remaining at the end, such as who the woman masquerading as Carmilla's mother really is. However, it is altogether an engrossing read, and the novella is also of interest for its historic place in the tradition of the vampire story.
jcbrunner on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Austria gave the world the Terminator and nearly became the vampire motherland too. Bram Stoker at first had Dracula situated in Styria but, fortunately for Austria, switched to Transylvania. The inspiration of the Styrian location came from Le Fanu whose gothic short story about an Austrian lesbian vampire already covers many of the classic elements of vampire fiction. Similar to Stoker, Le Fanu still shows some uncertainty about the powers and restrictions of a vampire. In view of later works, the story is not without clumsy elements and a rather weak resolution. As a pioneering work, it remains highly readable. Englishmen abroad, beware of what your impressionable daughters do during the night.
t1bnotown on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this because it was one of the readings for my husband's "Vampires in Literature" class, and, although I thought I'd hate it from the slow beginning, it picked up considerably. The characters were so unwilling to believe the obvious, which I guess says something about how people considered themselves beyond superstition. I did not think it was a "lesbian" vampire tale- women kissed each other back then. I did find it interesting that Carmilla was able to be around in the sunlight.
thioviolight on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read another collection of Le Fanu's stories late last year, and some of the stories from that book overlap with this one. Like the previous book, it took a bit of effort for me to read because of the language, but the stories were mostly chilling. What truly stands out for me, however, was the title story Carmilla, a classic vampire tale pre-dating Bram Stoker's Dracula. The story is sensual and compelling, and it is easy to see why it's become a classic! (Incidentally, I bought the book 12 years ago, at the height of my vampire obsession, just for that story.)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love modern vampire books that don't involve frills and glitter, if you know what I mean, so I decided to give a story that was written in the later half of the 18th century. I was not disappointed! I will admit the english was a bit hard to follow with it being 18th century style but it gave an air of elegance and mystery that modern english would not to this spooky vampire tale! It is not much money at all and if you are looking for a good quick read, check this one out!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Owning an audiobook version from Librivox, I often listen to this story while falling asleep. It's a little bit of a guilty pleasure for me, as I can't shake off the notion that it's target audience wasn't exactly males. Having read the "Not PG" review, I felt it was necessary to share some of my own thoughts on the book. Mostly to balance other reviews and not as much to review it myself. This isn't a horror story as most would understand the term. Most of the story reads as a friendship between two girls, Laura, the daughter of a semi-nobleman and her houseguest, the beautiful but odd Carmilla. They pass most of the story as friends in a remote "schloss" (a small castle as far as I imagine) enjoying each others company while Laura's health slowly declines. There's a definite atmosphere, but calling it haunting or erotic isn't exactly the truth. It seems to linger between creepy and pleasant. I would go so far as to say there ARE slight lesbian undertones, but only on a platonic level (if that makes any sense at all) Carmilla on occasion goes on how much she loves her friend, in a way that only a gothic vampire could. As I mostly fall asleep before the final chapters, in my mind it remains a story about two young girls with a friendship that is very deep and rewarding for both, but quite taxing and possibly fatal for one.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Predating the classic 'Dracula', this book does not disappoint. Everyone at some point in their life needs to read this story and get a taste of the original vampires. No sparkling, werewolf fighting vampires here. Just a wonderful story about two girls; one who happens to be a vampire. Also a very short read!
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