Around the World in Eighty Days

Around the World in Eighty Days

by Jules Verne
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Overview

Jules Verne Great excitement and awe greeted its publication in 1873, and today Around the World in Eighty Days remains Jules Verne’s most successful novel. A daring wager by the eccentric and mysterious Englishman Phileas Fogg that he can circle the globe in just eighty days initiates this marvelous travelogue and exciting suspense story. Together with his manservant, Passepartout, Fogg makes a breathless world tour, overcoming wild misadventures and finding time to rescue a beautiful Indian maharani from a burning funeral pyre—all the while restlessly pursued by a bumbling detective called Mr. Fix. Realistically utilizing nearly every means of transportation known in the 1870s, Around the World in Eighty Days generated enchantment with scientific progress—and its delightful mixture of fantasy, comedy, and dazzling suspense has kept it a perennially superb entertainment.

Product Details

ISBN-13: 9781365138416
Publisher: Lulu.com
Publication date: 05/24/2016
Pages: 172
Product dimensions: 6.10(w) x 9.10(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range: 8 - 12 Years

About the Author

Jules Verne was born into a family with a seafaring tradition in Nantes, France in 1828. Verne was sent to Paris to study law, but once there, he quickly fell in love with the theater. He was soon writing plays and opera librettos, and his first play was produced in 1850. When he refused his father's entreaties to return to Nantes and practice law, his allowance was cut off, and he was forced to make his living by selling stories and articles. Soon he was turning out imaginative stories such as Five Weeks in a Balloon (1863), Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864), and From the Earth to the Moon (1865), which were immensely popular all over the world. His ability to envision the next stage in man's technological progress produced 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea (1870) and Michael Strogoff (1876). His biggest success came with Around the World in Eighty Days (1872). Verne's books made him famous and rich. In 1876, he bought a large steam yacht in which he could write more comfortably than on shore. His books were widely translated, dramatized, and later filmed. He died in Amiens in 1905.

Date of Birth:

February 8, 1828

Date of Death:

March 24, 1905

Place of Birth:

Nantes, France

Place of Death:

Amiens, France

Education:

Nantes lycée and law studies in Paris

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I
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Excerpted from "Around the World in Eighty Days"
by .
Copyright © 2015 Jules Verne.
Excerpted by permission of Penguin Publishing Group.
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Table of Contents

Chapter 1 In which Phileas Fogg and Passepartout accept each other, the one as master, the other as man 1

Chapter 2 In which Passepartout is convinced that he has at last found his ideal 7

Chapter 3 In which a conversation takes place which seems likely to cost Phileas Fogg dear 12

Chapter 4 In which Phileas Fogg astounds Passepartout, his servant 21

Chapter 5 In which a new species of funds, unknown to the moneyed men, appears on 'Change 26

Chapter 6 In which Fix, the detective, betrays a very natural impatience 30

Chapter 7 Which once more demonstrates the uselessness of passports as aids to detectives 36

Chapter 8 In which Passepartout talks rather more, perhaps, than is prudent 40

Chapter 9 In which the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean prove propitious to the designs of Phileas Fogg 45

Chapter 10 In which Passepartout is only too glad to get off with the loss of his shoes 51

Chapter 11 In which Phileas Fogg secures a curious means of conveyance at a fabulous price 58

Chapter 12 In which Phileas Fogg and his companions venture across the Indian forests, and what ensued 68

Chapter 13 In which Passepartout receives a new proof that fortune favours the brave 77

Chapter 14 In which Phileas Fogg descends the whole length of the beautiful valley of the Ganges without ever thinking of seeing it 85

Chapter 15 In which the bag of bank-notes disgorges some thousands of pounds more 93

Chapter 16 In which Fix does not seem to understand in the least what is said to him 101

Chapter 17 Showing what happened on the voyage from Singapore to Hong Kong 108

Chapter 18 In which Phileas Fogg, Passepartout, and Fix go each about his business 115

Chapter 19 In which Passepartout takes a too great interest in his master, and what comes of it 121

Chapter 20 In which Fix comes face to face with Phileas Fogg 130

Chapter 21 In which the master of the "Tankadere" runs great risk of losing a reward of two hundred pounds 138

Chapter 22 In which Passepartout finds out that, even at the antipodes, it is convenient to have some money in one's pocket 148

Chapter 23 In which Passepartout's nose becomes outrageously long 156

Chapter 24 During which Mr. Fogg and party cross the Pacific Ocean 164

Chapter 25 In which a slight glimpse is had of San Francisco 172

Chapter 26 In which Phileas Fogg and party travel by the Pacific Railroad 180

Chapter 27 In which Passepartout undergoes, at a speed of twenty miles an hour, a course of Mormon history 187

Chapter 28 In which Passepartout does not succeed in making anybody listen to reason 195

Chapter 29 In which certain incidents are narrated which are only to be met with on American railroads 205

Chapter 30 In which Phileas Fogg simply does his duty 214

Chapter 31 In which Fix the detective considerably furthers the interests of Phileas Fogg 223

Chapter 32 In which Phileas Fogg engages in a direct struggle with bad fortune 230

Chapter 33 In which Phileas Fogg shows himself equal to the occasion 235

Chapter 34 In which Phileas Fogg at last reaches London 245

Chapter 35 In which Phileas Fogg does not have to repeat his orders to Passepartout twice 249

Chapter 36 In which Phileas Fogg's name is once more at a premium on 'Change 256

Chapter 37 In which it is shown that Phileas Fogg gained nothing by his tour around the world, unless it were happiness 261

Reading Group Guide

1. Having been born into a family that had made their living from the sea, Jules Verne spent his early years in a seaport town. When he was still young, Verne himself became a cabin boy on a merchant ship. In what ways do you think these elements of the author’s own life may have influenced Around the World in Eighty Days?

2. Verne became very involved with theater while studying law in Paris and is the author of many plays. What elements in this novel do you think came out of Verne’s theatrical experiences? After Eighty Days was published, Verne received many requests to dramatize the work. Do you think the book has particularly theatrical elements that would lead to its adaptation as a play?

3. Around the World in Eighty Days is considered one of the most popular adventure novels of all time. What do you think of this characterization and how would you compare it to contemporary adventure novels and films? What elements of the adventure genre have changed over time, and where do you think today’s adventure authors owe a debt to Verne?

4. Although the story begins in London, it eventually spans the entire globe. Despite the international setting, this book is distinctly British in many ways. Why might Verne have chosen a protagonist that is so quintessentially British, while the author himself was French?

5. Verne had an avid interest in science, particularly geology and geography, and was somewhat of an inventor. After having read Around the World in Eighty Days, does it surprise you that Verne is considered by many to be the father of science fiction? Where do you think Verne’s scientific expertise adds to the story?

6. For Verne, the world is shrinking; exploration has given way to tourism and imperialism. In his Introduction, Bruce Sterling argues that comments on globalization in Eighty Days are particularly relevant today. Would you agree? What evidence can you find to support this, and what lessons do you think we can learn from this novel today?

7. In many ways, Verne’s tale is one about the future, and many of his ideas have come to pass. Now that it is relatively easy to go around the world in eighty days, why is this tale still entertaining and relevant?

8. Many of the characters in the novel have names that in some way illuminate their roles. Why do you think Verne chose to call his hero Fogg, the detective Fix, and the assistant Passepartout, which means skeleton key in French?

9. Why do you think the hero, the mysterious Phileas Fogg, accepts the bet to travel the globe in eighty days?

10. When the book was written, the Parsee Indian Aouda represented the unknown and the exotic, but in many ways she is the character that the modern reader finds most familiar. Do you think this is true? In what ways is she now more modern than many of the other characters?

11. The precise and very British Phileas Fogg and his valet, the comic and very French Passepartout, are strikingly different characters. In what ways do their differences help to elucidate their individual character traits? Why does Verne include this relationship? Most of the time Passepartout is more a hindrance to his employer than helpful. Why do you think Fogg keeps him? In what ways does he serve to advance the plot, particularly with Aouda?

12. In many ways, Fogg’s travels are more than just a race around the world but a quest, one in which the hero returns somehow transformed. Do you think Fogg’s character is changed when he returns to London at the end of the challenge?

13. At the conclusion of the novel, the narrator asserts that Phileas Fogg in his journey has gained nothing but a charming woman, who, strange as it may appear, made him the happiest of men! Verne seems to be making the point that love and human relationships are more important than winning bets or other material gains. Do you think that the rest of the novel would support this assertion? If not, why might Verne have included it?

Customer Reviews

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Around the World in Eighty Days (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 302 reviews.
seeGreen More than 1 year ago
I recently reread this book for this first time since I had to in school, many years ago. Although it seems a fairly simplistic read, it still has a plot, while plausible and adventures, also plausible, that kept me wanting to keep reading it and finish the entire story. Phileus Fogg and his servent Passeportout make up the main characters, almost in an odd couple styling. Traveling by any means necessary to win a bet (not the money, but the honor) they are constantly playing off of each other with their conflicting attitudes. I would recommend this for any young reader, it is a classic and easy to read and quick as well. For an older reader or an adult, in today's view it can seem simplistic and dated, and unchallenged, but it is still a great work by Jules Verne. To anyone who hasn't read it, go for it, you have nothing to lose except a couple hours in which you can be with the imagery and travel to Egypt, India, Japan, American and back to London in a simpler time, yet many of the problems put into the path of Fogg, one can relate to today in their modern versions.
Jeff Sebest More than 1 year ago
I would reccomend this book to anyone
Tonya Snyder More than 1 year ago
it was an interesting book but dont watch movie before reading.
Boys-on-a-boat More than 1 year ago
To start off, this is a classic book. If this was a badly written book, I don't think it would be a classic. Around the World in Eighty Days tells the adventures of Phileas Fogg, a man who made a wager of twenty thousand pounds that he could go all the way around the world in exactly eighty days. And sorry to say, Jackie Chan does not help him along the way. The author Jules Verne writes the book to a certain perspective that comes from almost every main character's point of veiw. In addition to the main plot, their is a suspenseful subplot in which a clever Detective Fix snoops out Mr. Fogg, who is a suspect for the theft of fifty thousand pounds! The book is rich with character developement. Phileas and his servant Passepartout show great change throughout their journey. Also, a love story evolves as Fogg meets Aouda, an Indian woman who was about to be sacrified by a thuggee tribe, until Fogg and his crew came to the rescue! Now we get to this edition of the novel. Really it adds nothing but an introduction by James Hynes. The intro is well written but unnecassary, it slows down the suspense you have when you open up to the first page. One plus to this edition is the cover illustration. It features a man in a hot air balloon and a map of the world in the background. The problem is that Phileas Fogg does not travel once in this book by hot air balloon or any form of air transportation for that matter. Over all you want to get this book. However you could probably find a much nicer edition of it.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Highly Recommended - you must check it out!!
Guest More than 1 year ago
This great novel by Jules Verne is about an Englishman who makes a bet that he can travel around the world in eighty days. Jules Verne describes the protagonist's journey through the American plains in great detail but his ability to describe these legendary plains does not compare to seeing them with your own eyes. As I have already seen them, I found these sections of description rather dull. For instance when he stated that they 'observed the varied landscape which unfolded itself as they passed along; the vast prairies, the mountains lining the horizon, and the creeks with their frothy, foaming streams'. I found this not to portray the real essence of the plains as I found the plains to feel as if they go on forever. Verne's description does not show the real vastness of the plains. It does not describe a real picture of the towering mountains, plains or the streams. I would describe the plains to go on as far as the eye can see. The yellowish-brown fields surrounded by fences, stretching out for miles and miles, with no trees to be seen. I sensed a stronger feeling of being the only thing in the entire plains. His words do not seem to be expressive enough to me. In another segment along their long journey, the protagonist, Phileas Fogg, suggests that he and his friends rescue an Indian princess from death. This is a courageous act on his part and on the part of his partners. They secretly hide behind bushes near the large group of people where the princess is to be burned alive next to her dead husband. They attempt to break into the room where the unconscious princess is hidden but have to rush back to their hiding spot to escape from the guards. At dawn, just before the princess is to be killed, Passepartout, the courageous, brave, servant of Phileas Fogg, inconspicuously races up to the princess. Then, waiting for the right moment, he jumps up out of the flames where her dead husband lies, saves the princess, creating the illusion that the Prince returned to the living and rescued his wife. This act shows Passepartout's bravery and courage. Passepartout, without any second thoughts, risked his life for the princess he had never met before. This act is very courageous indeed. Jules Verne's ability to portray a character's thoughts and actions through his writings, as was just demonstrated, makes this book of great value. This is a great book because it shows you what things are like in different parts of the world, as I described in the previous paragraphs. It has a thrilling, adventurous plot, along with characters that are almost real. All these ingredients put together make a great book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Haha this book was nothing like the movie... it was even better!!!!!!!!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a wonderful book! It is a bit slow at first, but give it a few chapters and you'll really get into it. Also, as opposed o most free books, it is not so full of typos that you can hardly read it. There are a few but not many.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Phileas Fogg, a somewhat rich London man makes a bet of 20000 euros with the people of the reform club that he could travel around the world in 80 days. While he does that, the reform club makes him look guilty and a spy is chasing him. He used lots of different types of tools to travel including some that you don’t see often. One of the transportation tools that I thought was interesting was a wagon powered by wind. I thought that Phileas is really stupid to make that bet because at last, he only gains a profit of about 200 euros while arriving at the last second and sacrificing a several dogs promising a taxi driver 200 euros. Around the world in 80 days is a very interesting book. I would suggest this book to anyone who enjoys adventurous books.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I think the descriptions of the charectors are nery good and i reccomend this book to anyone with a thirst of adventure and does not mind all the punctual errors and for it being old timey. I also reccomend the movie. Just search , around the world in eighty days staring jackie chan. :3
Nautilus More than 1 year ago
The daring quest of Phileas Fogg to travel the world within 80 days with twenty-thousand pounds sterlings of his fortune at stake that comes down to the wire. It is definitely one of those books that everyone should read within their life time.
Mariamosis More than 1 year ago
Contrary to what many people (who have not read this book) believe and despite the cover of many printings of this book: There is NO hot-air-balloon in this book. This false belief has been instilled in us through modern media. However, without the hot-air-balloon and bullfighting (?), this book is still a fascinating tale of adventure. Even so, if you are looking for a quick fix for a book report I encourage the reader to go beyond the illustrated cover and movie to find a copy of Jule's Verne's "Around the World in Eighty Days" and read it. And furthermore, SparkNotes should be reviewed in hindsight.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Jules Verne¿s Around the World in Eighty Days, Phileas Fogg begins his journey in London and travels throughout the world. Fogg makes a wager of 20,000 pounds that he can travel the world in eighty days. Passepartout, his servant travels alongside him with Detective Fix close on their trail because he suspects that Fogg is the robber of the Bank of England. Their fast paced journey takes them through many obstacles like battling with Indians, racing through the jungle, and saving the beautiful princess Aouda. Personally I thought this novel was quite a good book. It was very creative, I enjoyed reading it, and it kept me on my toes throughout the whole book. I thought it was very exciting because there was one obstacle after the next and they never seemed to stop the race against time. The only thing I did not like about this novel is that Jules Verne puts so much detail about the setting and cultures that Fogg visits, it starts to get boring in some places.I would recommend this book to anybody who likes adventures and to people who like to learn about the different places around the world. I think this book is a good read for people of all ages and is packed with action, suspense, and adventure in this trip around the world.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne is a story about a man named Phileas Fogg who lived by a routine schedule. Fogg had just fired his man servant for not bringing him his water for shaving at the right temperature of 86 degrees Fahrenheit but instead at 84 degrees Fahrenheit. Fogg gets another man servant named Jean Passepartout who is going to travel around the world in eighty days with Mr. Fogg but does not know it yet. The bet all started when Phileas Fogg went to the Reform Club for his daily routine. He had his meal, read, had his meal, and then played whist with his fellow reform members. The other reform members are debating on whether of not the thief who stole money from the Bank of London could escape easily. That is when Phileas Fogg says that it is possible, and bets half of his fortune-20,000 pounds- that it is possible. He walks calmly home and tells Passepartout to get everything ready in 10 minutes because they are leaving for Dover and Calais. Fogg and Passepartout go on their way, but Detective Fix wishes to arrest Phileas Fogg because he thinks Fogg robbed the Bank of London. They face many difficulties, but Phileas Fogg still had his confidence and calm ways. From trains to ships to an elephant, from being beaten for wearing shoes in a sacred place by accident to saving damsels in distress from being sacrificed all the way to being attacked on a train by the Souix. Jules Verne does a beautiful job describing the beauty and the horror of the countries Fogg, Passepartout, and Aouda face off against. I really enjoyed this book because it had comedy, adventure, and science involved in the lives of many people, and how one man set out to show that it was possible to go around the world in eighty days and the other a servant along for the ride.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This marvelous book by Jules Verne is a must for every book lover everywhere! Mr. Phileas Fogg, an English gentleman, sets his whole life to the time of his watch. Every morning he gets up and goes to the reform club to play cards with his chums. Well one day, his friends and Phileas Fogg gets into a discussion and out of nowhere he bets his whole life savings he can make it around the world in 80 days. It was thought to be impossible by everyone but Phileas Fogg as determined to prove everyone wrong. So right away his new servant, Mr. Passepartout, and Phileas Fogg set out on their very exciting adventure around the world. The only thing that can stop them now is a detective, Detective Fix, who thinks that Mr. Phileas Fogg is the man that robbed a bank in London. Mr. Fix travels on his adventure to stop him at all cost. I am not going to give out anything else about they¿re daring, ride around the world but your sure can bet it is going to be very exciting. I believe this was a very interesting tale from beginning to end with a bunch of surprises along the way such as an Indian princess that will be killed if Mr. Fogg doesn¿t put a foot in to stop it. You never know what Jules Verne had up his sleeve every turning of the page, you knew it was going to be good but never knew what. After the first two chapters I never put it down to the end! This was certainly a book that kept you on the edge of your seat with every word read. I think his setting of the 1800¿s and the English characters certainly added a little something to the mix to make it even better! All of his characters had there own special place in the story, which made it all come together. Also how he used the language of that time period made you feel like you was in the 1800¿s in the reform club talking about his adventure with Mr. Fogg. Then he used a lot of different things to make you feel like you were right there on Mr. Phileas Fogg¿s right side. All of this made this book one of the best I have every read. All in all, this was a wonderful book that I think was very exciting and mysterious all in one! I defiantly think anyone who is thinking about reading this book should and even if you aren¿t still read it. I know that after the first two chapters you will be hooked like I was!
Guest More than 1 year ago
In the novel, Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne, Phileas Fogg a determined Englishman, made a possibly life changing bet with his cronies. He bet that he could travel the entire globe in 80 days. Many people believed that Mr. Fogg could not circumnavigate the world in such a short period of time. I thought that this challenge could be met if everything could be perfectly executed. then the probability of an accident or mishap came to mind and just one problem could throw the whole schedule off track. Phileas Fogg had the trip planned out, even with the probability of an accident in mind. Could he make the journey and reach London to recieve his money at quarter to nine in the evening on December 21st? I had my doubts in the man's plan just like many other readers. With great determination, Phileas Fogg set out on his trek around the world. Mr. Fogg traveled with his gracious servant Passepartout close to his side and a snoopy detective, Mr. Fix, hot on his trail. Mr. Fogg had been accused of robbing a bank in England. Mr. Fix, planning to arrest Phileas Fogg in India, was averted due to the delay of the warrant. The three traveled to India, saving a beautiful princess from her death, and on to China and Japan. Inconveniences occured with delay, the travelers missing a steamer after steamer they needed to take in order to make time. Aouda, the princess, now accompanied the three. They wisked across teh Pacific onto trains in the United States. When a band of Sioux Indians attacked the train, they took Passepartout prisoner. Mr. Fogg retrieved his servent and continued on their journey. With the undying determination that kept the travelers on their way, and ventured onto the Atlantic Ocean. In England, Fix arrested Mr. Fogg not knowing the robber had been caught. Phileas Fogg and his companions arrived in London thinking they were late. The catch was that they were a day early, thus making the journey around the world in eight days. He didn't lose or gain any money but did take Aouda as his wife. Mr. Fogg kept his calm and keen composure throughout the journey. He dismissed his orderly ways after finding out he had been late. This was one of the only changes that Phileas Fogg went through on his journey. I thought this story was excellent inteh way Jules Verne presented the world as Phileas Fogg traveled upon it. I enjoyed reading the novel and understanding the many different ways of life throughout the world. I would recommend this novel to anybody who wants to read an entertaining novel about many different parts of the world.
soylentgreen23 on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
You know the story and so forth, but what you might not know (unless you are psychic or I already told you) is that this book had a life-changing effect on me.One has to read the right books at the right time, especially in childhood. Frankly, one has to read in childhood - this point is critical. I read this beautiful little novel, and for a time the world lay stretched out before me, a perfect little world full of adventure just waiting to be explored.The more I think about it, the more I'm sure that it was this book that caused me to become so obsessed with travel. I've always dreamt of far-away places, and having read this book during my formative years, and having loved every page, there's a strong possibility that I owe Verne my very ambitions. Thank you, sir.
Prop2gether on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
Great fun to read, although the cover is incorrect (showing camels). Interesting to note because the Barnes and Noble book jackets talks about the "wrongness" of the balloon in the Fifties film version. Fast paced, full of action, and why did I not read it years ago!
jwhenderson on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this in Jr. High School and fell in love with Verne's novels. In 1872 Phileas Fogg wagers that he can circle the earth in eighty days; and traveling by steamer, railway, carriage, sledge, and elephant he wins his bet in seventy-nine days, twenty-three hours, and fifty-seven minutes. Verne builds the suspense and populates the book with strange places and characters that makes it difficult to put down. I would recommend this to dreamers and readers of all ages.
cbl_tn on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
This is the ultimate travel tale. It's full of adventure and suspense spiced with humor and romance. It's lighthearted fun, yet it touches on social issues of its era such as the status and treatment of women in India and opium use in China.It's interesting that, while there are lots of characters in the book, there is only one female. Her character is less developed than the male characters, and she has a mostly passive role in the action. I don't read many adventure novels, and I haven't read any of Verne's other books, so perhaps this is typical of the genre.This story lends itself well to reading aloud or listening to on audio. I listened to an audio version on a road trip and it made the time pass quickly.
BryJSmi on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
The book "Around the World in 80 Days" by Jules Verne is a decent book. It is very slow in the beginning and has annoying old words. As the story progesses it gets a little better, but still not very good. The book is about a guy (Phileas Fogg) who bets he can make it around the world in 80 days. The book is just a boring account of the stuff he does. This book is very slow and boring and is not recommended to read unless you need to.
ElizaJane on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I read this book for the first as a read-aloud to my son when he was about 12. We were rivetted, on the edge of our seats. Excitement and humour, a must read.
OtwellS on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I liked the story but I was not thrilled about the Illustrated Classics. It was too simple and too basic for me. I enjoyed the action but I felt like a lot was left out to ensure this was set up for juvenile literature and I really think that it could have kept some of the more exciting parts fluffed out rather than condensing it down to the bare bones. All in all, I liked the story and the overall plot. Again, a good many parts were too simple and to me seemed to run very quickly. I would recommend this AS a juvenile literature, but if you are reading this to kind of get an idea about what the story is about, what I was doing, then you are better off just reading the real book and not wasting your time with this.
Clurb on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
My favourite of all Verne's stuff. Fast paced, funny and exciting.
VirginiaGill on LibraryThing More than 1 year ago
I can't even begin to count the number of times I've read this book. Every time the adventure is just as fresh and fun and I still hold my breath waiting to see if he'll make it in time. It's a classic for good reason.