The Black Pearl (Morland Dynasty Series #5)

The Black Pearl (Morland Dynasty Series #5)

by Cynthia Harrod-Eagles

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Overview

1659: Cromwell's protectorate is drawing to a close, and the restoration of the monarchy can only improve the fortunes of the Morland family. The years of civil war and their aftermath have left Morland Place in dire straits, but with the return of the King, Ralph Morland believes he can rebuild the family estates. For his beautiful and ambitious cousin, Annunciata, the Restoration means a journey to London - one that leads to the amours and intriges of Charles's court and to the unlocking of her mysterious past.

A new and kinder age is dawning - a time for healing wounds - but more uncertainty, conflict and sorrow await both Ralph and Annunciata before they can find peace and forgiveness.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9780751506426
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Publication date: 06/28/1994
Series: Morland Dynasty Series , #5
Pages: 416
Sales rank: 545,739
Product dimensions: 4.50(w) x 7.00(h) x 1.00(d)

About the Author

Cynthia Harrod-Eagles is the author of the hugely popular Morland Dynasty novels, which have captivated and enthralled readers for decades. She is also the author of the contemporary Bill Slider mystery series, as well as her new series, War at Home, which is an epic family drama set against the backdrop of World War I. Cynthia's passions are music, wine, horses, architecture and the English countryside.

Table of Contents

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The Black Pearl (Morland Dynasty Series #5) 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
AdonisGuilfoyle on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I think I left too long a breathing space between instalments this time, and therefore spent the first half of the novel 'catching up' with the Morland clan, but Cynthia Harrod-Eagle's fluid narrative and easy grasp of history soon welcomed me back to the fold. The Black Pearl is the fifth book in the series, but apart from a few tangled family ties, the novels can be read individually. This chapter covers the Restoration in 1660 to the Great Fire in 1666, and is centred around the superbly named Annunciata Morland, a beautiful and wilful child, who matures into a pale imitation of Katharine Winsor's Forever Amber and leaves Yorkshire for the Royal Court in London. I quite liked Annunciata, even if she didn't quite live up to her reputation as an 'incorrigible rougue, thoroughly selfish and unscrupulous'. There is nothing quite so wicked or dangerous in Annunciata, merely another strong woman in a line of strong women. And I'm always amazed at the, no doubt historically accurate, lives of the characters in Harrod-Eagle's Dynasty - at the tender age of nineteen, Annunciata has been married twice, had three children and risen to the top rung of the social ladder in London, and poor old 'uncle' Ralph is only thirty! I know people died younger, and so had to start living earlier, but my modern brain still has difficulty computing the difference between then and now.My memory also struggled with the identity of Annunciata's father, too - who's the daddy? I definitely remember one illicit liaison towards the end of book four, but don't recall any confusion afterwards. Oh dear, I shall have to make sure I read the next novel while this one is still fresh in my mind!Entertaining and instructive as always - heartily recommended.
Kasthu on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
On the eve of the Restoration, the Morland family, led by Ralph, finds itself in reduced circumstances, and eager to regain lost property once King Charles returns to take his throne. Annunciata, age 15, has higher aspirations than marriage to her cousin Kit; and she goes to London, to take part in court life there. This was my introduction to the Morland Dynasty, and I have to say that it didn't disappoint! Harrod-Eagles makes English history accessible while at the same time creating an engaging, entertaining plot and characters. Although there are characters in The Black Pearl that appeared in The Oak Apple, I found that it wasn't completely necessary to read them first--although I will, since the series is such a treat.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago